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Full text of "General orders and circulars issued by the Navy Department, from 1863 to 1887"

GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS 



ISSUED BY THE 



NAVY DEPARTMENT 



From 1863 to 1887. 



WITH AN 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX OK SUBJECTS; 



ALSO AN 



INDEX OF BUREAU AND MARINE CORPS CIRCULARS, 
GENERAL COURT-MARTIAL ORDERS, AND 
SPECIAL DEATH NOTTCE& 



COMPILED BY 

IMI. S. THOMPSOIST, 

BY AUTHORITY OF THE NAVY DEPARTMENT. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1887. 



PREFACE 



In explanation of this compilation it is stated — 

First. Nearly if not all of the orders and circulars issued prior to 1&63 
have become obsolete, and were not numbered nor regularly distributed ; 
since that date they have been numbered consecutively. 

ticeond. The action on general courts-martial was promulgated in general 
orders up to January 9, 1877, the last being General Order, No. -21 ; from 
that date to February 4, 1879, it became only a matter of record; Bince 
then, however, general court-martial orders have been issued in regular 
" yearly series." Only cases of commissioned, non-commissioned, and war- 
rant oflicers are noted in this compilation. 

Third. As a matter of convenience to those who may have occasion to 
refer to them, the subject and dates of Bureau Circulars, Death Notices, 
and Marine Corps Orders have been given as far as possible. 

Much care has been taken to make this compilation as complete as pos- 
sible, within the dates specified, and to present a subject as well as an alpha- 
betical index of the matter contained therein. 

It is hoped that it will prove a convenient hand-book to the service. 

M. S. THOMPSON, 

/// cKargi of Files mni Records. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



General Order, No. 1. 

January 10, 1863. 
Superseded by paragraph 139, page 24, Navy Kegulations. 



January 12, 1863. 

Acting Master William R. Rude having been reported to the Department for inflict- 
ing illegal punishment, by "tricing up," and it appearing, upon investigation, that 
he was aware at the time of inflicting such punishment that it was unauthorized by 
law, has been dismissed from the naval service of the United States. 

Officers of the Navy will bear in mind that the only punishments permitted on 
board of vessels of the Navy, except by sentence of a General or Summary Court- 
Martial, are those specified in the 10th article, section 1, of the "Act for the better 
government of the Navy," approved July 17, 1862, and that the hra in this respect 
will be faithfully observed. 



General Order, No. 3. 

January 13, 1863. 
At a Marine General Court-Martial, recently held at the Navy Yard. Philadelphia, 

Private William Galbraith, of the Marine Corps, was tried on the following charge 

and specifications: 

Charge. — "Disobedience of lawful orders of his superior officer." 

Specification 1st — "In this: that on or about the 22d day of December, in the year 
eighteen hundred and sixty-two, on board the i T nited States screw sloop 
Juniata, at Philadelphia, the isaid Private William (lalhraith, having been 
ordered, by Orderly Sergeant Sloan, to turn out of his* hammock, refused to 
obey the said order." 

Specification 2d — " In this: that at the time and place set forth in the preceding spe- 
cification, the said Private William (ialbraith, having been ordered by his com- 
manding officer, Lieutenant Commander James G. Maxwell, to stand extra 
posts, refused to obey the said order." 

Upon which charge and specifications the finding and sentence of the court were 
as follows : 

Of the 1st ^verification of Charge, "Guilty." 

Of the 2d Specification of ('barge, "Guilty." 

Of the Charge, " Guilty." 

And the Court do award the following 

Sentence: 

••To be confined on board the United States screw sloop Juniata for thirty days, in 
double irons, on bread and water: every seventh day to have full rations while con- 
fined; to the loss of three months' pay; to stand regular guard every day for thirty 
days, with one extra post of two hours each day in addition to the regular duty." 

The Court would respectfully state that they have been induced to adjudge this 
mild .sentence wholly in consequence of the youth and inexperience of the accused. 

* # *■ a 

The sentence of the (iourt in this case is not approved. 

The offense of disobedience of orders is one of the most serious known to the mili- 
tary code, and the person found guilty of it is liable to the punishment of death. 
Yet in this case of a deliberate and repeated commission of the offense, the court has 
awarded no greater punishment than a summary court-martial is authorized to inflict 
for the trivial offenses which are " not sufficient to require trial by general court- 
martial." 

A sentence of this kind is not only subversive of discipline, but in direct violation 
of the law, which makes it " the duty of a court-martial, in all cases of conviction, 
to adjudge a punishment adequate to the character and nature of the offense com- 
mitted; but the members of a court may recommend the person convicted as deserv- 
ing of clemency, and state on the record their reasons for so doing." 



6 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

No. 4. 

January 14, 1863. 

Publishing Executive Proclamation of January 1, 1863, declaring the freedom of 
all persons held as slaves in certain States in rebellion, &c. 

General Order, No. 5. 

February 10, 1863. 
The following General Order of the President is published for the information and 
government of the officers and others of the naval service. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order respecting the observance of the Sabbath day in the Army and Navy. 
Executive Mansion, Washington, November 15, 1862. 

The President, Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy, desires and enjoins the 
orderly observance of the Sabbath by the officers and men in the military and naval 
service. The importance for man and beast of the prescribed weekly rest, the sacred 
rights of Christian soldiers and sailors, a becoming deference to the best sentiments 
of a Christian people, and a due regard for the Divine will, demand that Sunday 
labor in the Army and Navy be reduced to the measure of strict necessity. 

The discipline and character of the national forces should not suffer, nor the cause 
they defend be imperiled, by the profanation of the day or name of the Most High. 
"At this time of public distress," adopting the words of Washington in 1776, "men 
may find enough to do in the service of God and their country, without abandoning 
themselves to vice and immorality." The first General Order issued by the Father 
of his Country after the Declaration of Independence indicates the spirit in which 
our institutions were founded and should ever be defended: u The General hopes and 
trusts that every officer and man will endeavor to live and act as becomes a Christian soldier 
defending the dearest rights and liberties of his country." 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



General Order, No. 6. February 24, 1863. 

The attention of commanding officers has frequently been called to the provisions 
of section 16 of an act for the better government of the Navy, approved July 17, 1862, 
which is in these words: 

Sec. 16. And be it further enacted, That each commanding officer shall, whenever a man enters on hoard, cause 
an accurate entry to be made in the ship's books of his name, the date, place, and term of his enlistment, the 
place or vessel from which he was received on board, his rating, and his descriptive list, to include his age, 
place of birth, and citizenship, with such remarks as may be necessary ; and shall, before sailing, transmit to 
the Secretary of the Navy a complete list or muster-roll of the rated men under his command, showing the par-_ 
ticulars above set forth, and also a list of officers and passengers, with the date of their entering ; and he sliaU 
cause similar lists t<> tie made out on the first day of every third month, to be transmitted to the. Secretary of the Navy, as 
Opportunities shall occur; accounting in such lists or muster-rolls for any casualties which 'may hare taken place since the 
Imt list or muster-roll. He shall not receive on board any man transferred from any other vessel or station to 
him unless such man be furnished with an account, signed by the captain and paymaster of the vessel or station 
from which he came, specifying the date of his entry, the period and term of service, the sums paid, the balance 
due him, the quality in which he was rated, and his descriptive lists. He shall cause to be accurately minuted 
on the ship's books the names of and times at which any death or desertion may occur ; and, in case of death, 
shall take care that the paymaster secure all the property of the deceased for the benefit of his legal representa- 
tive or representatives. He shall cause frequent inspections to be made into the condition of the provisions, 
and use every precaution for their preservation. He shall, whenever he orders officers and men to take charge 
of a prize and proceed to the United States, and whenever officers or men are sent from his ship, for whatever 
cause, take care that each man be furnished with a complete statement of his account, specifying the date 
of his enlistment, the periods and terms of his service, and his descriptive list; which account shall be signed 
by the commanding officer and paymaster. He shall cause the Articles for the government of the Navy to be 
hung up in some public part of the ship, and read once a month to his ship's company. He shall cause a con- 
venient place to be set apart for sick or disabled men, to which he shall have them removed, with their ham- 
mocks and bedding, when the surgeon -shall so advise, and shall direct that some of the crew attend them and 
keep the place clean. He shall frequently consult with the surgeon in regard to the sanitary condition of his 
crew, and shall use all proper means to preserve their health ; and when his crew is finally paid off he shall 
attend in person, or appoint a proper officer, to see that justice be done to the men and to the United States in 
the settlement of the accounts. Any commanding officer offending herein shall be punished at the discretion 
of a court-martial. 

General Order, No. 7. 

March 5, 1863. 
Publishing finding and sentence by Naval General Court-Martial in cases of Acting 
Master B. G. Pettengill and Acting 2d Assistant Engineer Chas. IT. Cheesebro. 

General Order, No. 8. 

March 7, 1863. 
Dismissal of Acting 2d Assistant Engineer W. R. Manning, Acting Gunner R. L. 
Long, and Acting 3d Assistant Engineer Jeremiah Weitzell. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 7 

General Order, No. 9. 

April 2, 1863. 
Rules in relation to paroles, superseded by Article XVI, sec. 1, Navy Regulations. 



April 3, 1863. 
Regulations regarding medals of honor, superseded by Article XIX, Navy Regular 
tions. 

General Order, No. 11. 

April 3, 1863. 
Awarding medals of honor to — 

James McCloud, captain of foretop, Colorado. 

Louis Richards, quartermaster, Pensacola. 

Thomas Flood, boy, Pensacola. 

James Buck, quartermaster, Brooklyn. 

Oscar E. Peck, boy, Varuna. 
"Thomas Gehegan, boatswain's mate. Panola. 

Edward Parrel, quartermaster, Owasco. 

Peter Williams, seaman, Monitor. 

Benjamin Sevearer, .seaman, Hatteras expedition. 

John Davis, quarter gunner, Valley City. 

Charles Kenyon, fireman, Galena. 

Jeremiah Regan, quartermaster, Galena. 

Alexander Hood, quartermaster, Ceres. 

John Kelley, second-class fireman, Ceres. 

Daniel Lakin, seaman. Commodore Perry. 
• John Williams, seaman, Commodore Perry. 

John Breene, boatswain's mate, Commodore Perry. 

Alfred Peterson, seaman, Commodore Perry. 

Thomas ('. Barton, seaman. Hunchback. 

Edwin Smith, ordinary seaman. Whitehead. 

Daniel Harrington, landsman, Pocahontas. 

John Williams, captain maintop, Pawnee. 

j. B. Frisbee, gunner's mate. Panola. 

Thomas Bourne, seaman, Varuna. 

Wm. McKnight, cockswain. Varuna. 

William Martin, seaman, Varuna. 

John Greene, captain forecastle, Varuna. 

John McGowan, quartermaster, Varuna. 

Amos Bradley, landsman, Varuna. 
t George Hollat, hoy, Varuna. 
$ Charles Florence, boatswain's mate, Cayuga. 

William Young, boatswain's mate. Cayuga. 

William Parker, captain after guard, Cayuga. 

Edward Wright, quartermaster, Cayuga. 

Charles Bradley, boatswain's mate. Louisville. 

Timothy Sullivan, cockswain, Louisville. 

James Byrnes, boatswain's mate, Louisville. 

John McDonald, boatswain's mate. Baron de Kalb. 

Charles Robinson, boatswain's mate. Baron de Kalb. 

Pierre Leon, captain forecastle, Baron de Kalb. 

Peter Cotton, cockswain, Baron de Kalb. 

Chas. W. Morton, boatswain's mate. Benton. 

William Martin, boatswain's mate, Benton. 

Robert Williams, signal quartermaster, Benton. 
•Forfeited medal bj misconduct 
t Medal forfeited — charged with desertion. 
[ Medal withheld on account of misconduct. 



General Order, No. 12. 

April 6, 1863. 
Relative to preparing Prize Lists, superseded by paragraph 724, page 127, Navy 
Regulations. 



General Order, No. 13. 

April 8, 1863. 
Flags of Truce, superseded by sec. 2, Article XVI, Navy Regulations. 



8 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Circular Letter. 

Sir: The act of Congress approved July 16, 1862, provides: 

" That the hours of labor and the rates of wages of the employes in the navy yards 
shall conform, as nearly as is consistent with the public interest, with those of pri- 
vate establishments in the immediate vicinity of the respective yards ; to be deter- 
mined by the commandants of the navy yards, subject to the approval and revision 
of the Secretary of the Navy. 

To arrive at a just scale of compensation, the commandants should ascertain from 
outside establishments in the vicinity of the yards, by the best means in their power, 
the rates of pay and hours of labor to classes similarly employed as those in the yards, 
with the number of men in each class. The number in each class in the yard should 
be in the same proportion to the whole number of workmen employed, that they do 
in private yards, and the compensation should be the same in each case. Particular 
care should be taken to see that the number of workmen in classes receiving the 
highest pay is not relatively greater than in private yards. 

The pay of a foreman in a recognized department will be seventy-five cents a day 
greater than is paid to first-class workmen, and that of a quarterman to every twenty 
men and upwards as the commandant shall approve, fifty cents per day. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

To Commandants, Navy Yards and Squadrons. 

General Order, No. 14. 

June 15, 1863. 
In reference to the payment of prize money annulled. 



General Order, No. 15. 

June 18, 1863. 
Publishing findings and sentences of Naval General Court-Martial in the cases of 
sundry seamen of the Mercedita. 



General Order, No. 15*. 

June 27, 1863. 

Announcing the death of Rear Admiral Andrew Hull Foote, June 26, 1863. 

A gallant and distinguished officer is lost to the country. The hero of Fort Henry 
and Fort Douelson — the daring and indomitable spirit that created and led to succes- 
sive victories the Mississippi Flotilla — the heroic Christian sailor, who, in the China 
seas and on the coast of Africa, as well as the great interior rivers of our country, 
sustained with unfaltering fidelity and devotion the honor of our flag and the cause 
of the Union — Rear Admiral Andrew Hull Foote, is no more. 

On his way to take command of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, a posi- 
tion to which he had been recently assigned, and the duties of which were command- 
ing the earnest energies and vigorous resources of a mind of no ordinary character, 
he was suddenly prostrated by disease, and, after a brief illness, breathed his last at 
the Astor House, at New York, on the evening of the 26th inst. 

Among the noble and honored dead whose names have added lustre to our naval 
renown, and must ever adorn our national annals, few will stand more pre-eminent 
than that of the gallant and self-sacrificing sailor and gentleman whose loss we now 
deplore. Appreciating his virtues and his services, a grateful country had rendered 
him while living its willing honors, and will mourn his death. 

As a mark of respect, it is hereby ordered that the flags at the several navy yards, 
naval stations, and on the flag ships of squadrons, be hoisted at half-mast, and thai 
thirteen minute guns be fired at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 16. 

July 7, 1863. 
Calling attention to the law requiring that official communications to the Depart- 
ments should bear on the envelope the name and rank of the officer sending the 
same. Subsequent legislation renders such endorsement unnecessary. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 9 

General Order, No. 17. July 10, 1863. 

Awarding medals of honor to — 

George Bell, captain after guard, Santee. 

William Thompson, signal quartermaster, Mohican. 

John Williams, boatswain's mate, Mohican. 

Matthew Arthur, signal quartermaster, Carondelet. 

John Mackie, corporal of marines, Galena. 

Matthew McClelland, first-class fireman, Richmond. 

Joseph E. Vantine. first-class fireman, Richmond. 
• John Rush, first-class fireman, Richmond. 

John Hickman, second-class fireman, Richmond. 

Robe it Anderson, quartermaster, Crusader and Keokuk. 

Peter Howard, boatswain's mate, Mississippi. 

Andrew Brinn, seaman, Mississippi. 

P. R. Yaughan, sergeant of marines, Mississippi. 

Samuel Woods, seaman, Minnesota. 

Henry Thielberg, seaman, Minnesota. 

Robot B. Wood, cockswain. Minnesota. 

Robert .Jordan, cockswain, Minnesota. 

Thomas W. Hamilton, quartermaster. Cincinnati. 

Frank Bois, quartermaster, Cincinnati. 

Thomas Jenkins, seaman. Cincinnati. 

Martin McHugh, seaman, Cincinnati. 

Thomas E. Corcoran, landsman, Cincinnati. 

Henry Dow, boatswain's mate. Cincinnati. 

John Woon, boatswain's mate, Pittsburg. 

Chris. Brennen, seaman, Colorado. 

Edward Ringgold, cockswain, Wabash. 



Circular July 16, 1863. 

The question of precedence between regular and volunteer officers of the Navy 
having been referred by the Department to a board of Rear Admirals, they have re- 
ported that, in their opinion: 

1. " All officers holding executive appointments in the Navy, whether in the vol- 
unteer or regular service, should take precedence in their respective grades accord- 
ing to the date of appointment." 

2. " In cases of appointments bearing the same date, the regular officer should take 
precedence of the volunteer officer." 

This opinion is approved and adopted by the Department, and the precedence will 
be regulated accordingly. 

Farther, when the appointments of volunteer officers of the same grade bear the 
same date, precedence between them shall be determined by their positions in alpha- 
betical order on the Register. 
I am, respectful! v, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Sam tar ij of tin Xavy. 
To Commandants j Xacy Fords and Squadron*. 



General Order, No. 18. July 25, 1863. 

Dismissal of Acting First Assistant Engineer Henry I'.. Khodea t <>t the Sonoma, for 
culpable neglect of duty. 



Circular Letter. 

August 11, 1863. 
Silt: Acting appointments of assistant engineers in the Navy of the United States 
will not he made until the applicants have passed satisfactory examinations by the 
chief engineer and surgeon of the navy yard under your command. 

You will accordingly direct those officers to make such examination of the appli- 
cants as, in their opinion, is necessary to decide upon their professional and physical 
fitness for the service, and the chief engineer will forward to the Bureau of Steam 
Engineering weekly the recommendatory letters and other testimonials of experience 
and ability which the applicants may present, together with his recommendation as to 
whether they shall receive appointments or not, and to what grade of assistants, giv- 
ing in all cases the address of the parties. 
Very respectfully, &c, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 
To Commandants, Xavy Yards. 



10 - GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Circular. 

September 14, 1863. 
When men are transferred from a naval station or receiving ship to a squadron 
without designation of the particular vessels on which they are to serve, their ac- 
counts will he sent to the paymaster of the flag-ship of the squadron, who will take 
them up on his hoots until the men are transferred to the vessels in which they are 
to serve. 

GIDEON WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 19. 

September 16, 1863. 
Dismissal of Acting First Assistant Engineers Henry Hill and Nathan D. Bates, of 
the Mercedita and State of Georgia, respectively, for neglect of duty. 

General Order, No. 20. 

October 6, 1863. 
Declaring the forfeiture hy Captain John A . Chauncey of his share in the prize money 
from schooner Alfred, captured hy the Susquehanna, for failing to send in prize list 
as required hy law. 

Circular. 

October 7, 1863. 

Seamen enlisted in the naval service may hereafter, as formerly, he advanced to 
the rating of master's mate, and such rating may he hestowed hy the commander of 
a squadron, subject to the approval of the Department, or by the commander of a 
vessel, with the previous sanction of the Department. 

Seamen so rated will he entitled to the same pay, rank, and privileges as appointed 
or warranted master's mates, hut will not he released hy their rating from the obliga- 
tions of their enlistment, and may be disrated by the order, or with the sanction of 
the Department. They will not, while rated as master's mates, he considered as sub- 
ject to trial by a Summary Court-Martial, nor be disrated by transfer, as in the case 
of petty officers. 

Seamen rated as masters mates will not be discharged with that rating, and will 
be considered as disrated to seamen upon the expiration of their enlistment, but upon 
their immediate re-enlistment, the rating of master's mate may be considered as re- 
newed. The acceptance of such renewed rating will be considered as a renunciation 
of any claim to additional pay for re-enlistment. All ratings of master's mates made 
by order of the commander of a squadron, and all such ratings renewed by re-enlist- 
ment, Avill be reported to the Department as early as practicable. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 21. 

October 17, 1863. 
Dismissal of Acting Second Assistant Engineer John L. Wilson, of the Fort Jackson, 
for neglect of duty. 

General Order, No. 22. 

October, 17, 1863. 

Publishing the findings and sentences in the cases of Captain I). M. Cohen and First 
Lieutenant Wm. B. McKean, of the Marine Corps, under the charge of " scandalous 
conduct, tending to the destruction of good morals" — the first in sending a written 
message, the second in bearing the same, in the nature of a challenge, to E. A. Self ridge, 
clerk of the commandant of the navy yard at Mare Island. 

Upon revision of the records in these cases, it appears that the Court, in each case, 
finds the accused "Guilty" of the specification, but "Not Guilty" of the charge, and 
Captain Cohen is sentenced to be "reprimanded," and Lieutenant McKean to be ad- 
monished," by the Secretary of the Navy. 

These sentences are not confirmed, and the proceedings of the Court disapproved, 
for the following reasons : 

1. The record in neither case exhibits or recites the charge upon which the accused 
was tried, and of which he was found " Not Guilty," nor the specification of which 
he was found " Guilty." 

2. The Court in these cases had no power to find the accused guilty of any other 
charge than that preferred against them; and having found them not guilty of the 
charge preferred, they had no authority to sentence them to any punishment, even 
nominal. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 11 

3. The decision of the Court appears to he directly in conflict with that provision 
of the "Act for the better government of the Navy" which makes it a punishable 
offense to "send or accept a challenge to fight a duel, or act as second in a duel." 
If (here was any offense committed by the accused, it consisted in a violation, or at 
least a manifest evasion, of the law referred to. But. in the opinion of the Court, 
violation or evasion of a law intended for the suppression of a moral offense is not 
"scandalous conduct, tending to the destruction of good morals." 

The Department cannot sanction a decision which would seem to indicate a defi- 
ciency in the moral sense, as well as in the reasoning powers, of those who pronounced 
it, and the tendency of which would be to encourage a disregard of law. 

GIDEON WELLES, 
_ Secretary of the Navy. 

REGULATIONS FOR SUPPLY STEAMERS. 

October 19, 1863. 

(I.) Passengers in any supply steamer of the Navy, messing in the ward-room, shall 
not i>e called upon to pay to the caterer of such mess more than one dollar per day 
while remaining on board. Passengers in any steerage or forward officers' mess of 
such steamer shall not be required to pay more than seventy-five cents per day. 

(II.) No officer oi sutler of a supply steamer will sell any article whatever to per- 
sons on shore, nor shall such officer sell for profit any article to officers or other per- 
sons on board a public or private vessel. Hut this rule will not preclude officers from 
buying stores, &c, for their friends in vessels attached to Blockading Squadrons, 
and receiving therefor the price and expenses actually paid for the same. The sut- 
ler is the only person on hoard allowed to sell stores at a profit, the percentage of 
which is fixed by the Department, and will be strictly adhered t<>. 

(III.) The commanding officer of each supply steamer will sec that the sutler sup- 
plies each mess of ever\ vessel visited, m due proportion, and take cart- thai no 
single person or single mess obtain more than a fair averaj 

(IV.) When meeting a vessel to be supplied the stores should be quickly transfer- 
red so as to create no delay: upon Buch occasions the commander of the supply 

steamer will sec that wines and ales arc not opened and used upon his \ essel. 

For any violation of the foregoing Regulations the Department will hold the com- 
manding officer of the supply steamer in which il ma\ occur stricth responsible. 

GIDEON w l.l. 1. 1 

Seen tary >>f th Navy. 
Sent to Commandants Paulding, Stribbling, Montgomery, and to 

Western (lidj\ Eastern Qu\f, North and Smith Atlantic Blockading Squadrons. 

General Order, No. 23. 

October 27. 1863. 
Dismissal of Acting Volunteer Lieutenant •/. W.Kittredge, in accordance with find- 
ing and sentence of Naval General Court-Martial, on the charge of "maltreatment 

of an ordinary seaman subject to his orders." 

Circular. 

November 3, 1863. 
Sir: The allowance tables issued from the Department, of the date of 20th of July, 

1854, are only to be considered as directly applicable to the vessels built by the Got 
eminent for the naval service, and not to any purchased vessel. 

These allowances for the vessels built by the Government are not in any case to be 
excused, but may be reduced in quantity, and some articles may be omitted when 
not required for the special service on which the vessel is to be employed. With re- 
gard to the purchased vessels Which are on service near our own ports, stores and 
equipments are only to be provided for that service, and are not to exceed the quan- 
tity that can be properly taken care of in each vessel. 

The commandants of the yards must revise all requisitions before they are for- 
warded to the proper Bureaus, that no unnecessary articles la- demanded. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 
To Commandants of Yards and Blockading Squadrons. 

Circular. 

Novi mber, 6, 186:-5. 
Sir: Hereafter the commandants of navy yards and stations will inform the De- 
partment, by special report, of the date when each vessel preparing for sea service, 
at their respective commands, is placed in commission. 



12 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

A vessel is considered in commission when the officers and crew go on board and 
the commandant of the yard or station turns the vessel over to the commanding 
officer. 

Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Commandants of Yards and Stations. 



Circular. 

November 11, 1863. 
Sir: To prevent workmen leaving the yard, before bell-ring, you will cause the 
wall and gates to be closely watched, and a guard-boat to prevent egress by the 
water front. 

You will at such times as you shall think proper, but without the knowledge of any 
one till the order shall have been given, direct the bell to be rung and a muster at 
quarter of any hour before the usual time of bell-ring for going. Citizens on busi- 
ness, or otherwise, of respectable standing, who have not a general pass to enter the 
yard, will be required to receive a pass at the gate and deliver it on going out. 
Very respectfullv, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commandant Navy Yard, Neiv York. 



Circular. 

November 11, 1863. 
Sir: As the machinery for vessels building at the navy yards is much behind the 
progress of the new vessels, you will discharge 15 per cent, of the ship carpenters at 
the yard under your command for the present, and such others engaged on vessels as 
will correspond to the work which will be required after such discharge. 

On making these discharges you will of course select those whose services are 
least valuable. 

When a strike -takes place in any or all of the Departments, the pay and services 
of the master workmen in those Departments will be suspended. 

You will be cautious in employing men who have been discharged for promoting 
strikes. 

Yerv respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commandants Navy Yards. 



Gexerai. Order, No. 24. 

December 2, 1863. 

Publishing the result of the Court of Inquiry upon the capture of the Satellite 
and Reliance. 



General Order, No. 25. 

December 2, 1863. 

Publishing the findings and sentences of John Hale and John McCormick, landsmen, 
and Thomas H. Williams, seaman, tried by Naval General Court-Martial on the 
11 charge of desertion in time of Avar." 



General Order, No. 26. 

December 21, 1863. 

In relation to the 6th section of the act of July 17, 1862, for the better government 
of the Navy, which section has been since repealed. 



Circular. 

December 21, 1863. 

Sir: The Department regrets to perceive that the new designations for uniform, 
such as shoulder-straps, cap ornaments and the cap itself, are so varied by the man- 
ufacturers, that the prescribed uniform can hardly be recognized. 

You will require all officers within the limits of your command to conform, with- 
out unnecessary delay, to the precise style and dimensions of the plates issued by 
the Department, and you will inform it of any neglect to comply with this order. 
Very respectfullv. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Commandants of Navy Yards and Squadrons. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 13 

CIRCULAR. 

December 22, 1863. 

Sir: You will, with as little delay as possible, order a Board of Engineers for the 
examination of such assistant engineers in the Navy for promotion as are eligible 
by length of sea service. The Board will consist of three chief engineers, if that 
number can be obtained, and if not then of two chief engineers and a first assistant 
engineer, the latter to be senior to the candidates. The Board will keep a record of 
its proceedings, and you will transmit the same to the Department at the close of 
the examinations. You will provide the Board with the necessary facilities for 
making the examinations, and will furnish it with a copy of the accompanying in- 
structions for its guidance. You will cause each candidate to undergo a preliminary 
physical examination by one or more medical officers and the Board of Engineers 
will examine no candidate without the certificate of such officer or officers of his 
physical fitness for the duties of his grade. Every candidate must present testimo- 
nials of character, social and professional, from his commanding officers and chief 
engineers. 

It is understood that these instructions and conditions apply temporarily only 
during the war, and to the examination of engineers and squadron. 
Very respectful! v. 

GIDEON WELLES. 

[Instructions follow.] Secretary of the Xacy. 



General Order, No. 27. January 4, m>4. 

Dismissal of Acting Ensign William li. Arrant* for disobedience of orders, result- 
ing in his capture by the. enemy. [Subsequently reinstated.] 



General Ordek, No. 28. January 7. 1864. 

Publishing the finding and sentence of Naval General Court-Martial in the case of 
Lieutenant Commander Richard L. Laic, tried on the following charges: 
Charge I. — "Not doing his utmost to capture or destroy a vessel which it was his 

duty to encounter." 
Specification — "In this: that on or about the first day of January, in the year eigh- 
teen hundred and sixty-three, the said Lieutenant Commander Richard L. Law. 
being in command of the United States steamer Clifton, stationed at Galves- 
ton, Texas, failed to do his utmost to capture or destroy the steamer Harriet 
Lane, then in the possession of the rebels, at Galveston. 
CHARGE II. — " Leaving his station, in time of war. before regularly relieved." 
Specification — "In this: that on or about the first day St* .Januar\ . in the year eigh- 
teen hundred and Sixty-three, the said Lieutenant Commander Richard J.. Laic, 
being then in command of the United states steamer Clitton. and stationed at 
Galveston, Texas, on blockading duty, left the said station without permis- 
sion, and without having been regularly relieved."' 
Specifications proven, and of the charges found guilty. Sentenced to be dismissed 
the Naval Service. 

Recommendation of Court. 
It appearing from the evidence that Lieutenant Commander B, L. Laic behaved 
with gallantry in his attack upon the battery at Fort Point and the batteries of the 
town, and, from the testimony of Rear Admiral Farragut. that he bore a high char- 
acter as an officer and a gentleman during the w hole course of his professional career 
up to January 1, 1863. the Court do unanimously recommend him to the clemency of 
the revising power. 

Upon a revision of the record in this case, the finding and sentence of the Court 
have been approved. The offenses of which the accused was convicted, when com- 
mitted in time of war, are made punishable, by the act for the better government of 
the Navy, by death, "or such other punishment as a court-martial shall adjudge." 
An officer could not well be convicted ot offenses more derogatory to his professional 
character, nor more imperatively requiring an example of severe punishment. 

In consideration, however, of the facts stated in the recommendation of the Court, 
and of other mitigating circumstances which appear in the case, the President has 
been pleased to yield to the appeal to his clemency, and to mitigate the punishment 
awarded to suspension from rank and duty for three years, the first six months of the 
said term without pay. 

Lieutenant Commander Lair will accordingly be considered as so suspended from 
this date. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



14 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Circular. 

January 13, 1864. 
The Department announces to the Navy and the Marine Corps the death of Rear 
Admiral George W. Stoker. He died at his residence in Portsmouth, N. H., on the 
morning of the 8th instant, after an honorable career in the Navy of nearly fifty-five 
years. Rear Admiral Store r was correct in his deportment, attached to his profes- 
sion, and devoted to his country. As an officer in the Navy he has served faithfully, 
and has filled with credit many important positions both ashore and afloat. 

As a mark of respect to his memory, it is hereby directed that at the Portsmouth, 
N. H., Navy Yard the flags be hoisted at half-mast and thirteen minute-guns be fired 
at meridian on the day after the receipt hereof. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

January 23, 1864. 
The disreputable practice of giving and receiving presents or gratuities, or votes 
of thanks from inferiors to superiors, or from the employed to the employers, without 
the previous sanction of the Navy Department, is often a method of extortion prac- 
ticed upon the workmen that is disgraceful to the receiver and is strictly forbidden. 
Any person hereafter violating this order will subject himself to be summarily dis- 
missed. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 29. 

February 1, 1864. 
Regarding the admission of wines and ales on board vessels of the Navy, super- 
seded by paragraph 694, page 122, Navy Regulations. 



Circular. 

February 12, 1864. 

Pay officers of the Navy will render their final accounts and returns to the Fourth 
Auditor of the Treasury and the Chief of the Rureau of Provisions and Clothing as 
soon as practicable after the expiration of their cruise, but not exceeding the follow- 
ing time after the crew shall have been paid off or transferred: 

For vessels of the first rate, sixty days ; 

For vessels of the second rate, fifty days; 

For vessels of the third rate, forty days; 

For vessels of all other rates, thirty days. 

Pay officers will be allowed other duty-pay for themselves and their clerks for the 
time employed in the settlement of their accounts not exceeding the periods above 
specified. 

Final accounts in all cases will be accompanied by the necessary vouchers for a 
complete settlement of such accounts. 

Returns and accounts intended for the Fourth Auditor's Office or for the Rureau of 
Provisions and Clothing will be addressed and sent directly to those offices respect- 
ively. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

February 26, 1864. 

It is hereby directed that if any employe" in any navy yard or at any naval station 

shall have at any time claimed, or shall hereafter claim, exemption from any draft 

of men that may be ordered by the President of the United States, on the ground of 

alienage, such employe be dismissed and the facts reported to the Navy Department. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Commandants of Yards and Squadrons. 



General Order, No. 30. 

February 29, 1864. 
Publishing finding and sentence of Naval General Court-Martial in the case of Ed. 
McClain, 1st class fireman ; dismissal of Acting Chief Engineer Thomas Doughty, and 
Acting First Assistant Engineer G. H. Hobbs, for furnishing men with liquor. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 15 

General Order, No. 31. 

March 22, 1864. 

Ensigns B. S. Chew and H. J. Blake having been reported to the Department for 
going below in their watch without being regularly relieved, while on duty on board 
the U. 8. steam frigate Niagara (Commodore T. T. Craven, commanding, and Lieu- 
tenant Commander Henry Erben, executive officer), their appointments to the grade- 
of lieutenant, for which they were recently nominated to the Senate and confirmed, 
have been suspended. 

For the same offense, the appointments of Acting Ensigns W. S. Dana, E. F. Har- 
rington, Wm. I>. Hoff, and C. Bathbone have been revoked, and they have been ordered 
to return to their studies at the Naval Academy at Newport, R. I., as midshipmen. 

Acting Ensign B. C. Irvin, who was also attached to the Niagara, and was guilty 
of the offense of overstaying his leave, has been ordered to the U. S. steamer Glaucus 
(third rate), with directions that he shall not for six months be permitted to go out 
of that vessel. 

The Department cannot admit the plea of ignorance, or that of usage on board the 
vessels at the Naval Academy, on the part of these officers, who, however young, 
have been long enough in the service to aspire to and expect promotion. If they had 
no other source of information, they should have learned from the "Act for the better 
government of the Navy," with which all persons in the service must be supposed te 
be familiar, that to "leave his station before regularly relieved" is an offense which 
subjects the person guilty of it to the punishment of death. It must, indeed, be 
obvious to the most ordinary intelligence that if an officer cannot be trusted in his 
watch, he has yet to learn the simplest practical duties of his profession, and is un- 
fitted for a station where the lives of others, as well as the honor of his country, may 
depend on his vigilance and fidelity. 

The lenient course which the Department has adopted in this case has been induced 
by the consideration that although the severe punishment which a court-martial 
would adjudge might be more effectual as a warning, yet the young officers in fault 
may, with some reason, plead in extenuation of their offenses, that they were not 
duly admonished by those whose duty it was to impress them with a proper sense of 
discipline, of the serious nature and inevitable consequences of their misconduct. 
It is not probable that so many of them would have erred habitually on board the 
Niagara except from this cause. 

GIDEON WELL1 

r< tary of <l" Navy. 

Circular. 

April 11, 1864. 

In the Navy Kegister for ltfb'4 the relative rank of first and second assistant engi- 
neers is incorrectly stated. 

The rank of first assistants should read M with masters," and second assistants, 
"with ensigns;" and officers of the Navy will be governed accordingly. 

GIDEON WELL1 

Secretary of tin- Navy. 



General Order, No 32. 

April 16, 1864. 
Awarding medals of honor to — 

J. K. L. Duncan, ordinary seaman, Fort ITindman. 
Hugh Melloy, ordinary seaman, Fort Uindman. 
Wm. P. .Johnson, landsman, Fort Hindman. 
Bartlett Laftey, seaman. Petrel. 
Jas. Stoddard, seaman, Marmora. 
Wm. J. Franks, seaman, Marmora. 
Richard Seward, paymaster's steward, Commodore. 
Christopher Nugent, orderly sargeant Marines, Fort Henry. 
James Brown, quartermaster, Albatross. 
William Moore, boatswain's mate, Denton.. 
William P. Brownell, cockswain, Benton. 
*John Jackson, ordinary seaman, C. P. Williams. 
William Talbott, captain forecastle, Louisville. 
Richard Stout, landsman, Isaac Smith. 
Geo. W. Leland, gunner's mate, Lehigh. 
Thos. Irving, cockswain, Lehigh. 
Horatio N. Young, seaman, Lehigh. 
William Williams, landsman, Lehigh. 

-. * Awarded under an erroneous report — not entitled to it. 



16 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Frank S. Gile, landsman, Lehigh. 

Michael Huskey, fireman, Carondelet. 

John Dorman, seaman, Carondelet. 

William Farley, boatswain's mate, Marblehead. 

Chas. Moore, landsman, Marblehead. 

James Miller, quartermaster, Marblehead. 

Robert Blake (colored), powder boy. Marblehead. 



General Order, No. 33. 

May 3, 1864. 
At a Naval General Court-Martial recently convened in the city of Washington, 
Commodore Charles Wilkes, of the Navy, was tried upon the following charge* 
preferred against him by the Department : 

Charge I. — " Disobedience of the lawful orders of his superior officer while in the 
execution of his office." 

Charge II. — "Insubordinate conduct and negligence or carelessness in obeying 

orders." 
Charge III.— " Disrespect and disrespectful language to his superior officer whilst 

in the execution of his office." 
Charge IV. — "Refusal of obedience to a lawful General Order or Regulation issued 

by the Secretary of the Navy." 
Charge V. — "Conduct unbecoming an officer, and constituting an offense made 
punishable by Article VIII of the Articles adopted and put in force for the 
government of the Navy of the United States." 
Of each of these charges the accused was found by the Court " Guilty," and was 
sentenced in the following terms: 

"And the Court does hereby sentence the accused, Commodore Charles Wilkes, to 
be publicly reprimanded by the Secretary of the Navy, and to be suspended from 
duty for the term of three years." 
The finding of the Court in this case is approved and the sentence confirmed. 
In carrying into execution that part of the sentence which requires that Commo- 
dore Wilkes be publicly reprimanded, I hardly need say more, to an officer of his age 
and experience in the service, than that the promulgation of such charges, and of 
the decision upon them by a Court composed of officers of the highest rank in the 
Navy, constitutes in itself a reprimand sufficiently poignant and severe to any one 
who may have desired to preserve an untarnished record in the service. 

The Department would gladly have been spared the unpleasant duty which has 
devolved upon it in this case; but the appeal made to the public by the accused, in 
a paper which the Court has pronounced to be "of an insubordinate and disrespect- 
ful character, containing remarks and statements not warranted by the facts," ren- 
dered it necessary for the Department either to tolerate the disrespect and submit to 
the unfounded aspersions, or refer the case to the investigation and decision of a 
court-martial. 

GIDEON WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

General Ordek, No. 34. 

May 4, 1864. 
Publishing an " act fixing certain rules and regulations for preventing collisions 
on the water." Embraced in section 2, article IX, Navy Regulations. 



General Order, No. 35. 

May 5, 1864. 
Dismissal of Acting Master Edward Jones, for kicking and abusing a seaman, and 
of Acting Assistant Surgeon W. H. Harlin, for screening the offender. 



Circular. 

May 5, 1864. 
Hereafter all reports of surveys will be forwarded through the respective fleet 
officers for their endorsement, previous to being sent to the Commander-in-Chief for 
the Navy Department, or Bureaus. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Squadrons. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 17 

Circular. May 12, 1864. 

The Secretary of the Navy announces to the Navy and Marine Corps the death of 
Colonel John Harris, the colonel commandant of the Marine Corps, which occurred 
in the city of Washington on the morning of the 12th instant. The deceased entered 
the Marine Corps on the 13th of April. 1814, and was appointed to the command of 
it 7th of January, 1857. 

For half a century he performed the duties entrusted to him with zeal and effi- 
ciency, and was regarded as a reliable, upright, and intelligent officer, exerting him- 
self on all occasions to maintain the discipline and gallantry of the corps 

In respect to his memory, it is hereby directed that on the day after the receipt 
hereof, the flags at the different marine barracks and at the Washington Navy Yard 
be hoisted at half-mast: also, that eleven minute-guns be tired from the Washington 
yard at meridian. 

Officers of the Marine Corps will wear crape on the left arm for thirty days. 

G TDK OX WELLES, 

Seen tary of the Navy. 



General Order. No. 36. May 16, 1864! 

Pay Table of petty officers and seamen. (Set Pay Tabh in Navy Register.) 



General Order, No. 37. May 17, 1864. 

The attention of General Courts-Martial is directed to seel ion - of the "Act relating 
to appointments in the Naval Service and Courts-Martial," approved May Id, 1*64. 
as follows : 

"Jnd he it further enacted, That Naval Courts-Martial shall have power to sentence 
officers who shall absent themselves from their commands without leave, to be reduced 
to the rating of ordinary seamen." 

<.IDK(»N WELLES, 

Seen lory of tht Navy. 



Circulak. . May SO, 1864. 

Sir: The Act of Congress approved 16th of July, 1862, directs, "Thai the hours 
of labor and rate of wages of the employes in the navy yards shall conform, as 
nearly as is consistent with the public interest, with those of private establishments 
in the immediate vicinity of the respective yards, to he determined by the command- 
ants of the navy yards, subject to the approval and revision of the Secretary of the 
Navy/' The effect of this law causes continuous applications to the Department for 
changes in the pay of workmen in the navy yards, and creates much emharrassment 
and annoyance to the Department. 

It is hereby ordered that the commandants of each yard appoint a Hoard, to be 
composed of one line officer, one head of Division, and one master workman, to make 
diligent inquiry at the principal private mechanical establisments in the vicinity of 
the yard, and ascertain the established rule for working hours at each establish- 
ment, the number of men employed, the number of classes of workmen, the number 
in each class, and the rate of wages paid each class of workmen. 

This information having been obtained, the Hoard will report the result, with a 
statement of the private establishments called upon, to the commandant, who will 
cause to be posted at the muster office, for two days previous to the 25th of the 
month, the reported scale of wages, that the workmen may examine it and state 
their views of its merits to the commandant. The scale then fixed upon will be sub- 
mitted to the Department, and if approved, the rate established will remain in force 
for two months without change. This order to take effect on the first of .June next, 
and on the 15th day of every second month thereafter a similar investigation will be 
made and the result reported as before. From the first of June the wages of master 
workmen not on salary will be advanced fifty cents per diem, and writers not on 
salary, and under three dollars, will be advanced twenty-live cents per diem. 

GIDEON WELLES, 
Commandant* of Navy Yards. Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular Letter. 

May 26, 1864. 
Sir: Painters, 1st class, is hereby substituted for " Painter's mates," and Painters, 
2d class, for "Painters," in General Order, No. 36, issued on the 16th instant. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 
Commandants of Navy Yard* and Squadron^. Secretary of the Savy. 



18 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Circular. 

May 27, 1864. 
The following Act of Congress is published for the information of paymasters and 
other officers of the Navy. 

C4IDEON WELLES, ^ 

Secretary of the Navy. 
• # * * * # •** # 

An Act for the classification of the clerks to paymasters in the Navy, and gradu- 
ating their pay. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Souse of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That the annual pay of clerks to paymasters in the Navy shall 
be as follows, namely: Clerks to paymasters at the Boston, New York, Washington, 
and Philadelphia stations, twelve hundred dollars; at other stations, one thousand 
dollars. Clerks to inspectors in charge of provisions and clothing at Boston, New 
York, and Philadelphia, twelve hundred dollars ; at other inspections, one thousand 
dollars. Clerks to paymasters in receiving ships at Boston and New York, twelve 
hundred dollars ; on other receiving ships and in vessels of the first rate and at the 
Naval Academy, one thousand dollars. Clerks to fleet paymasters and to paymasters 
of vessels of the second rate, eight hundred dollars. 

Clerks to paymasters of vessels of the third rate having complements of more than 
one hundred and seventy-five persons, and to paymasters of supply steamers and 
store vessels, seven hundred dollars: Provided, that no paymaster or assistant pay- 
master shall be allowed a clerk in a vessel having the complement of one hundred 
and seventy-five persons or less, excepting in supply steamers and store vessels. 
And provided further, that nothing in this act shall be construed to alter the pay 
now allowed by law to the paymaster's clerk at Mare Island. 
Approved May 26, 1864. 



General Order, No. 38. 

June 27, 1864. 
Dismissal of Second Assistant Engineer S. Willcins Cragy, inspector of the boilers 
of the Chenango. 



General Order, No. 39. 

July 16, 1864. 
Publishing finding and sentence of Naval General Court-Martial in the case of Acting 
3d Assistant Engineer William J. Moffit. Charge, "Desertion." Found Guilty. " Re- 
duced to the rating of a first-class fireman, to serve for the term of two years, and to 
forfeit all pay now due him." 



General Order, No. 40. 

Augusts, 1864. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the Navy Yard, New York, Acting 
Third Assistant Engineer George W. Latham, of the Navy, was recently tried and found 
guilty of the charges of "drunkenness" and "assaulting and abusing an offi- 
cer," and was sentenced in the following terms: 

"To be suspended from duty for two months from the date of the sentence, and to 
be confined during that time within the limits of the United States receiving ship at 
the New York navy yard, and to be reprimanded by the honorable the Secretary of 

the Navy in General Orders." 

* . # * * * * * 

The sentence in this case is disapproved, and will not be carried into execution. 

The Department has had occasion more than once since the passage of the revised 
"Act for the better government of the Navy," to direct the attention of courts-martial, 
by General Orders, to that article of the law which provides that "it shall be the 
duty of a court-martial, in all cases of conviction, to adjudge a punishment adequate 
to the character and nature of the offense committed; but the members of a court 
may recommend the person convicted as deserving of clemency, and state on the 
record their reasons for so doing." 

This sentence appears to the Department, after a full consideration of the record 
in the case, to be even more objectionable and more in disregard of the law than the 
sentences which called forth the General Orders referred to. The engineers of a ship- 
of-war should, perhaps more than any other class of officers, be exempt from the dis- 
qualifying vice of indulgence to excess in intoxicating liquors. The safety of the 
ship, its efficiency — even the honor of the flag — depends in a great degree on their 
sobriety and vigilant attention to duty. Yet, for the offense of drunkenness, aggra- 
vated by the assault and abuse of an officer, and without any palliating circum- 
stances to authorize a recommendation to clemency, an engineer is sentenced by this 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 19 

Court to be relieved from duty for two months without losing any portion f his 
pay. The same officer, if he had committed no offense, could not have obtained per- 
mission from the Department, under present circumstances, to remain idle for two 
months, rendering no service, yet receiving pay. 

If the sentence were approved, the Department would be unable, after such appro- 
val, to frame a reprimand which would impress upon the convicted officer a proper 
sense of the gravity of the offense committed by him. He would necessarily infer 
from the sentence and its approval that his offense was of the most trifling character. 
and thus be led to a repetition of it. 

Acting Third Assistant Engineer Latham is relieved from arrest, and will be ordered 
to duty. 

GIDEON WELLES. 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. August 9. 1861. 

The following course of examination will be required for all officers of the volun- 
teer naval service, for entering that service or for promotion in it. The commanding 
officers of squadrons will, upon recommending an officer of the volunteer naval serv- 
ice for promotion, forward at the same time to this Department ;i report of his qual- 
ifications, in accordance with these regulations. And should a volunteer officer be 
reported by his commanding officer as incompetent to discharge the duties assigned 
him, he will be subjected to this examination, a report of which will he forwarded 
to the Department. 

In the examination of candidates for the position of ACTING Matk, there being but 
three years' sea service required, a proficiency in seamanship and navigation is not 
to be expected. It is desirable to ascertain the general intelligence <>t' tin- candidate 
and his aptitude for the duties of the position. 
In Seamanship. — Such ordinary routine of ship duties and knowledge of seamanship 

as any one may acquire in three years at sea. 
Navigation. — Observing and working the meridian altitude of the sun tor latitude. 
and dead reckoning. 

* Acting Ensign. 

Will be examined in — 

Seamanship. — General routine of rigging ship and stowing hold: bending, unbend- 
ing, reefing, and fuiling sails ; Working anchors, cables, and hawsers: tacking, 
wearing, and the ordinary evolutions; hand and deep-sea lead lines. 

Navigation. — Log-line, compass and its correct ions ; dead reckoning, use and adjust- 
ments of sextant and quadrant; observing and working meridian altitude and 
longitude by chronometer. 

GUNNERY. — .Stationing men at gun. and gun exerci.se: loading, and use of tangent 
sight and fuzes; small-arm drill and broad-sword exercise. 
The examination in gunnery is only to be required in candidates for promotion who 

have served as Acting Mates, and not for original appointments to Acting Ensigns. 

Acting Master. 

Seamanship. —Rigging, and stowing hold, as practiced in the naval service; naval 
routine of bending and unbending sails: crossing and sending down yards; 
working ship and sails under all circumstances, and working anchors and cables. 

Navigation. — Log-line, compass and its correct ions; dead reckoning: use of sextant, 
with coirect ions and adjustments; observing and wording meridian altitude, 
single and double altitudes: longitude by chronometer and lunar distances; 
amplitude and azimuth; latitude by Polar star: treatment of and rating chro- 
nometer; use of barometer and thermometer, and use of (harts. 

Gunnery. — Stationing men at guns; broadside and pivot gun : small-arm and broad- 
sword exercise; use of tangent sight: mounting and dismounting guns: exer- 
cise of boat and field howitzer; stowing magazine and shell-room and working 
powder division; use and adjustment of fuzes, and general use and manage- 
ment of rifle guns. 
In addition, the candidate will be examined and a report made as to his proficiency 

in the ordinary branches of English education — reading, writing, arithmetic, and 

geography — specifying any accomplishments which the candidate may possess. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant*. 

The examination will consist of that specified for Acting Masters, with the addition 
in — 
Seamanship, watching, and stationing crews for all evolutions, and requiring a 

greater proficiency in all naval routine, and the management of a vessel under 

sail and steam. 
Gunnery.— A good knowledge of Ordnance Manual. 



20 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Commanders and Acting Volunteer Commander*. 

The examination the same as for Acting Volunteer Lieutenants, hut to he conducted 
with more precision, and with a view to ascertain the qualification of the candidate 
for separate command, and ability for conducting correspondence. &c. All the re- 
quirements are to he strictly complied with. 

Board for examination for Acting Mate will consist of one Acting Volunteer Lieu- 
tenant, or Master, and two Acting Ensigns. 

For Acting Ensign, will consist of one regular officer and two volunteer, not be- 
low the grade of Master. 

For Acting Master, will consist of one regular officer and two Volunteer Lieu- 
tenants. 

For Acting Volunteer Lieutenant, will consist of two regular officers and one 
Acting Volunteer Lieutenant. 

For Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Commander, will consist of two Commanders 
and one Lieutenant Commander. 

For Acting Volunteer Commander, will consist of one Commodore, or Captain, 
and two Commanders. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of ike Navy.. 



Circular. August 13, 1864. 

Circular No. 38, issued hy the Provost Marshal (ieneral, is as follows: 
,; Skilled mechanics and operatives employed in the armories, arsenals, and navy 
yards of the LJnited States who shall he drafted, and, on examination, held to service, 
will not be required to report for duty under such draft so long as they remain in 
the aforesaid service, provided the officer in charge shall certify that their lahor as 
mechanics or operatives is necessary for the Naval or Military Service. In accordance 
with the provisions of the circular, should skilled mechanics and operatives employed 
in the yard be drafted, the commandant will certify to the Provost Marshal General 
that their labor as mechanics or operatives is necessary for the naval service. The 
exemption from military duty continues only as long as the drafted persons are em- 
ployed in the navy yard, and should either of them leave for any cause, the fact will 
be immediately reported, to the Provost Marshal General. The commandant will 
decide w'hat operatives come within the provisions of the circular. 
Verv respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 
To Commandants of Navy Yards. Secretary of the Navy. 



General Orders, No. 41. October 26, 1864. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the Naval Academy. Newport, R. I., 
October 13, 1864, Midshipman Edward X. Both was arraigned on a charge of " violating 
a General Order of the Secretary of the Navy," hy causing a quantity of spirituous 
liquor to be brought on board the practice ship 'Macedonian: of which charge he 
pleaded ''Guilty," and was sentenced by the Court to be dismissed from the Navy 
of the United States." 

At the same Court, Midshipman Robert E. Carmody was arraigned on the charge of 
" drunkenness,"' of which he pleaded " Guilty ;" and the sentence of the Court is, that 
he "be suspended from duty for six months, be dismissed from the Naval Academy during 
that period, and that his pay and emoluments be suspended during one-half of that period." 

At the same Court, Midshipman Benjamin S. Richards was arraigned on the charge 
of "drunkenness." of which he pleaded " Guilty ;" and the sentence of the Court is, 
that he "he suspended from duty for five months, to be dismissed from the Naval Academy 
during that period, and that his pay and emoluments be suspended for three months.'' 

The proceedings and sentences of the Court in these cases are approved. 

In the case of Midshipman Roth, the Court say: "The evidence shows that this is 
the first grave oifense the accused has committed since he has been at the Academy, 
and the Court therefore suggests that the revising authority should take this fact 
into consideration in the final disposition of his case." 

In view of the recommendation of the Court, the sentence in the case of Midship- 
man Roth will be suspended for further consideration. 

The sentences in the cases of Midshipmen Carmody and Richards will be carried into 
execution, the suspension in each case to take effect from this date. 

The records in these cases show that the accused were properly warned by the pre- 
siding officer of the nature of the plea of " Guilty." This should be done in all cases 
where a plea of guilty is made, but more particularly when the inexperience or con- 
dition of the person arraigned may suggest a doubt whether he is fully sensible of 
the nature of the plea. * 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 21 

Circular. 

November 15, 1864. 

Sir: When articles are required for which there is an existing contract, the store- 
keeper will make requisition, approved by the commandant, directly upon the con- 
tractor, and not upon the navy yard. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 
To Commandants of Navy Yard*. Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 42. 

December 1, 1864. 

Publishing Executive Order of September 24, 1861, relative to the purchase of pro- 
ducts of insurrectionary States. 



General Order, No. 43. 

December 7, 1864. 

Dismissal of Captain Edward McD. Reynolds, of the Marine Corps, as morally unfit 
for the service. 



General Order, No. 14. 

December 7, 1864, 

Publishing findings and sentences of Naval General Courts-Martial in the eases of — 

Wm, ./. Lewis, master's mate, Wabash, on the charge of "drunkenness." Sentence 
of dismissal mitigated to suspension and confinement for two months <>n half-pay. 

G. TV. Caswell, acting master, St. Lawrence, "was found guili\ of * disobedience of 
orders,' in that he did not return to his vessel at BUnset, and 01 'treating with con- 
tempt his superior officer while in the execution of his office,' and sentenced 'to be 
cashiered, and forever disqualified from holding any office or appointment under 
the government of the United States.' A court-martial cannot disqualify any person 
in this manner; this part of the penalty is therefore remitted, and the sentence is 
mitigated to ■ confinement for three months without pay;' and will be executed at 
the Navy Yard, Boston." 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant J. M. Williams, guilty of" drunkenness," and "conduct 
unbecoming an officer, ■' and sentenced him -> To be dismissed the service." But in 
consequence of the recommendation of the Court, and test imonialsof previous correct 
habits and deportment, and desiring to afford him an opportunity to retrieve his 
character, the sentence of the Court in this case i> gel aside, and Acting Volunteer 
Lieutenant*/. .1/. Williams wiU return to duty, remembering thai the charges proven 
against him are still stains upon his reputation as an officer and hi> character as a 
gentleman, which, though unpunished, are not removed, and can only be atoned for 
by a strict and constant attention to duty, and by avoiding everj irregularity in 
habits or deportment. 

James II. McClure, acting master's mate of the U. S. S. Minnesota, was found guilty 
of " insubordinate conduct," '• conduct unbecoming an officer," and " using threats of 

violence towards an officer," and was sentenced " to be reduced to i lie rate of ordinary 
seaman for fifteen months, and. at the expiration of that time, to be dishonorably 
discharged the naval service of the United States;' 1 which sentence is approved i»\ 

this Department. 

C. II. Bertram, acting third assistant engineer of the l. 8. 8. Taoony, was found 
guilty of " violation of the act of Congress prohibiting the introduction of spirituous 
liquors on hoard vessels of the U. S. Navy." and was sentenced to "confinement for 
six months in such place, other than a prison, as the Secretary of the Navy may assign, 
with forfeiture of all pay and subsistence that may accrue during that time, except- 
ing such as may he necessary for his actual support, and to be reprimanded in Gen- 
eral Orders.'' lie will be confined at the Navj Yard. Boston. Mass. 

William Mowbray, gunner, U. S. Navy, was found guilty of "absence from his sta- 
tion and duty after leave expired." " neglect of duty." and " falsehood," and sentenced 
"to be dismissed the service;" but, by reason of the recommendation of the Court, 
the sentence is mitigated to "suspension on half-pay for six months," and so approved. 

Thomas Hue ling, acting masters mate of the U. S. S. Phlox, was found guilty of 
•'mutinous conduct," and was sentenced "to be confined for ten years at hard labor 
in such penitentiary as the Hon. Secretary of the Navy may direct, and to forfeit all 
pay and allowances now due or that may become due during that period; and that r 
at the end of ten years, he be dishonorably discharged from the Navy of the United 
States." This sentence will be carried into execution at the penitentiary at Albany, 
New York. 



22 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

John McGovern, acting master's mate of the IT. S. S. Phlox, was found guilty of 
" drunkenness," and sentenced to "dismissal from the service." This sentence is 
mitigated to "suspension from duty without pay for three months;" and thus is 
approved. 

C. F. Russell, acting ensign of the U. S. S. Commodore Morris, was found guilty of 
"overstaying his leave" and "treating with contempt his superior officer while in 
the execution of his office," and sentenced "to be dismissed the service " In this 
case, the record transmitted to the Department is defective. The statement of the 
accused is not attached to the record of proceedings, although referred to therein as 
"annexed" "and marked E." The revising power, therefore, not being in possession 
of the whole case, the sentence is set aside, and Acting Ensign C. F. Russell will return 
to duty. 

Also in the cases of sundry petty officers and seamen. 



Circular. 

December 30, 1864. 

Regulations for the admission and advancement of volunteer line officers and 
engineers in the Mississippi Squadron : 

Acting master's mates are to be between the ages of nineteen (19) and thirty (30) 
years. If from the Atlantic States, to have seen three (3) years' service at sea as an 
officer or before the mast. If from the inland States, to have seen one (1) year's 
-service on steamers on the lakes or western rivers or in the army. 

The commander of the squadron will make all such appointments as vacancies 
occur. 

Acting ensigns are to be between the ages of twenty-one (21) and thirty-five (35). 
If from the Atlantic States, to have seen eight (8) years' service at sea as an officer 
or before the mast. If from the inland States, to have seen three (3) years' service 
on the rivers or lakes before the mast, or as a line officer on board of steamers, or 
been three (3) years in the army and been honorably discharged. The commander 
of the squadron will make appointments of Acting Ensigns according to the above 
rule, subject to the approval of the Department. Appointments to acting second 
and third assistant engineers will be made by the commander of the squadron from 
such competent and experienced persons as he shall designate, according to rules for 
examination which he will prescribe. 

Promotions above the grade of ensign and second assistant engineers to be rec- 
ommended to the Department, when vacancies occur, by the Commander-in-Chief. 
No appointments to be made to these or any other office in the gift of the Commander- 
in-Chief unless the party shall first file evidence of his citizenship, place of nativity, 
fair English education, proof of loyalty and sobriety, and have passed a physical 
examination. 

No foreigner can be appointed a line officer. No person formerly of the Naval 
School can be appointed a line officer, without the previous authority of the Navy 
Department. 

The qualifications of all appointments in the Mississippi squadron must be for- 
warded to the Department record. 



Circular. 

December 30, 1864. 

Sir: Hereafter all funds deposited by enlisted men, as security for their return 
from absence on leave, and forfeited by their desertion, and any bounty money or 
advanced pay refunded by minors or others discharged from the service, will be de- 
posited by the paymaster with the nearest assistant treasurer, the advance money to 
the credit of pay of the Navy, and the bounty and other money to the appropriation 
for naval bounties — the certificate of deposit in the case of advanced pay to be 
transmitted to the Navy Department, and in other cases to the Bureau of Equip- 
ment and Recruiting, to be sent to the 4th Auditor of the Treasury. 
I am, respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 



To Commandants of Navy Yards. 

Oeneral Order, No. 45. 

Awarding medals of honor to — 

J. Henry Denig, sergeant of marines, Brooklyn. 
Michael Hudson, sergeant of marines, Brooklyn. 
William M. Smith, and 
Miles M. Oviatt, corporals of marines, Brooklyn. 



GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 23 

Barnett Kenna, quartermaster, and 
William Hals ted, cockswain, Brooklyn. 
"Joseph Brown, quartermaster. Brooklyn. 
Joseph Irlam, seaman, Brooklyn. 
Edward Price, cockswain, Brooklyn. 
Alexander Mack, captain of top, Brooklyn. 
William Nichols, quartermaster, Brooklyn. 
Nicholas Irwin, seaman, Brooklyn. 
John Cooper, cockswain. Brooklyn. 
John Brown, captain of forecastle, Brooklyn. 
John Irving, cockswain, Brooklyn. 
William Blagdeen, ship's cook, Brooklyn. 
William Madden, coal-heaver, Brooklyn. 
James Machon, boy, Brooklyn. 
William H. Brown, landsman, Brooklyn 
James Mifflin, engineer's cook, Brooklyn. 
James E. Sterling, coal-heaver, Brooklyn. 
Richard Dennis, boatswain's mate, Brooklyn. 
Samuel W. Davis, ordinary seaman. Brooklyn. 
Samuel Todd, quartermaster, Brooklyn. 
Thomas Fitzpatrick, cockswain. Hartford. 
Charles Melville, ordinary seaman, Hartford. 
William A. Stanley, shellman, Hartford. 
William Pelham, landsman. Hartford. 
John McFarland, captain of forecastle, Hartford. 
James R. Garrison, coal-heaver, Hartford. 
Thomas O'Connell, coal-heaver, Hartford. 
Wilson Brown, landsman. Hartford. 
John Lawson, landsman, Hartford. 
Martin Freeman, pilot. Hartford. 

William Densinore, chief boatswain's mate, Richmond. 
Adam Duncan, boatswain's mate. Richmond. 
Charles Deakin, boatswain's mate. Richmond. 
Cornelius Cronin, chief quartermaster, Richmond. 
William Wells, quartermaster, Richmond. 
Hendrick Sharp, seaman. Richmond. 
Walter B. Smith, ordinary seaman, Richmond. 
George Parks, captain of forecastle, Richmond. 
Thomas Hayes, cockswain. Richmond. 
Lebbeus Simkins, cockswain, Richmond. 
Oloff Smith, cockswain. Richmond. 
Alexander H. Truett, cockswain. Richmond. 
Robert Brown, captain of top, Richmond. 
John H. .James, captain of top, Richmond. 
Thomas Gripps, quartermaster, Richmond. 
John Brazeli, quartermaster, Richmond. 
James H. Morgan, captain of top, Richmond. 
John Smith, second captain of top. Richmond. 
James B. Chandler, cockswain. Richmond. 
William Jones, captain of top. Richmond. 
William Doolen, coal-heaver, Richmond. 
James Smith, first captain of forecastle. Richmond. 
Hugh Hamilton, cockswain, Richmond. 
James Mcintosh, captain of top, Richmond. 
William M. Can, master-at-arms, Richmond. 
Thomas Atkinson, yeoman, Richmond. 

David Sprowle, orderly sergeant of Marine Guard, Richmond. 
Andrew Miller, sergeant of Marines, Richmond. 
James Martin, sergeant of Marines, Richmond. 
William Phinney, boatswain's mate. Lackawanna. 
John Smith, captain of forecastle, Lackawanna. 
Samuel W. Kinnaird, landsman. Lackawanna. 
Patrick Dougherty, landsman. Lackawanna. 
Michael Cassidy, landsman, Lackawanna. 
George Taylor, armorer, Lackawanna. 
Louis G. Chaput, landsman. Laekawauifa. 
•James Ward, quarter gunner, Lackawanna. 
Daniel Whitfield, quartermaster, Lackawanna. 
John M. Burns, seaman, Lackawanna. 

• Forfeited mo, "ml by deserting. 



24 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

John Edwards, captain of top, Lackawanna. 

Adam McCullock, seaman, Lackawanna. 

James Sheridan, quartermaster, Oneida. 

John E. Jones, quartermaster, Oneida. 

William Gardner, seaman, Oneida. 

John Preston, landsman, Oneida. 

William Newland, ordinary seaman, Oneida. 

David Naylor, landsman, Oneida. 

Charles B. Woram, ordinary seaman, Oneida. 

Thomas Kendrick, cockswain, Oneida. 

James S. Roantree, sergeant of Marines, Oneida. 

Andrew Jones, chief boatswain's mate, Chickasaw. 

James Seanor, master-at-arms, Chickasaw. 

William C. Connor, boatswain's mate, Howquah. 

Alexander Robinson, boatswain's mate, Howquah. 

Martin Howard, landsman, Tacony. 

James Tallentine, quarter gunner, Tacony. 

Eobert Graham, landsman, Tacony. 

Henry Brutsche, landsman, Tacony. 

Patrick Colbert, cockswain, Commodore Hull. 

James Haley, captain of forecastle, Kearsarge. 

John F. Rickford, captain of top, Kearsarge. 

Charles A. Read, cockswain, Kearsarge. 

William Smith, quartermaster, Kearsarge. 

William Bond, boatswain's mate, Kearsarge. 

€harles Moore, seaman, Kearsarge. 

George H. Harrison, seaman, Kearsarge. 

Thomas Perry, boatswain's mate, Kearsarge. 

John Hayes, cockswain, Kearsarge. 

George E. Read, seaman, Kearsarge. 

Robert Strahan, captain of top, Kearsarge. 

James H. Lee, seaman, Kearsarge. 

Joachim Pease (colored), seaman, Kearsarge. 

William B. Poole, quartermaster, Kearsarge. 

Michael Aheam, paymaster's steward, Kearsarge. 

Mark G. Ham, carpenter's mate, Kearsarge, 

John W. Lloyd, cockswain. Wyalusing. • 

Charles Baldwin, coal-heaver, Wyalusing. 

Alexander Crawford, fireman, Wyalusing. 

John Laverty, fireman, Wyalusing. 

Benjamin Lloyd, coal-heaver, Wyalusing. 

David Warren, cockswain, Monticello. 

William Wright, yeoman, Monticello. 

John Sullivan, seaman, Monticello. 

Robert T. Clifford, master-at-arms, Monticello. 

Thomas Harding, captain of forecastle, Dacotah. 

Perry Wilkes, pilot, Signal. 

John Hy land, seaman, Signal. 

Michael McCormick, boatswain's mate, Signal. 

Timothy O'Donoghue, seaman, Signal. 

George Butts, gunner's mate, Signal. 

Charles Asten, quarter gunner. Signal. 

John Ortega, seaman, Saratoga. 

Maurice Wagg, cockswain, Rhode Island. 

R. H. King, landsman, Picket Boat, No. 1. 

Wilkes, landsman, Picket Boat, No. 1. 

Demming, landsman, Picket Boat, No. 1. 

Bernard Harley, ordinary seaman, Picket Boat, No. 1. 
William Smith, ordinary seaman, Picket'Boat, No. 1. 
Richard Hamilton, coal-heaver, Picket Boat, No. 1. 
Edward J. Houghton, ordinary seaman, Picket Boat, No. 1. 
Oliver O'Brien, cockswain, Canandaigua. 
* Frank Lucas, cockswain, Agawam. 
William Garvin, captain of forecastle, Agawam. 
Charles J. Bibber, gunner's mate, Agawam. 
John Neil, quarter gunner, Agawam* 
Robert Montgomery, captain of afterguard, Agawam. 
James Roberts, seaman, Agawam. 
Charles Hawkins, seaman, Agawam. 

* Forfeited medal by (Inserting. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



25 



Dennis Conlan, seaman, Agawam. 
James Sullivan, ordinary seaman, Agawam. 
William Hinnegan, 2d class fireman, Agawam. 
Charles Rice, coal-heaver, Agawam. 



Circular. 

January 1, 1865. 
Sir : The pay of the crews of receiving ships and the number of men allowed in 
each rating will hereafter be in conformity with the following table: 



Bating. 



Monthly pay. 



X umber, 
Receiving Ships 

Ohio, 
North Carolina. 
and Vermont. 



Number, 
all other Receiv- 
ing Ships. 



Quai tenna&ters 

Boatswain's mat - 

Captains of holds 

Quarter gunners 

Captains after guard 

Ship's cooks 

Assistani cooks 

Master-at-arms 

Ship'.- carpenters 

< loopers 

Printers 

Ship's writers . I 

Bag-room keeper? 

Lamp cleaner- 

Carpenter's mates 

Yeomen 

Cabin stewards 

Cabin cooks i 

Wardroom stewards I 

Wardroom cooks 

Steerage stewards ! 

Steerage cooks 

Assistant ruck- 

Nurses 

Surgeon's stewards . . | 

Paymaster's stewards 

Seamen 

Ordinary seamen ... 

Landsmen \ 



*■_•:, 



20 


I 


26 


■> 




2 


30 


1 


25 


1 




2 


26 


3 


20 


I 


25 


1 


30 


2 


20 


i 


20 


i 










30 


i 




i 


30 


i 




l 


26 


i 


20 


i 


is 


i 


18 


» 


1 1 


i 


38 


i 


30 


l 


18 


i; 


16 


8 


11 


1- 



The rate of seamen on board receiving ships will he routined to old man-of-war 
men, of good character, disabled for active service* 

GIDEON WELL! 

S ' tavji of tin Navy. 
Commandant* of Navy Yard*. 



General Order, No 16. 

January 5, l s »'-~>. 

Publishing findings and sentences of Na\ al General f'onrts-Martial in the eases of — 

John G.Cunningham, acting third assistant engineer of the U. 8. 8. l'ink. pleaded 
"Guilty" to the charge of drunkenness and conduct unbecoming an officer of the 
Navy, and was sentenced "to he publicly reprimanded, to be deprived of liberty, 
and suspended from duty for three months: to be on 'leave pay." and remain on 
board the U. S. S. Potomac during the time of such suspension. " He will '»«• repri- 
manded hy the commanding officer of the squadron, who will see that the sentence 
is fully carried into execution. 

David Fadei; acting master's mate, of the l*. B. S. Release, was found guilty of 
"drunkenness," "using abusive and insulting language to a superior officer," and 
•'assaulting and striking his superior officer in execution of his duty." and sentenced 
"to be imprisoned one (1) year in such prison as the Secretary of the Navy shall des- 
ignate, and to forfeit all prize money and pay that may he due to him on the approval 
of this sentence: and that, at the expiration of such imprisonment, he he dismissed 
from the Naval service." 

He was recommended hy the Court to clemency, for that he has heen promoted for 
gallantry from the rate of seaman, and has always borne an excellent character for 
sobriety and efficiency, both as a private and an officer. 

The penalty in this case is remitted, except the loss of pay and prize money, and 
he will return to duty. 



26 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

James R. Smith, acting ensign of the U. S. S. Isonomia, was found guilty of the 
charge of " scandalous conduct, tending to the destruction of good morals,'' in that 
he took fifty dollars each from two recruits on board the receiving ship North Caro- 
lina, in consideration of his using his influence to have them transferred to the Iso- 
nomia. He was sentenced "to be dismissed from the Naval service, and to be con- 
fined for the term of six (6) months in such prison as the Secretary of the Navy may 
direct for that purpose, and to forfeit all pay and prize money now due and that 
may become due to him at the time of the approval of this sentence." The confine- 
ment in this case is remitted, and the residue of the sentence is approved. 

George Taylor, acting ensign, was found guilty of "desertion" and "fraud," in that 
he received large sums of money from recruits on board the receiving ship North 
Carolina, under pretense of depositing the same in the safe for security, but converted 
it to his own use and attempted to escape. He was sentenced "to be imprisoned at 
hard labor, for the term of five (5) years from the date of the approval of this sen- 
tence, in such prison as the Secretary of the Navy may designate for that purpose, 
and that he be dismissed from the naval service, and that he forfeit all pay now due 
or that may become due him." 

In view of the fact that he has refunded or given security for all the money thus 
fraudulently received by him, this sentence is deemed adequate, and will be carried 
into execution at the penitentiary at Albany, New York. 

All officers, on receipt of official information designating the place where sentence 
is to be carried into execution, will at once cause any prisoner or prisoners under 
their command, w r hose place of punishment is so designated, to be forwarded, under 
proper guard, and delivered over to the proper authority for that purpose. Where 
this cannot be done, the prisoner or prisoners should be forwarded to some navy yard 
or naval station in the vicinity of the place so designated, and that fact immediately 
reported to the Department. 

And in all cases a separate receipt must be taken for each prisoner delivered for 
execution of sentence, from the authority to whom he is delivered, and promptly 
forwarded to the Department. 



Circular. 

January 14, 1865. 
Uniform of a Vice- Admiral. 

The uniform of a Vice- Admiral shall be the same as that prescribed for a Rear Admiral 
in the Regulations of January 28, 1864, with the following exceptions: 

Cap ornaments. — Three silver stars, instead of two, above the gold wreath, the third 
one equi-distant from and below the others and partially covering a gold embroidered 
foul anchor placed vertically. 

Shoulder-straps. — Three silver stars, instead of two, the center one partially cover- 
ing a gold foul anchor placed nearly horizontally, the tips of one the rays passing 
through the ring of the anchor. 

Sleeve ornaments. — A strip of gold lace one inch and a half wide, with the lower edge 
an inch and a half from the end of the sleeve, and two other stripes of gold lace one- 
quarter of an inch wide, with a space of half an inch between the wide and narrow 
laces, respectively; also the gold star worn by line officers. 

Overcoat ornaments. — Three silver stars, instead of two, parallel with the ends of 
the collar. 

Change in sleeve ornaments of Rear Admirals. — The sleeve ornaments for a Rear Admiral 
shall be the same as for a Vice-Admiral, except that there shall be but one strip of 
narrow lace instead of two. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



January 27, 1865. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial, in session at the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
December 15, 1864, Eieutenant Commander Austin Pendergrast was brought to trial, 
by order of the Secretary of the Navy, upon the charge of "culpable inefficiency in 
the discharge of duty;" the specification setting forth that, on or about the 3d of 
June, 1864, the said Lieutenant Commander Austin Pendergrast, being then in com- 
mand of the U. S. steamer Water Witch, lying at anchor in Ossabaw Sound, on the 
coast of Georgia, and peculiarly exposed to attack by the enemy, did not take proper 
precautions to secure his vessel against surprise and attack by night, neither by sta- 
tioning picket boats, nor by leaving the charge of the deck in the hands of a vigilant 
and competent officer. To which charge the accused pleaded "Not guilty." So much 
of the specification as refers to the leaving of the deck in charge of an officer who 
was not vigilant nor competent is considered by the court "not proven;" all the 
remainder is found to have been "proven" and the accused is found " of the charge 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 27 

Guilty," and sentenced "to be suspended from duty for two years from the date of 
this sentence (January 16, 1865), on half-pay, with loss of rank during the period of 
his suspension. 7 - Sentence approved. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 48. 

February 14, 1865. 

Commanding officers will not permit agents or brokers to visit vessels of the Navy 
for the purpose of inducing men to sign certificates or claims for bounties or credits; 
nor will they certify to such papers, nor sign them, but refer the agents or the claims 
of the men to the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. Any person serving on 
board a national vessel who shall receive a circular or notice from any broker or 
other person inviting his co-operation in procuring credits, shall immediately deliver 
such circular or paper to the commanding officer, under penalty of court-martial. 

When a person enlists on board, and is accompanied by a state, county, or town 
agent, exhibiting authority as such, to pay the local bounty which such recruit is to 
receive, a receipt may be given the agent, signed by the recruit, and certified by the 
commanding officer; and such enlistment, with amount of local bounty paid, place 
to which credited, and whether enlisted as volunteer or substitute, immediately 
reported to Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. 

<;I1>E<)\ WELLES. 

retary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

February 20, L865. 

Accompanying this is a copy of the Book of Allowances, recently published by the 
Department, and now adopted, which will, until otherwise ordered, be observed in 
the issues to and outfits for vessels of the United States Navy. 

The prescribed allowances will not be exceeded or in any respect departed from 
except by authority of the Navy Department. The adaptation of these allowances 
to their respective purposes can be 'best determined by actual trial of them, when 
defects not now apparent may exhibit themselves. Blank leaves have therefore been 
inserted in the hook, so that any necessary changes which experience may suggest, 
or any alterations which may from time to time be authorized, may be QOted. The 
table of allowance of officers and crews has been in sonic respects modified by other 
recent regulations, and. so far as it is affected by them, will be regarded as annulled. 
The Department desires the commandants of navy yards and stations, the commanders 

of squadrons, and commanders of vessels, to communicate to the appropriate Bureau 
every three months, or oftener When the importance of the matter may demand it, 

any faults in the allowance tables, as ascertained from their actual ose, and any sug- 
gestions that would tend to perfect them. 

(HDEOft WELLES, 

n turij of the Navy. 



Circular. 

February 22, 1866, 

The instructions appended to the Circulai from this Department dated December 

22, 1863, are hereby repealed so far as relates to the length of "sea service" required 
from candidates for promotion in the grade of second and third assistant engineers 
of the United State's Navy. 

Hereafter candidates tor promotion to the grade of second assistant engineers must 
have served at least two years at sea as third assistant engineers on hoard of a naval 
steamer, to commence with the date of May 20, 1863. Candidates for promotion to 
the grade of fust assistant engineers must have Served at least three years at sea as 
second assistant engineers on hoard of a naval steamer, to commence with the date 
of April 21, 1863. And the appointments of assistant engineers, who have been exam- 
ined and passed for promotion, shall date from the completion of their sea service, 
which date shall not affect their relative positions with regard to their claw,-. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

retary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 49. March 16, 1865. 

In pursuance of the provisions of an act of Congress appro \ ed March .'>. 1865, acting 

master's mates will hereafter be styled mates. 

The pay of mates will he at the rate of forty dollars per month. After the comple- 
tion of a year's continuous service as mates, they will he paid hereafter at the rate 
of sixty dollars per month whilst on sea service.' 



28 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Mates may be rated, under authority of the Secretary of the Navy, from seamen 
and ordinary seamen who have enlisted in the naval service for not less than two 
years, and will receive the same compensation as other mates; hut such rating of an 
enlisted man, or his appointment as an officer, shall not discharge him from his 
enlistment. 

No person appointed or rated an officer or clerk in the Navy shall receive any 
bounty while holding an appointment. 

Acting passed assistant surgeons and acting surgeons may be appointed in the same 
manner as acting assistant surgeons are now appointed, who shall receive the com- 
pensation of their respective grades. 

Two years' service in the Navy as acting assistant surgeon will be required before 
examination for promotion, except under peculiar circumstances, to be judged of by 
the Department. 

No acting assistant surgeon who is more than forty years of age will be examined 
for promotion. 

An examination for promotion may be declined by an acting assistant surgeon 
without detriment to present position. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 50. April 12, 1865. 

Publishing Executive Proclamations of April 11, 1865, closing certain ports in the 
rebellious States, and denying, on certain conditions, privileges and immunities to 
vessels of war of certain nations. 



General Order, No. 51. April 15, 1865. 

The Department announces with profound sorrow to the officers and men of the 
Navy and Marine Corps the death of Abraham Lincoln, late President of the United 
States. Stricken down by the hand of an assassin on the evening of the 14th instant, 
when surrounded by his family and friends, he lingered a few hours after receiving 
the fatal wound, and died at seven o'clock twenty-two minutes this morning. 

A grateful people had given their willing confidence to the patriot and statesman 
under whose wise and successful administration the nation was just emerging from 
the civil strife which for four years has afflicted the land, when this terrible calamity 
fell upon the country. To him our gratitude was justly due, for to him, under God, 
more than to any other person, we are indebted for the successful vindication of the 
integrity of the Union and the maintenance of the pow r er of the Republic. 

The officers of the Navy and Marine Corps will, as a manifestation of their respect 
for the exalted character, eminent position, and inestimable public services of the 
late President, and as an indication of their sense of the calamity which the country 
has sustained, wear the usual badge of mourning for six months, 

The Department further directs, that, upon the day following the receipt of this 
order, the commandants of squadrons, navy yards, and stations, will cause the ensign 
of every vessel in their several commands to be hoisted at half-mast, and a gun to be 
fired every half hour, beginning at sunrise and ending at sunset. The flags of the 
several navy yards and marine barracks will also be hoisted at half-mast. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Special Order. April 17, 1865. 

Ry order of the President of the United States, the Navy Department will be closed 
on Wednesday next, the day of the funeral solemnities of the late President of the 
United States. Labor will also be suspended on that day at each of the navy yards 
and naval stations and upon all the vessels of the United States. The flags of all 
vessels and at all the navy yards and stations and marine barracks will be kept at 
half-mast during the day, and at twelve o'clock meridian twenty-one minute-guns 
will be tired by the senior officer of each squadron and the commandants of the navy 
yards and stations. 

GIDEON WELLES, 
Commanders of Stations. Secretary of the Navy. 



Special Order. April 17, 1865. 

Vice-Admiral D. C. Farragut and Rear Admiral Wm. R. Shubrick have been desig- 
nated to make the necessary arrangements on the part of the Navy and Marine Corps 
for attending, on Wednesday next, the funeral of the late President of the United 
States. 

GIDEON WELLES. 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 29 

.Special. Ordek. 

April 17, 1865. 
Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps will assemble at the Navy Department, in 
uniform, at 10 o'clock a. m. on Wednesday next, for the purpose of attending the 
funeral of the late President. 

CIDEON WELLES. 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Special Order. 

April 20, 1865. 
The following officers of the Navy and Marine Corps will accompany the remains 
of the late President from the City of Washington to Springfield, the capital of the 
State of Illinois, and continue with them until they are consigned to their final rest- 
ing place: 

Rear Admiral Charles Henry Davis. Chief Bureau Navigation: 
Captain William Rogers Taylor. U. S. Navy: 
Major Thomas Y. Field. U. 8. Marine Corps. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary <>/ the Navy. 



General Order, No. 52. 

April 15, 1865. 
Publishing the findings and sentences of Naval General Courts-Martial in the eases 

of- 

Thomas /('. King, second assistant engineer of the U. s. s. Muscoota, tried at the 
Navy Yard. New York. March 7. 1865, guilty of u absence without leave," and sen- 
tenced "to forfeit two months' pay." Approved. 

Lucius Harlow, acting third assistant engineer of the II. s. >. Granite City, tried 
by order of the Secretary of the Navy, at the Navy Yard, New York. .January ill . L866, 
upon the charges of " disloyalty " and 'conduct unbecoming an officer," of both of 
which he was found "not guilty." Finding approved. 

John Kelly, acting ensign, tried by order of the Secretary of the Navy, at the Navj 
Yard, New York, January 26, l*i>.">, gnilty of " absence without leave." and sentenced 
"to forfeit three months' pay." Approved. 

John Sloan, third assistant engineer of the l . >. s. Kensington, tried by order of 
the Secretary of the Navy, at the Navy Yard. N*-\\ York, upon the charges of "neglect 
of duty ,"" disobedience of orders." and "drunkenness," was found guilty <>t ••dis- 
obedience of orders," and sentenced " to forfeit t hue , 3) months" pay." The sentence 
is not approved. 

William Braidwood, acting first assistant engineer, I'. 8. 8. Chimo. tried 1>\ order of 
the Secretary of the Navy, at the Navy Yard at New York, February 24, 1865, guilty 
of "conduct unbecoming an officer, and subversive of good discipline," and "disobe- 
dience of the lawful order of his superior officer,*' and sentenced -'to lie dismissed 
from the naval service.'" Sentence approved. 

George Dunn, act ing ensign. Y . 8. 8. Resolute, tried bj order of the Secretary of the 
Navy, at the Navy Yard at Philadelphia, January 30, 1865, guilty of "robbery, and 
plundering an inhabitant when on shore." and "'scandalous conduct, tending to the 
destruction of good morals." and sentenced "to be reprimanded by the Secretary of 
the Navy in general orders, and To be cashiered." Sentence approved. This man 
having been dismissed by the sentence of the Court, and being now out of the service, 
no further reprimand is considered necessary, except the expression by the Depart- 
ment of its full and entire approval of the finding and sentence of the Court. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant W. 11. Brown, 1'. 8. 8. Restless, tried by order of Act- 
ing Rear Admiral Stribling, E. Gulf Squadron, December .">. 1864, guilty of "publicly 
reprimanding an officer while in discharge of his duty," "embezzlement of the prop- 
erty of the United States." and "scandalous conduct, tending to the destruction of 
good morals.*' Sentenced "to he dismissed the service.'" A recommendation to mercy 
was made in this case to the revising authority by the members of the Court, based 
upon the previous good conduct of the accused, and their belief that in his case there 
was more of ignorance than malice or criminal intent, and also that the charges were 
made in a malevolent and vindictive spirit. The evidence in the case clearly show- 
ing that the recommendation was well founded, the sentence is set aside. 

Robert Wood, acting master's mate, U. S. S. Arthur, tried by order of Com. Palmer, 
W. G. B. Squadron, January 2, 1865, guilty of "drunkenness" and "scandalous con- 
duct, tending to the destruction of good morals." Sentenced "to be confined with- 
out pay, in such penitentiary as the Secretary of the Navy may direct, for the term 
of six months, and, at the expiration of that time, to be dishonorably discharged 



30 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

from the Navy." The Department is compelled to disapprove this sentence. The 
charges are not for offenses which can be punished by imprisonment in a peniten- 
tiary. Sentence set aside. 

Levi Bobbin*, acting third assistant engineer, U. S. S. Rodolph, tried by order of 
Com. Palmer, W. G. B. Squadron, January 4, 1865, guilty of ''drunkenness," " assault- 
ing another person in the Navy," and "treating with contempt his superior officer." 
Sentenced " to be confined for six (6) months in any penitentiary the Secretary of the 
Navy may select, without pay, and to be dishonorably discharged from the Navy at 
the expiration of his term of confinement." This is another of the cases where the 
sentence is to the penitentiary for an offense not capital. Sentence set aside. 

And in the cases of sundry petty officers and seamen. 



General Order, No. 53. 

May 10, 1865. 
Publishing Executive Order of April 29, 1865, removing restrictions upon internal, 
domestic, and coastwise commercial intercourse in certain States. 



General Order, No. 54. 

May 11, 1865. 
Publishing Executive Orders of May 9, 1865. to re-establish the authority of the 
United States and execute the laws within the State of Virginia, and May 10, 1865, 
in relation to rebel cruisers. 



General Order, No. 55. 

May 24, 1865. 
Publishing Executive Order of May 22, 1865, opening certain ports to foreign com- 
merce. 



General Order, No. 56. 

May 30, 1865. 

A Naval General Court-Martial having found William F. Simes, of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, a naval contractor and the senior member of the firm of William F. 
Simes & Son, guilty of fraud upon the United States, and "willful neglect of duty," 
said Court did impose the following sentence: 

"The Court do therefore sentence the accused, Wm. F. Simes, to pay to the United 
States the sum of two thousand ($2,000) dollars; and that he be confined in such 
prison or place of confinement as may be designated by the Hon. Secretary of the 
Navy until the said fine is paid ; and also that he be hereafter excluded from any 
further deliveries, either under contract or open purchase, of naval supplies." 

The attention of purchasing agents and naval storekeepers is called to the last 
clause of the above sentence. 

G. V. FOX, 
Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 57. 

June 9, 1865. 

Publishing the findings and sentences of Naval General Courts-Martial in the 
cases of — 

George W. Shallenberger, acting 2d assistant engineer of the U. S. S. Forest Rose, 
was found guilty of "overstaying his leave of absence," and sentenced "to be de- 
prived of further leave of absence during the war." This penalty was remitted by 
Acting Rear-Admiral Lee upon the recommendation of the Court. 

Thomas C. Ridgely, acting 2d assistant engineer of the U. S. S. Cricket, after hav- 
ing been found not guilty by the Court, was sentenced "to be dishonorably dismissed 
from the naval service of the United States." 

A sentence so evidently illegal, in view of the finding, is of course set aside. 

Acting Ensign John Sullivan, of the U. S. S. Fawn, was acquitted by the Court of 
the charge of theft which had been preferred against him, finding that the various 
articles alleged to have been stolen by him had been regularly paid for. 

Acting 3d Assistant Engineer Nathan Spear, of the U. S. S. Tensas, was found guilty 
of "absence without leave" and "neglect of duty," by a Naval General Court-Martial 
held on board the U. S. S. Peosta, April 17, 1865, aud sentenced "to be confined to his 
vessel for the term of six months on duty, and to receive during that time one-half 
the pay of an acting 2d assistant engineer/ 7 which sentence was remitted by Acting 
Rear-Admiral Lee. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 31 

William Leonard, acting 3d assistant engineer of the U. S. S. Lodono, was found 
guilty of u treating with contempt his superior officer, and drunkenness/' and sen- 
tenced "to he confined in such place other than a prison as the Secretary of the Navy 
may direct, for the term of one year; to forfeit all pay now due or that may become 
due him during his confinement, and at the end of his confinement to he dismissed 
from the naval service." Owing to his long confinement, this sentence is remitted. 

The same General Court-Martial also found Acting Volunteer Lieutenant J.A.Pen- 
nel guilty of. " inflicting illegal punishment,'* and sentenced him "to he suspended 
from duty on half-pay for three months; to he confined during that time on any 
United .States vessel the Secretary of the Navy may designate, and at the end of that 
time to be dismissed the naval service." 

The action of the Court is approved, but so much of the sentence as imposes sus- 
pension and confinement is remitted, and he is dismissed from the naval service. 

Acting Assistant Surgeon John F. Henry, of the U. S. S.Delaware, was found guilty 
of "scandalous conduct" and "culpable inefficiency in the performance of duty,'' 
and sentenced "to forfeit all pay and subsistence now due, and to be dismissed from 
the Navy." which sentence is approved. 

Acting Volunteer Lieuterfant Thomas Pickering^ of the V. S. S. Fort Donelson, guilty 
of ''culpable inefficiency in the performance of duty" and "drunkenness," and sen- 
tenced "to be dismissed the service," which sentence is approved. 

Acting Ensign John W, Leu-is, U. S. S. Commodore Hull, guilty of "drunkenness" 
and "conduct unbecoming an officer." was sentenced '"to be confined tor one year in 
any place that the Secretary of the Navy may direct other than a common prison; 
to lose all pay now due or that may become due him, except sufficient to cover his 
actual expenses; and, at the expiration of imprisonment, to he dishonorably dis- 
missed the service." The action of the Court is approved, but the imprisonment is 
remitted, and Acting Ensign Joli n W. L< ici* is dismissed from the naval service with 
loss of all pay. 

Acting dinner William H. Herring, of the V. S. S. Mattahesset t. guilty of "treating 
with contempt his superior officer" and "drunkenness," was sentenced "to he con- 
fined in such place other than a prison as the Secretary of the Navy may direct, for 
the term of one year; to be allowed only snob portion of his pay as may he actually 
necessary for his support — all the rest to be forfeited, and he to he dishonorably dis- 
missed." , 

The proceedings and findings of the Court are approved, hut the imprisonment in 
this case is i emitted, and Acting Gunner William 11. Herring is dismissed from the 
naval service with loss of all pay. 

Acting 2d Assistant Engineer a . Edgar Allen having been charged with " cowardice," 
in that he kept out of danger at the time of the capture of the U.S. 8. u Underwriter," 
and with "falsehood," in the report made by him to his superior officer concerning 
the affair, was tried by order of the Department by a Naval (ieneral Court-Martial, 
at the navy yard, New York, and acquitted. 

And in the cases of sundry petty officers and seamen. 



General Order, No. 58. 

June 20, 1st if,. 
At a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the navy yard, New York, October 

19, 1861, Lieutenant Commander George .1. si, ,-, ne, of the Navy, was tried on the fol- 
lowing charge and specification: 
Charge. — "'Failing to do his utmost to overtake and capture or destroy a vessel 

which it was his duty to encounter." 

Specification — "In this: that between the 12th and 18th days of August, in the year 

1864, the said Lieutenant Commander (iconic A. Stevens, being then in command 

of the l T . S. steamer Pontoosuck, at sea, under orders to cruise in search of the 

piratical steamer Tallahassee, did twice return from said cruise to ports in the 

United States unnecessarily, and remain in port without necessity, fust at 

Portland, on or about the loth of August, and again at Eastport, on or about 

the 17th day of August, thus discontinuing and suspending his search for the 

said piratical vessel, and failing to do his utmost to overtake the said vessel." 

Upon this charge and specification the finding of the Court was as follows: 

"That the specification of the charge is proven, with the exception of the word 

'unnecessarily,' as it occurs in the ninth line of the specification : that the accused, 

Lieutenant Commander George A. St, reus, of the U. S. Navy, is guilty of the charge. 

And the Court do therefore sentence and adjudge the said Lieutenant Commander 

George ./. Stevens, of the U. S. Navy, to be. suspended for one year, with the loss of 

six months' pay, from the date of this sentence." 



32 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

The offense committed by Lieutenant Commander Stevens was of the gravest char- 
acter — one of the capital offenses — on conviction of which a Court-Martial is author- 
ized to pass the sentence of death. The Court do not find it proved that he returned 
to port unnecessarily, hut that he remained in port without necessity, on two several 
occasions, at a time when duty called him most urgently to he at sea. A 'formidable 
piratical vessel was known to be then within a short distance of our coast, pursuing 
a triumphant career of plunder and destruction, and the calls of public opinion, 
amounting to clamor, invoked the assistance of the Navy, and even directed the at- 
tention of the Department to this particular officer, who was enjoying his ease in 
port while his orders and every consideration of patriotism and of self-respect re- 
quired him to he at sea. A more flagrant case of delinquency , and one coming more 
completely within the purview of the law, could not well occur. Yet the public is 
to be informed that a court of officers of the Navy consider this capital offense, at- 
tended by no circumstances of mitigation, sufficiently punished by suspension for 
six months without pay, and with pay for the same period, the latter being equiva- 
lent to leave of absence for six months. 

The Department declines to outrage public opinion and its own sense of justice, 
or to mislead the younger officers of the Navy, by approving a sentence so glaringly 
inadequate. 

Lieutenant Commander Stevens is hereby relieved from arrest. 



At a Naval General Court-Martial convened on board the United States steamer 
Baltimore, in James river, Va., March 18, 1865, Commander William A. Parker, of the 
Navy, was tried on the following charges and specifications: 
Charge I. — "Violation of the ninth section of article third of the Rules for the 

government of the Navy." 
Specification 1st — "In this: that on or about the twenty-fourth day of January, 
eighteen hundred and sixty -five, the said Commander William A. Parker, at 
that time commanding the division of James river, and being on board the U. 
S. S. Onondaga, then lying below and near to certain obstructions which had 
been placed in James river to impede the progress of rebel vessels in coming 
down the river, reliable information having been given him that vessels be- 
longing to the rebels were coming down the river and were engaged in remov- 
ing said obstructions, did withdraw himself, and did order the U. S. S. Onon- 
daga to move down the river out of all exposure to danger from the vessels of 
the rebels, and from their batteries and guns on shore, thereby allowing the 
said obstructions to be in part removed, the purpose and design of said ob- 
structions to be defeated, and the vessels of the rebels to pass and repass the 
point so obstructed, to the great peril of the property of the United States 
and of the safety of its military forces, therein withdrawing from and keep- 
ing out of danger to which he should have exposed himself." 
Specification 2d — "In this: that on or about the second day of December, eighteen 
hundred and sixty-four, the said Commander William A. Parke*-, then and from 
. that day until the twenty-fourth day of January, eighteen hundred and sixty- 
five, being in command of a certain division of the North Atlantic Squadron, 
known as the Division of James River, and having received from Rear Admiral 
David D. Porter, then commanding said squadron, orders in these words: 'The 
picket boats must always be kept in readiness at night, with their torpedoes 
ready for instant service, and if an iron-clad should come down they must 
destroy her even if they are all sunk. For this purpose you must select men of 
nerve to command them, who will undertake anything, no matter how des- 
perate;; did not obey said specific orders, nor any one of them, thus failing 
properly to observe the orders of his commanding officer and use his utmost 
exertions to carry them into execution when ordered to prepare for battle. 77 
Charge II. — "Failing to do his utmost to overtake and capture or destroy a vessel 

which it was his duty to encounter." 
Specification — " In this: that on or about the twenty -fourth day of January, eighteen 
hundred and sixty-five, the said Commander William A. Parker, then command- 
ing the Navy Division of James River, knowing that certain vessels of the 
enemy were coming down the James river and towards the point where he then 
was, did order the U. S. S. Onondaga, on board of which vessel he then was, 
to b$ moved down the river and away from the vessels of the enemy, for the 
discreditable purpose of avoiding an encounter with said vessels. 7 ' 
In this case the Court found that so much of the second specification of the first 
charge as sets forth that the accused disobeyed orders in not entrusting the com- 
mand to men of nerve, was not proved; and that so much of the specification of the 
second charge as sets forth that he moved down the river "for the discreditable pur- 
pose of avoiding an encounter with the enemy, 77 was not proved. With these excep- 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 33 

tioiis the specifications were found proved: the accused was found guilty of both 
charges, and sentenced "to be dismissed from the Navy of the United States." 

Appended to the sentence is a recommendation to clemency, subscribed by the 
members composing the Court, with one exception. This recommendation is given, 
they state, "in consideration of the long service of Commander William J. Parker 
throughout an official career of thirty three years, and believing that he acted i)i thin 
case from an error of judgment." 

The action of the Court in this case ha* somewhat embarrassed the Department. 
The second of the charges preferred against Commander Parker is one of a most 
general and comprehensive character. The ways in which an officer might fail to 
do his utmost to encounter and capture or destroy an enemy's vessel are innumera- 
ble; and as the right to a specification in all cases is secured to the accused by ex- 
press enactment, it was deemed proper on the part of the prosecution, particularly 
as the olfense charged was capital, to specify the precise manner in which Commander 
Parker had failed to do his utmost on the occasion which led to hie trial. It was 
accordingly charged that he had given a certain order for the discreditable purpose 
of avoiding an encounter with the enemy. This was the specific allegation against 
which he was called upon to defend himself. The Court have found this allegation 
not proved, and have thus virtually acquitted the accused of the charge of avoiding 
an encounter with the enemy. 

The facts averred in the specification of the second charge, so far as they are 
found proved by the Court, are compatible with entire innocence on the part of the 
accused of any crime, whether moral or merely statutory. These facts are therefore 
insufficient in themselves to prove guilt. Vet tin- Court have found him guilty; and 
must have inferred the guilt from facts not set forth in the specification, but which 
ought, in conformity with law. to have been set forth, beinn materia] facts neces- 
sary to constitute guilt. 

All the allegations in the specification, against which the accused was warned to 
defend himself, air; either disproved or are insufficient to prove guilt, and he is found 
guilty upon allegations of which he was not informed, and which are not even stated 
in the finding of the Court for the information of the revising power. The legality 
of such a rinding is too questionable to be lightly admitted to establish a precedent. 

It is to be inferred from the opinion of the individual members of the Court, a« 
stated in their recommendation to clemency, that the sole offense of' Commander 
Parker, at least under the second charge, was "error of judgment." The Depart- 
ment is at a loss to understand whether the Court considered --error of judgment 1 ' 
a crime in itself, or, under some circumstances, a valid defense against a proved 
crime. Neither position can be sanctioned by the Department. The findings of the 
Court under the second charge and its specification are not approved: and as the 
sentence, resting on the findings under both charges, cannot now be modified, it is 
necessarily set aside, and Commander Parker is hereby relieved from arrest. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

< tar;/ of thr Xavij. 



ChGNERAL OkDEH. NO. 59. 

.hau 22, 1865. 
Awarding medals of honor to — 

John Saunders, signal quartermaster, Kearsarge. 
James Horton, gunner's mate, Montauk. 
John Rountry, first-class fireman Montauk. 
John H. Ferrell, pilot, Neosho. 
John Ditzenbach, quartermaster, Neosho. 
Thos. Taylor, cockswain, Metacomet. 
Patrick Mullen, boatswain's mate, Wyandauk. 
Aaron Anderson (colored), landsman. Wyandank. 
Charles H. Smith, cockswain, Rhode Island. 
Hugh Logan, captain of the after guard, Rhode Island. 
Lewis A. Horton, seaman, Rhode Island. 
George Moore, seaman, Rhode Island. 
Luke M. Griswold, ordinary seaman, Rhode Island. 
John Jones, landsman, Rhode Island. 
George Pyne, seaman, Magnolia. 
Thomas Smith, seaman, Magnolia. 
Charles Reed, ordinary seaman, Magnolia. 
John S. Lann, landsman, Magnolia. 
George Schutt, cockswain, Hendrick Hudson. 
John Mack, seaman, Hendrick Hudson. 
John H. Nibbe, quartermaster, Petrel. 
Othniel Tripp, chief boatswain's mate, Seneca. 
3 



34 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

John Griffiths, captain of the forecastle, Santiago de Cuba. 

Edward Swatton, seaman, Santiago de Cuba. 

John Swanson, seaman, Santiago de Cuba. 

Phillip Bazaar, ordinary seaman, Santiago de Cuba. 

George Province, ordinary seaman, Santiago de Cuba. 

Augustus Williams, seaman, Santiago de Cuba. 

Auzella Savage, ordinary seaman, Santiago de Cuba. 

* John Jackson, ship's corporal, Pontoosuc. 
Robert M. Blair, boatswain's mate, Pontoosuc. 
Anthony Williams, sailmaker's mate, Pontoosuc. 
James W. Verney, chief quartermaster, Pontoosuc. 
Asa Betham, cockswain, Pontoosuc. 

John P. Erickson, captain of the forecastle, Pontoosuc. 
"* Clement Dees, seaman (colored), Pontoosuc. 
George W. McWilliams, landsman, Pontoosuc. 
John Angling, boy, Pontoosuc. 
William Dunn, quartermaster, Monadnock. 
Robert Summers, chief quartermaster, Ticonderoga. 
Jos. B. Hayden, quartermaster, Ticonderoga. 
Isaac N. Fry, orderly sergeant Marines, Ticonderoga. 
Ed. R. Bowman, quartermaster, Ticonderoga. 
William Shipman, cockswain, Ticonderoga. 
Wm. G. Taylor, Captain forecastle, Ticonderoga. 
George Prance, captain main top, Ticonderoga. 
Thomas Jones, cockswain. Ticonderogo. 
William Campbell, boatswain's mate, Ticonderogo. 
Charles Mills, seaman, Minnesota. 
Thomas Connor, ordinary seaman, Minnesota. 
David L. Bass, seaman, Minnesota. 
Franklin L. Wilcox, ordinary seaman, Minnesota. 
Thomas Harcourt, ordinary seaman, Minnesota. 
Guidon H. Baiter, landsman, Minnesota. 
John Rannahan, corporal of Marines. Minnesota. 
John Shivers, private marine, Minnesota. 
Henry Thompson, private marine, Minnesota. 
Henry S. Webster, landsman, Susquehanna. 
A. J. Tomlin, corporal Marines, Wabash. 
Albert Burton, seaman, Wabash. 
L. C. Shepard, ordinary seaman, Wabash. 
Chas. H. Foy, signal quartermaster, Rhode Island. 
James Barnum, boatswain's mate, New Ironsides. 
John Dempster, cockswain, New Ironsides. 
Edmund Hatfee, quarter gunner, New Ironsides. 
Nicholas Lear, quartermaster, New Ironsides. 
Daniel S. Milliken, quarter gunner, New Ironsides. 
Richard Willis, cockswain, New Ironsides. 
Joseph White, cockswain, New Ironsides. 
Thomas English, signal quartermaster, New Ironsides. 

* Charles Robinson, chief boatswain's mate, Galena. 

* John Martin, boatswain's mate, Galena. 
Thomas Jordan, quartermaster, Galena. 
Edward B. Young, cockswain, Galena. 
Edward Martin, quartermaster, Galena. 
John G. Morrison, cockswain, Carondelet. 

* Medal forfeited by his desertion. 



Circular Letter. 

June 24, 1865. 
The North and South Atlantic Squadrons have been consolidated, and hereafter 
will be known as the Atlantic Squadron, under the command of Acting Rear Ad- 
miral Wm. Radford. 

Respectfully, GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Chiefs of Bureaus, Navy Department. 

General Order, No. 60. 

June 26, 1865. 
Publishing Executive Proclamations of June 13, June 23, and June 24, 1865, re- 
moving restrictions upon trade, opening ports, &c. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 35 

General Order, No. 61. 

June 24, 1865. 

Publishing findings and sentences of Naval General Courts-Martial in the cases of — 

Lewis J. Marshall, mate of the U. S. S. Cricket, was tried April 19, 1865, and found 
guilty of "leaving his station before being regularly relieved" and "drunkenness,' 7 
and sentenced " to be reduced to the rate of ordinary seaman for two years." The 
sentence of disrating officers is provided as the penalty in cases of "absence with- 
out leave," and should be imposed in no other cases. Sentence set aside. 

Henry Miller, acting 2d assistant engineer of U. S. S. Great Western, was tried 
May 5, 1865, and found guilty of "absence without leave," '* disobedience of orders," - 
and "selling liquor to persons in the naval Service," and sentenced "to be confined 
for one year in any penitentiary the Secretary of the Navy may designate, to be dis- 
gracefully dismissed from the naval service of the United States at the expiration 
of his term of imprisonment, and to forfeit all pay now due or that may hereafter 
become due to him, except so much as will enable him to pay the mess-bill con- 
tracted by him on board the Great Western." All of this penalty was remitted by 
Acting Rear Admiral Lee except the dismissal. In view of his long confinement the 
entire sentence is remitted. 

P. J. Stone, acting assistant paymaster, U. S. S. Hastings, was tried May 22, 1865, 
found guilty of "disobedience of orders," " unofiicerlike conduct,'* and "making 
and publishing false, scandalous, and injurious charges," in that he wrote and fur- 
nished for publication, in the Army and Navy Journal, an article which must neces- 
sarily reflect upon worthy officers of the Navy, and which was done in violation of 
a General Order of the Department, and was sentenced " to be dismissed the service." 
Upon recommendation of the Court this sentence is entirely remitted, and Mr. .Stone 
censured and returned to duty. 

Ezra P. Pope, mate, U. S. S. Vanderbilt, was tried June 9, 1865, found guilty of 
"disobedience of orders," and sentenced "to be suspended from duty foi six months, 
and forfeit all pay now due or that shall become due him during his suspension." 
Approved. 

And in the cases of sundry petty officers and seamen. 



General Order, No. 62. 

June 29, 1865. 

The following-named persons having had medals of honor awarded to them for 
distinguished services in battle, and having again performed acts which, if they had 
not received that distinction, would have entitled them to it, are hereby authorized, 
agreeably to article XIX, Navy Regulations, to wear a bai attached to the ribbon by 
which the medal is suspended, viz: 

John Cooper, quartermaster on Acting Hear Admiral Thatcher's staff. 

Patrick Mullen, boatswain's mate, V. S. S. Don. * 

The first named was awarded a medal for gallantry on the Brooklyn, in Mobile 
Bay, August 5, 1864 ; the other for gallantry on an expedition up Mattox Creek, Va.. 
March 17, 1865. 



Circular Letter. 

June 29, 1865. 
Sir: The reduction of the Navy causes a large accumulation of stores taken from 
the vessels put out of commission. You will therefore forbid the making out of 
requisitions for stores for vessels fitting out while there are any on hand that can 
possibly be made to answer. You will call the attention of officers under your com- 
mand to the above, and enjoin upon them the utmost economy. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 
To Commandants of Xavy Yards. 



Circular Letter. 

June 29, 1865. 
Sir: All requisitions for purchases to be made in open market must, before such 
purchase is made, be submitted to the respective Bureaus for inspection. The requi- 
sition must be in duplicate, and accompanied by an explanation of the uses and the 
necessity for the purchase. 

Very respectfully, GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of Hie Xavy. 
To Commandants of Xavy Yards. 



36 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Circular Letter. 

June 29, 1865. 
Hereafter neither open purchases of bunting nor the flags prescribed in the Book 
of Allowances will be made except upon requisitions which have been submitted to 
the Bureau of Navigation and received its approval. 

Very respectfully, GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Commandants of Navy Yards. 



General Order, No. 63. 

July 17, 1865. 
Publishing findings and sentences of Naval General Courts-Martial in the cases of 
sundry petty officers and seamen. 



General Order, No. 64. 

July 19, 1865. 

The "Act to provide a more efficient discipline for the Navy," approved March 2, 
1855, makes it the duty of every commanding officer of a vessel of the Navy, on 
returning from a cruise, "to forward, immediately on his arrival in port, to the Secre- 
tary of the Navy, a list of the names of such of the crew who enlisted for three years 
as, in his opinion, on being discharged, are entitled to an 'honorable discharge' as a 
testimony of fidelity and obedience;'" and the act provides that if any seaman, ordi- 
nary seaman, landsman, or boy, shall re-enlist for three years within three months 
after receiving an honorable discharge, he shall be entitled to an extra alloAvance of 
three months' pay. 

By a subsequent act the benefit of an " honorable discharge" is extended to firemen 
and coal-heavers. 

It is due to persons enlisted in the naval service, and to the interests of the service, 
that these laws, intended to encourage fidelity and obedience in the discharge of 
duty, should be faithfully observed. The Department cannot permit the purpose of 
the law to be defeated, and the promises held out by it rendered illusory and decep- 
tive, by the negligence of commanding officers. 

In the case of the "Valley City," recently returned from a cruise under the com- 
mand of Acting Master John A. J. Brooks, the list of men entitled to an honorable 
discharge was not transmitted to the Department until more than a fortnight after 
the discharge of the crew. Men entitled to an honorable discharge received a mere 
certificate of discharge, and even the discharge given to them was in violation of the 
regulation (paragraph 775), which requires that "every discharge paper, Avhether 
honorable or otherwise," shall contain a descriptive list of the person discharged. 
In consequence of this neglect of duty on the part of their commanding officer the 
men were subjected to the expense of traveling to the seat of government in order to 
obtain the discharges to which they were entitled. 

For this disregard of law and violation of the regulation, Acting Master John A.J. 
Brooks is dismissed from the service, and will, from this date, cease to be regarded 
as an officer of the Navv. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. July 20, 1865. 

In the matter of quarters for officers at navy yards, the Department makes the fol- 
lowing decision : 

1. The quarters hereafter assigned to line officers attached to navy yards for yard 
duty will be occupied by such officers, they taking choice according to rank. 

2. Staff officers attached to navy yards for yard duty will occupy the quarters 
hereafter assigned to such officers respectively. 

3. Officers on ordnance duty now occupying quarters to which line officers attached 
to the yard for duty are entitled by this decision will be allowed to remain in the 
same until their detachment from such duty. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. July 24, 1865. 

The Circular of the Department issued on the 20th instant, relative to quarters in 
navy yards, is hereby amended as follows: Warrant officers and masters not in the 
line of promotion attached to navy yards for yard duty will occupy the quarters 
heretofore assigned to such officers. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 37 

Circular. 

July 27, 1865. 
Sir: The following regulations will hereafter be observed: 

1. All requisitions for open purchases, as already ordered, will be forwarded to the 
proper Bureau for approval, and when returned the purchasing paymaster will pro- 
cure only those items the estimated cost of which is under $100, reserving the remainder 
until the 25th of each month, upon which day he will advertise in at least two com- 
mercial newspapers, for three successive days, for proposals for furnishing such supplies. 

On the first day of the succeeding month the bids will be opened, and the lowest 
bidders notified to make immediate deliveries, unless the price is so exorbitant as to 
render it advisable to reject the bids altogether, which will be done if it is apparent 
that they are much above the market price. 

2. The Chiefs of Bureaus will closely scrutinize such requisitions, and decline to 
approve those that are considered unnecessary, or where the variation from the con- 
tract article is so trivial that the latter will serve the purpose intended. 

3. No requisition for open purchases will be considered approved until it has the 
endorsement of the naval storekeeper that the articles required are not in the public 
store and an- not due upon an existing contract. 

4. No requisitions will be made for articles under contract which shall have expired, 
or after the close of the fiscal year, and no deliveries upon any contract will be received 
unless requisition for the same shall have been made upon or prior to such termination. 

Very respectfully, 

(4IDEON WELLES, 

v r,-i Inn/ n/ the Xavy. 
To Paymasters Xavy Yard* and Chiefs of Bureaus. 



Circular. 

July SI, 1886. 

The regulations for the uniform of the United States Navy, approved January 28, 
1864, are hereby altered and amended, so far as they relate to she uniform of mid- 
shipmen, in the following respects, viz: 

Cap ornaments. — The gold wreath is abolished, and in the place thereof midshipmen 
will wear a plain anchor one inch and a quarter in length, embroidered in gold, and 
in a vertical position. 

Jacket. — To have a standing collar one inch and a quarter high, with a plain anchor 
one inch and a quarter in length, embroidered in gold, and in ;i horizontal position 
on eacb end of the collar. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Si an tary of tin Xavy. 



Augusi 1 1, ist;r>. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the oavj yard, Philadelphia, June 
16, 1865, Acting Ensign William Hunter, of the V. s. s. Nansemond, was found guilty 
of "cruelty, oppression, and maltreatment of those subject to his orders." The spe- 
cification sets forth that the accused ordered William 11. Strange, a landsman, to be 
triced up with his hands behind him, and two heavy solid shot to 1..- slung by a cord 
about his Deck, and kepi in this position for more than an hour, and that during the 
greater part of this time he was gagged. These allegations having been tally proven, 
the Court, on the 26th day of July, 1865, imposed the following sentence: "To be 
imprisoned for the term of two years, in such prison as the Secretary of the Navy 
shall designate; to forfeit all pay now due and BUCh as shall become due to him dining 
his imprisonment, and, at the expiration of said term, to he dishonorably dismissed 
the naval service, and forever after disqualified from holding any place or employ- 
ment in the Navy of the United States, " which sentence is approved, and will be 
carried into execution at the navy yard, Boston, Mass. 

GIDEON WELLES. 

Seen tary of th< Xavy. 



General Order, No. 66. September 1, 186.">. 

Printed by mistake as No. 65. Superseded by paragraph 48, page 361, Regulation 
Circular, No. 2. 



Circular. Oetobev 7, 1865. 

Application to till the position of master-workman in any of the navy yards will 
hereafter be addressed to the Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, stating the 
name, age, and residence of the applicant, with testimonials as to his character, 
habits, professional skill and competency, and physical ability. 



38 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Whenever a vacancy shall occur in the office of master, a Board will be convened 
;at the navy yard where such vacancy exists, under the direction of the Secretary of 
the Navy, and a selection will he made from the qualified candidates who shall 
have passed a satisfactory examination. 

The selection of master-workman will hereafter he made irrespective of locality ,,— - 
no district or State being entitled to preference for these positions. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

October 24, 1865. 
The Department, as well as officers of the Navy, have in many instances been sub- 
jected to much inconvenience and extra expense in consequence of the weekly re- 
ports from the navy yards representing that vessels would be ready for their officers 
weeks and sometimes months in advance of the time when they proved so. 

Hereafter no vessel will be reported as ready for officers until she is in a condition 
to receive them on board to mess. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Commandants of Navy Yards. 



Circular. 

November 3, 1865. 

Official information has been received of the removal by Her Majesty's govern- 
ment of the restrictions heretofore imposed on vessels of war of the United States 
entering the ports or visiting the waters of Great Britain, and Her Majesty's gov- 
ernment have expressed a desire that unlimited hospitality and friendship shall be 
shown to vessels of war of the United States in all Her Majesty's ports, whether at 
home or abroad 

The Department makes known to commanding officers of the United States Navy 
this action of Her Majesty's government, and at the- same time countermands the 
instructions heretofore given to them in regard to their vessels to British ports and 
their intercourse with British naval vessels, and directs that the customary hospi- 
tality and courtesy between friendly nations be shown to the navy of Great Britain. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Commanders of Squadrons. 



Circular. 

November 3, 1865. 

Requisitions for stores, furniture, and other articles that are perishable and can be 
readily purchased will not be made for vessels that have been ordered to be re- 
paired and placed in ordinary, but only for vessels that are ordered to be fitted for 
immediate service at sea; and no requisition will be made without first ascertain- 
ing whether similar articles to those wanted are not on hand at the yard available 
for use. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Commandants of Navy Yards. 



Circular. 

November 29, 1865. 
In all cases of advertising for articles to be procured in open market under the cir- 
cular of the Department of the 27th of July last, a printed copy or a slip of the adver- 
tisement must be forwarded to each Bureau having articles embraced. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
'To Purchasing Paymasters. 



December 5, 1865. 

Lieutenant Colonel Ward Martian, of the U. S. Marine Corps, was brought to trial 
before a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the Navy Department, November 
1, 1865, upon the following charge and specification, viz : 
Charge. — " Scandalous conduct tending to the destruction of good morals." 
Specificatwn — "In this: that the said Ward Marston, a lieutenant colonel in the U. S. 
Marine Corps, having received large sums of money belonging to enlisted men 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 39 

of the Marine Corps, as deposits made with him by them for safe keeping, 
while he, the said Ward Marston, was the commanding officer in charge of the 
Marine fiarracks, Boston, Mass., during the year 1864, did misapply the same to 
his own use; and when afterward, on the 23d day of January, 1865, he was 
directed by the colonel commandant, Jacob Zeilin, his superior officer, to turn 
over the money in his hands and possession so deposited as above stated, he 
was unable to account for the sum of eight thousand ($8,000) dollars which he 
had so received." 
To the above charge and specification the accused pleaded " Guilty." and the Court 
imposed the following sentence: "Thai the accused. Lieut. Col. Ward Marston, be dis- 
missed from the Marine Corps and utterly disqualified to have or hold any office or employ- 
ment in the service of the United States, and to forfeit all pa}/ and emoluments note due Mm." 
The record of proceedings in this case having been submitted to the President, he 
has returned the same to the Department with the following endorsement: 

Executive Mansion, 

November 20, 1865. 
"The sentence of the General Court-Martial in the case of Lieutenant Colonel 
Ward Marston, U. S. Marine Corps, is so far modified that the said Lieutenant Colonel 
Ward Marston be reprimanded by the Hon. Secretary of the Navy in General Orders; 
that he be Suspended for three years: and that one-half of his retired pay be de- 
ducted until the whole delinquency is canceled." 

The extract from the record already given is the best reprimand which the nature 
of the case admits of; for if there be any orticer in the naval or marine service who 
is so unmindful of his duty and his honor as to commit the offense To which Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Marston has plead guilty, he would not be benefited by any reprimand 
which the Department might administer. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Sim far;/ of the Xavy. 



General Order, No. 68. December 6, 1865. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the Xavy Department, in the city 

of Washington, November 7, 1865, Commodore Thomas T. Craven, of the Navy, was 

tried on the following charge and specification, viz: 

Change. — Failing to do his utmost to overtake and capture or destroy a vessel which 
it was his duty to encounter. 

Specification — In this: that on or about the twenty-fourth day of March, eighteen 
hundred and sixty -five, the said Commodore Thomas T. Craven, commanding 
the U. S. 8. Niagara, and having under his control the V. 8. 8. Sacramento, 

then lying oil' ( 'or n n:i. on t he coast of Spain , and a \ esse] of the enemy, known 
as the Stonewall, being at thai time on its way mil of the bay of Corufia. as 
was plainly seen by and well known to him. did tail to use any exertions or 
make any effort whatever to overtake and capture <»r destroy the said vessel of 
the enemy, as it was his duty to have done; but did remain quietly at anchor 
for more than twenty-four hours after having seen said vessel on its way out 
of the bay of Corufia; his pretext for this failure in duty being that "the odds 
in her (the Stonewall's) favor were too great and too certain to admit of the 
slightest hope of being able to intlict upon her even the most trilling injury;" 
and that, had he gone into an engagement, "the Niagara would most undoubt- 
edly have been easily ami promptly destroyed;" and, as subsequently stated 
by him in an official letter addressed " to t he Hon. II. J. Perry, charge d'A Hairs, 
Madrid." and dated March 25, L865, "with feelings that no one can appreciate, 
I was obliged to undergo the deep humiliation of knowing thai she (the Stone- 
wall) was there — steaming back and forth — flaunting her flags and waiting for 
me to go out to the attack. / dared not do it! The condition of the sea was 
such that it Mould have been perfect madness foi me to go out. We could not 
possibly have inllieted the slightest injury upon her. and should have exposed 
ourselves to almost instant destruction — a one-sided combat, which I do not 
consider m\ self called upon to engage in." 

G IDE ON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Navy Department, October 20, 1865. 

Upon which charge and specification the finding of the Court was as follows: 
"Specification of the charge proven, except in so far as the words -as it was his 

duty to have done' declare it to have been the imperative duty of the accused to join 

battle with the Stonewall on the 24th day of March. 

"The Court, in considering the specification as only proven in part, and the accused 

guilty in a less degree than charged, does not wish to deprive an officer of the discre- 



40 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

tionary power due to his command, nor to establish the principle that it is always,, 
and under all circumstances, imperative that two wooden vessels should attack an 
iron-clad; but the Court intends to express its censure upon Commodore Craven's 
defective judgment on the 24th day of March, 1865, arising from his want of zeal and 
exertion in not making constant and personal observation of the rebel ram while at 
Ferrol, and thereby endeavoring to ascertain the truth or falsehood of the received 
reports of her character. The Court intends, also, to reflect upon the conduct of the 
accused in remaining quietly at anchor in the bay of Coruna, while his enemy was 
parading about in neutral waters, flaunting his flags, &c, when, in the judgment of 
this Court, it was his duty to have gone out with his two vessels in the same neutral 
waters, and there to have made observations of her qualities as to speed, rapidity of 
turning, &c, as well as to have made close inspection of all her vulnerable points. 
He would then, also, have been ready to avail himself of any opportunity that might 
have offered, had his enemy been disposed to have given him battle in the open sea. 
At all events, he could have kept her in sight and been satisfied of her whereabouts. 
Neither does the Court find it in evidence that he had formed with his consort any 
plan of attack should an action have occurred. 

"And, therefore, the Court doth adjudge him guilty in a degree of the charge pre- 
ferred, and doth find him guilty of the charge in a less degree than charged. 
"And the Court doth award the following sentence, viz: 

"That the accused, Commodore Thomas T. Craven, be suspended from duty on leave- 
pay for two years. 

Vice-Admiral D. G. Farragut, ■ 

President . 

H. Paulding, Bear-Admiral. 

C. H. Davis, Bear-Admiral. 

J. A. Dahlgrex, Bear-Admiral. 

T. Turner, Commodore. 

Jas. S. Palmer, Commodore. 

Jno. A. Winslow, Commodore. 

S. P. Lee, Captain. 

Melancton Smith, Captain." 

This record was transmitted to the Secretary of the Navy, and by him returned to 
the Court with the following letter: 

"Navy Department, Washington, December 1, 1865. 

"Sir: The record of the proceedings of the Court of which you are president, in 
the case of Commodore Thomas T. Craven, is herewith returned for a revision of the 
finding, which, in the opinion of the Department, is in conflict with law, and, if 
approved, Avould tend to render the provisions of law which the accused is charged 
with violating a 'dead letter.' 

"It is well settled that a court-martial may find a prisoner guilty in a less degree 
than charged, but this is only in cases where there is a kindred nature between the 
offense charged and the offense found proved; as, for instance, between murder and 
manslaughter, or between desertion and absence without leave. 

"In the opinion of the Department the statutory offense with which Commodore 
Craven is charged embraces, and was designed to embrace, all offenses of a kindred 
nature, in such manner that if the accused is found to have been guilty of any one 
of these kindred oifenses on the occasion which was believed to render him charge- 
able with the capital offense, then he is necessarily guilty of the capital offense; for 
instance, if his failure to do his utmost arose from negligence, then he is guilty, not 
simply of negligence, but of the capital offense. So, if his failure arose from drunk- 
enness, cowardice, culpable inefficiency, disobedience of orders, disaffection, &c. 
Any other recognized construction- of the law would leave it in the power of courts- 
martial to consider the statutory offense as abolished and repealed, or to exist only 
at their discretion. 

"And this construction would also leave it discretionary with courts to depart from 
the law in another respect, by assuming, in fact, the power to mitigate punishments. 
"I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, 

"GIDEON WELLES, 

" Secretary of the Navy. 
" Vice- Admiral D. G. Farragut, U. S. A 7 ., 

" President Naval General Court-Martial, Washington, D. C. 

"Whereupon the Court proceeded to revise its action upon the charge and specifi- 
cation, and, after more mature deliberation, doth find the specification of the charge 
proven, except the words ' as it was his duty to have done,' and doth find the accused, 
Commodore Thomas T. Craven, of the charge guilty. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 41 

"And doth award the following punishment, viz: 

"That the accused, Commodore Thomas T. Craven, be suspended from duty for two 
years on leave-pay. 

Vice- Admiral D. G. Farraglt. 

President. 

H. Paulding, Bear-Admiral. 

C. H. Davis, Bear-Admiral. 

J. A. Dahlgrex, Bear-Admiral. 

T. Turner, Commodore. 

Jas. S. Palmer, Commodore. 

Jxo. A. Winslow, Commodore. 

s. P. Lee, Captain. 

Melaxctox Smith. Captain." 

The importance of this trial, the degree of public attention which it has attracted, 
the high standing of the members of the Court, and the extraordinary result of their 
deliberations, constrain the Department to express its views of the case more at 
length khan is ordinarily necessary. 

The offense for which" Commodore Craven was tried is one which the law. with a 
view no doubt to the protection of the public interests and national character in time 
of war, has included among those to which the penalty of death is attached. 

The same law has enjoined it upon courts-martial, "in all cases of conviction, to 
adjudge a punishment adequate to the character and nature of the offense committed." 
It leaves it discretionary with a court-martial to recommend the person convicted to 
clemency ; this clemency, however, to be exercised not by the Court, but by the revis- 
ing power or the President of the United States, who are expressly clothed with the 
power to mitigate or remit punishment. 

In all these, provisions the law is clear, precise, and free from ambiguity. 

It can hardly require argument to make it plain that a punishment which would 
be deemed too mild for a trivial offense or misdemeanor — a '•nominal punishment* — 
cannot he adequate punishment for an offense to which the law has attached the pen- 
alty of death. 

Yet the Court, in this case of conviction of a capital offense, has adjudged a pun- 
ishment which is obviously nothing more than a nominal punishment, if it be even 
as much. Suspension from duty for two years on "leave pay" is. in itself, nothing 
more than leave of absence for the same period; and nothing is added to it to give it 
a semblance of real punishment; not even as much ;is a reprimand, severe or other- 
wise, public or private. Such punishment as this no officer could obtain from the 
Department as a favor. 

The Department is therefore forced to conclude that in awarding this pretended 
punishment, the court-martial which tried Commodore Craven has disregarded the 
law. 

It may be t hat the Court, or members of it. deemed the law under which the accused 
was arraigned one of a harsh character; but even admitting that it be so, it is still 
law, and they were bound by a solemn obligation to administer it as it stands, and 
not to modi f j it so that it might accord with their own notions of justice. They had 
no more authority to do so than to repeal the law. 

The final proceedings of the Court are inexplicable to the Department. If. after 
finding the accused guilty of a capital offense, they had Btated mitigating circum- 
stances as a justification for awarding a light punishment, the Department, while 
considering their course as erroneous and in violation of law. mighl still have per- 
ceived some indication of sufficient motive and consistent action. Hut instead of 
pointing to mitigating circumstances, they have prepared and left on record a state- 
ment of aggravating circumstances. 

In this statement they censure the accused for "his want of zeal and exertion in 
not making constant and personal observation of the rebel ram while at Ferrol, and 
thereby endeavoring to ascertain the truth or falsehood of the received reports of 
her character. " 

They reflect also upon "the conduct of the accused iu remaining quietly at anchor 
in the hay of Corufia while his enemy was parading about in neutral waters, flaunt- 
ing his flag," &c. 

And they say : " Neither does the Court find it in evidence that he had formed with 
his consort any plan of attack should an action have occurred." 

Any one of the derelictions of duty here specified would deserve some greater pun- 
ishment than leave of absence for two years. 

If it was the duty of the accused to encounter the Stonewall, and, through negli- 
gence, or any other fault, he failed in any one particular to do his duty, then he did 
not do his utmost to capture or destroy the vessel, and is guilty of the charge pre- 
ferred against him. The Court have found him guilty of it ; and, from the facts which 
they find proved, it appears that the accused, instead of failing merely in a single 



42 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

particular, failed in many respects— instead of doing his utmost, in fact did nothing — 
and was wholly and inexcusably derelict. He was therefore not only guilty of the 
charge, but guilty in the broadest sense, and such guilt called for adequate punish- 
ment. 

Such is the necessary inference from what the Court find proved. But this infer- 
ence is destroyed, and the finding of guilty contradicted by what the Court find riot 
proved. 

They say they find the specification of the charge proven except the words "as it 
was his duty to have done." 

This exception destroys and annihilates the gravamen of the charge. The charge 
against the accused was, as required by law, specific. It was founded solely upon 
the assumption that it was the duty of the accused to encounter the Stonewall at the 
time and place specified. If, as the Court state, it is not proved that it was his duty 
to encounter that vessel, then he is not proved guilty of the charge preferred against 
him, and the Court have committed a grave error in finding him guilty of it. 

It is therefore impossible for the Department to gather from the action of the Court 
whether the accused is guilty or not. Their finding on the charge declares him guilty, 
but their finding on the specification, and the nominal punishment awarded, imply 
that they considered him not guilty. The incongruous whole has the aspect of an 
unsuccessful attempt at compromise between those members of the Court who believed 
the accused guilty and others who believed him not guilty. 

The whole action of the Court unfortunately suggests to officers of the Navy an 
inference which the Department, in behalf of the Court, must strenuously disclaim 
for them as not intended, or, at least, as not maturely considered. That inference is 
that the general rule with a commanding officer of the Navy should be: "Do not 
fight if there is a chance of defeat,' 7 rather than the converse rule: " Fight if there is 
a chance of victory." 

The principle uniformly inculcated as a rule of naval action has been, that it is the 
first duty of a commander in war to take great risks for the accomplishment of great 
ends. 

The proceedings of the Court are set aside, and Commodore Thomas T. Craven is 
hereby relieved from arrest. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Ordek, No. 69. 

December 12, 1865. 

Acting Volunteer Lieutenant R. S. Wetmore was tried by General Court-Martial at 
the navy yard at Philadelphia, December 4, 1865, upon the charge of violating U. S. 
Navy Regulations; in that he did, while executive officer of the Waxsaw, then lying 
at Baltimore, and in the absence of his commanding officer, leave the vessel and re- 
main away over night, knowing that but one line officer would remain in charge of 
the vessel. 

The Court find the accused " Guilty ;" but that he did as he did in obedience to the 
orders of his commanding officer; and do sentence him "to be reprimanded in Gen- 
eral Orders by the Secretary of the Navy for permitting the vessel to be left with 
only one line officer on board." 

Lieutenant Commander James Stilwell was tried by a Naval Court-Martial at the 
navy yard, Philadelphia, upon the charge of "neglect of duty;" in that while in 
command of the U.S. S. Waxsaw, at Baltimore, in November, 1865, he remained 
out of his vessel over night, and gave permission to his executive officer to be absent 
from the vessel at the same time, thus leaving but one line officer on board, in con- 
sequence of which neglect eight men deserted from the vessel. 

Of the charge the Court find him " Guilty," and he was sentenced "to be dismissed 
from the Navy of the United States." 

The action of the Court in this case is approved, but owing to the good conduct of 
the accused in the engagement on the Mississippi at the passage of the forts below 
New Orleans, as reported by his superior officer, the sentence is so mitigated that 
the accused, Lieutenant Commander James Stillwell, is suspended from rank and duty 
for three (3) years, to be computed from November 30, 1865, the date of his sentence. 

That a regular officer of the rank and experience which Lieutenant Commander Still- 
well has should so inexcusably violate the Regulations of the Navy, and a custom so old 
that it had become in fact law before the Regulations were issued, and manifest so 
little regard for the security of his men and the discipline of his ship as to suffer the 
escape of eight men in one night, and this, too, the night after the escape of two men 
belonging to his vessel, indicates a degree of neglect of duty and careless indifference 
deserving the severest censure. The evidence discloses the fact that the permission 
to be absent, given to Acting Volunteer Lieutenant IVelmore, the executive officer, 
was granted (without having been asked) while they were together in the evening 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. .43 

at the Eutaw House, at Baltimore, and with the knowledge on the part of Lieutenant 
Commander Stillwell that there could he hut two line officers left upon the vessel; 
while the executive officer, at the time of accepting sruch permission, was aware that 
only one officer would he in charge of the vessel, having himself given permission to 
one officer to he absent. That Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Wetmore should have 
accepted such permission Avith the knowledge he possessed, and without intimating 
the true state of the case to his commanding officer, is a culpable omission of a plain 
moral duty which must prevent tMat confidence in him which ought always to be 
placed implicitlv in a naval officer. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 70. 

December 20, 1865. 
Superseded by paragraphs 17 and 19, page 359, Navy Regulation Circular, No. 2. 



Circular Letter. 

Jan it aril 10, 1866. 
The act of Congress of the 5th of July, 1XH2. re-organizing the Navy Department, 
provides that all the duties of the Bureaus "shall be performed under the authority 
of the Secretary of the Navy, and their orders shall be considered as emanating from 
him. As the communications of a chief of a Bureau intended or likely to influence 
the action of Congress or the Executive are supposed to reflect the sentiments of the 
Department, it is considered improper to make such communications, or to take any 
steps calculated to influence congressional or executive action without consultation 
with the head of the Department. 

Very respectfully, GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Kavy. 

To Chiefs of Bureaus. 



General Order, No. 71. 

January l">. i860. 

.Medals of honor are awarded to the following named persons W ho have distinguished 

themselves in the naval service by gallantry in action and <>i her Beamanlike qualities: 
William H. Stacy, seaman. U.S. 8. Rhode Island. While coaling ship in the harbor 
of Cape Haytien one of the crew of the Rhode Island fell overboard, and. notwith- 
standing he succeeded in catching a rope, had, from exhaustion, to relinquish his 
hold. Although the sea \min running high at the time, Stacy, at the peril of his lite, 

jumped overboard, secured the rope around his comrade, ami thus saved him from 
drowning. 

Henry Shutee, captain of the forecastle, U. S. S. Wissahiccon. For distinguished 
service in the battles below New Orleans. April _l and 25, L862, and in the engage- 
ment at Fort McAllister, February 27, i s ''>:'>. and seamanlike qualities while gunner's 
mate of the U. s. s. Don. A shot from Port McAllister penetrated the Wissahiccon 
below the water line and entered the magazine, <>n which occasion Shutes, by his pres- 
ence of mind and prompt action, contributed to the preservation of the powder and 
the safety of the ship. 

John Taylor, seaman, in charge of the picket boal attached to the New York navy 
yard. For coolness, promptness, and good judgment on the 9th of September, l^o'i. 
in rescuing from drowning Commander S. D. Trenchard, of the U. S. Navy, who fell 
overboard in attempting to get on a ferry boal which had collided with an Fnglish 
Steamer, and needed immediate assistance. 

John Harris, captain of the forecastle: 

Henri/ Baker, quarter gunner: 

James Avery, seaman : 

John Ponntllii. ordinal y seaman: and 

Joint Noble, landsman. 
all of the United States steamer Metacomet. These men constituted the boat's clew 
which, in charge of Acting Ensign If. C.Nields, of the V. s. Navy, went to the rescue 
of the officers and crew of rise ( T . s. Monitor Tecumseh when that vessel was sunk by 
a torpedo in passing the forts in Mobile Hay. August 5, L864. 1 bis boat's crew, under 
their brave leader, went within a few hundred yards of one of the forts, under a fire 
which Admiral Farragut expressed as "one of the most galling" he ever saw, and 
succeeded in rescuing from death ten of the crew of the Tecumseh. Their conduct 
elicited the admiration of both friend and foe. 

The medals of honor are in the hands of the engraver, and when received by the 
Department shall he forwarded to those to whom the> have been awarded, on appli- 



44 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

cation through their commanding officers if in the service; or if they have been dis- 
charged, on their furnishing the Department with satisfactory evidence of their 
identity. 

GIDEON WELLES. 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 72. 

January 19, 1866. 
At a Naval General Court-Martial assembled at the navy yard, Philadelphia, Cap- 
tain Cicero Price, of the U. S. Navy, was recently tried on the following charge and 
specification, viz: 
Charge. — " Neglect of duty." 

Specification — ''In this: that the said Captain Cicero Price, of the IT. S. Navy, having 
taken command of the U. S. S. Jamestown, on the twenty : fifth day of September, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-two, said vessel being then in commission and lying 
off the navy yard at Philadelphia, fitting out for a foreign cruise, and on the 
completion of said fitting out, said Captain Cicero Price, U. S. N., having sailed 
on the twelfth day of October, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, with the said 
vessel under his command, from the navy yard at Philadelphia, under orders 
from the Navy Department to proceed to the East Indies and the coast of China, 
did fail, before sailing on the said twelfth day of October, eighteen hundred 
and sixty-two, to transmit to the Secretary of the Navy complete lists or muster 
rolls of the officers and rated men under his command on board said vessel; and 
that, during the cruise of said vessel, while under his command, from the twenty- 
fifth day of September, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, to the time he was de- 
tached from said vessel — the seventeenth day of October, eighteen hundred and 
sixty-five — he'was habitually neglectful of his duty in transmitting to the De- 
partment the muster rolls of the said vessel, as the law requires of each com- 
manding officer, and which it was his duty to have done." 
Of this charge the accused was found guilty, and sentenced as follows, viz: 
"To be suspended from rank and command for the period of two (2) years, and to 
forfeit one-half of his leave of absence or waiting-order's pay for the period of his 
suspension/' 

If the Department had any hesitation in approving this sentence, it would not be 
caused by the severity of the punishment awarded. Neglect to comply with the reg- 
ulations respecting muster rolls and other returns has become so common as not only 
to embarrass the Department, but cause serious injury and losses to the men. An 
instance occurred in this war where a naval vessel went to sea and was lost, with all 
her papers; and no muster roll having been forwarded to the Department, great de- 
lay and suffering has ensued amongst the heirs of those on board. 

The Department regrets the necessity of bringing to trial and punishment an officer 
of the age and experience of Captain Price ; but commanding officers must understand 
that the laws and regulations for the protection of enlisted persons cannot be evaded. 
Captain Cicero Price will be considered as suspended, in conformity with his sen- 
tence, from this date. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. NAVY REGULATION CIRCULAR No. 2. 

The following alterations and additions are hereby made to the Regulations pub- 
lished for the government of all persons attached to the United States naval service,, 
under date of April 18, 1865, and will be obeyed accordingly : 

Every person subject to the control of the Navy Department will preserve this cir- 
cular in his book of regulations. 

1. Paragraph 52, page 8, in the second line after the word "follows," insert: 
"The boatswain will attend the side with eight side boys: the side shall be piped." 

2. Paragraph 61, page 9, at the end add: "A vice-consul, consular agent, or com- 
mercial agent, shall be saluted with five guns." 

3. The following paragraphs, designated as a, b, c, and d, will immediately precede 
paragraph 62, page 10: 

a. When a Vice-Admiral shall go on board of his flag-ship to assume command, the 
side shall be attended by the boatswain, with eight side boys. He shall be received 
by all the officers of the vessel in full-dress uniform, and the crew, in clean muster- 
ing clothes, arranged on the side opposite to that on which he enters.- The marine 
guard shall be paraded. He shall be received at the gangway by the commanding 
officer and such other officers of the vessel as may be designated by the commander. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 45 

The officers and men shall uncover their heads: the guard shall present arms; the 
drums shall give three ruffles, and the music on board shall then play a march. 
When the Vice- Admiral orders his flag to be hoisted, a salute of fifteen guns shall 
be fired — the flag to be unfurled at the firing of the first gun. 

I. When a Vice-Admiral shall make a visit of ceremony or inspection to any vessel 
of the fleet under his command, the same honors shall be paid to him, and the same 
ceremonies observed, as in the case of his assuming command, with the exception 
that, if saluted, the salute shall be fired immediately after he comes on board. 

c. When a Vice-Admiral relinquishes his command afloat, the ceremonies pre- 
scribed for his first reception shall be observed: and after he shall have disembarked 
the salute shall be fired, and his flag lowered down at the filing of the last gun of 
the salute. 

d. When a Vice-Admiral leaves his flag-ship with the intention of soon returning 
on board, the side shall be attended by the boatswain, with eight side buys. He 
shall be entitled to a full guard, which is to present arms as he passes in front of it, 
and the drums will give three rutHes. He is to be attended to the gangway by the 
line officer on board next in rank to himself, and by all the line officers of his staff 
other than those who are to accompany' him. The officer of the deck and junior offi- 
cers of the watch will also be in attendance. The same ceremonies are to be ob- 
served on his return to the ship. If absent at night and with the intention of re- 
turning, four white-light lantern lights are to be hoisted perpendicularly at the 
peak. The top lights of all flag-ships are to be lighted at night while in port. 

4. Paragraph 62, page 10, in the second line after the word command, insert: "The 
side shall be attended by the boatswain and six side hoys." 

5. Paragraph 66, page 10. amended so as ro apply to a Vice-Admiral's flag also. 

6. Paragraph 73, page 12, is rescinded, and the following substituted: "The side 
may be piped and attended by side boys for all commissioned officers visiting and 
leaving vessels of the Na\ \ . When commanding officers visit or depart from vessels 
of the Navy, they shall he received at the gangway on arriving, and attended to the 
gangway on departing, by the commander of the vessel, if the visiting commanding 
officer is of the same or higher rank: otherwise, by the executive officer. The officer 
of the deck for the time being will receive at the gangway on the arrival, and attend 
at the gangway at the departure, of all commissioned officers. Warrant officers will 
receive and see over the side of the ship all warrant officers visiting or departing 
from the same." 

7. Paragraph 74, page 12, in next to the last line, read 'one light for two lights." 

8. Paragraph 75, page 12, insert in the first line after a and before Rear, the words 
"■ Vivo, or." 

9. Paragraph 81. page 13, is rescinded. 

10. Paragraph 82, page 13. in the fust and second lines, insert the words. '• Vice 
or," before the word Hear, in each case. 

II. Paragraph 83, page 13. is modified as follows: "As accidents may occur during 
the firing of salutes in vessels, from the haste with which the gUtB are necessarily 
reloaded, no vessel of the Navy mounting less than ten guns is in future to tire a 
salute that may require the reloading of the guns. It accessary, in order to avoid 
giving offense to official persons abroad, she may, however, tire a return salute: but 
under no circumstances shall a transport, store-ship, or surveying \ esse] fire a salute. 

12. Paragraphs!, page 13, is altered to read ten guns instead of six guns. 

13. Paragraph 94, page 14, omit the words "or less." in the first line. 

14. Paragraph 106, page 17. at the end add. "unless such honors have been tend- 
ered and declined." 

15. Paragraphs 1(56 and 1(57, page 29, are hereby rescinded. 

16. Officers not on duty, or on leave of absence, are to keep the Department at 
all times advised of their particular address in the State or Territory in which they 
reside. 

17. The residence of an officer is within the State or Territory which he habitually 
makes his home when off duty, and the appropriate column in the Navy Kegister 
will designate whatever State or Territory officers may select as their residence. No 
officer making suqh selection will afterwards change it or his residence without the 
authority of the Secretary of the Navy. 

18. No officer under arrest or suspension, or on furlough, will leave the State or 
Territory of which he is a resident, or visit the Navy Department, without the 
authority of the Secretary of the Navy. 

19. No officer whose residence is without the District of Columbia will come within 
the limits of the same without the permission of the Secretary of the Navy. Every 
officer applying for permission to visit the District of Columbia will state the object 
which induces his application, and the period and length of his intended visit. 

20. Paragraph 178, page 31. The following is substituted for the last clause of 
said paragraph: "In case of officers who are required to furnish testimonials on pre- 
senting themselves for examination, such testimonials may be written by those 



4.6 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

whose province it is to do so; but they shall be directed to and sent to the Navy De- 
partment, and certified copies of them given to the individuals to whom the testi- 
monials are due." 

21. Paragraph 179, page 31, add the words "excepting such as are authorized in 
the preceding amended paragraph." 

22. Paragraph 448, page 78, is amended so as to read after the word " Navigator 7 ' 
(in the second line), "and ordnance officer;" and he will, in addition to his duties as 
navigator of the vessel, have charge of, and be responsible for, the expenditure, 
care, preservation, and safekeeping of all ordnance equipments and stores, and of 
all receipt and account books and returns, under the orders and instructions of the 
commander of the vessel, and in conformity to the prescribed regulations and in- 
structions in the Ordnance Manual. All returns, receipts and expenditure of ord- 
nance equipments and stores, will be made by the "navigator and ordnance officer," 
in conformity to the regulations and instructions in the Ordnance Manual. 

23. Paragraph 459, page 82, add to the paragraph the following: "He will keep 
and transmit to the Bureau of Navigation an abstract of the meteorological observa- 
tions recorded in the log-book, according to the prescribed form." 

24. Paragraph 460, page 82, is rescinded, and the following is substituted: "The 
navigator shall prepare, and, after it shall have been approved by his commanding 
officer, transmit to the Bureau of Navigation, from time to time, if practicable, other- 
wise, at the end of the cruise, a skeleton chart of the cruising ground, showing dis- 
tinctly the track or tracks of the vessel, with the day, month, and year, noted during 
the entire cruise or period of time the vessel was absent from port or the United 
States; to which must be appended remarks and notes bearing upon the winds, 
weather, currents of the ocean, and other phenomena of value to nautical science." 

25. So much of paragraphs 478 to 491, inclusive (pages 84 to 86), which relate to 
the duties of gunner, and are in conflict with the amended paragraph 448, are re- 
scinded in respect to that officer; but are hereby made applicable to, and remain in 
full force and effect in regard to, the duties of the "navigation and ordnance officer" 
of the vessel. When a gunner is attached to a vessel having a "navigator and ord- 
nance officer" on board, the duties of the gunner, in connection with the battery, 
magazines, and ordnance equipments in charge of the "navigator and ordnance 
officer," will be prescribed by the commander of the vessel, but not in conflict with 
the amended paragraph 448. 

26. Paragraph 563, page 99, is so far modified as to dispense with sending to the 
Department copies of all bills or accounts. 

27. Paragraph 665, page 116, add the words : "When the cases are simple, and there 
is but one medical officer attached to the vessel, the surgeon's steward may be di- 
rected to accompany them." 

28. Paragraph 1084, page 193, is rescinded, and the following is substituted: 
"Commandants of navy yards, stations, or senior officers in charge of duty of any 
kind, by order of the Department, in the United States, shall not go beyond the 
limits of their respective commands, stations, or specified duty, for a longer period 
of time than 48 hours, without the permission of the Secretary of the Navy, except 
in cases of pressing emergency Avhich will not admit of sufficient delay to communi- 
cate with and receive a reply from the Department. In cases of such pressing neces- 
sity as hereinbefore mentioned, it shall be the duty of the before-mentioned officers 
to report to the Department, without unnecessary delay, a detailed statement of the 
facts and circumstances which induced them to leave their station. 

29. Paragraph 1146, page 205, is rescinded, and the following is substituted: "In 
all cases where transportation is furnished at the public expense to an officer of the 
Navy traveling under orders, the charge, cost, or value of such transportation shall 
be deducted from his mileage." 

30. Paragraph 1162, page 208, is so far modified as to read: "The pay of all pro- 
moted officers (modified by the laws in relation to the pay of officers subject to ex- 
amination before promotion) commences, ' &c, as prescribed in said paragraph 1162, 

31. No. 16 of U. S. Navy Regulation, Circular No. 1, is rescinded, and paragraph 
1163, page 209, " Regulations for the Navy," is amended to read as follows: "When 
ordered on sea-service, officers are entitled only to 'shore' or 'other-duty' pay from 
the day they leave their domicils, in obedience thereof, to the date they report for 
such service at the place where the vessel to which they are ordered is lying, if the 
vessel is in commission for sea-service; but if the vessel to which they are ordered 
is not in commission for sea-service at the time of their reporting, then until the 
vessel is regularly commissioned for sea-service. Sea-service and sea pay and rations 
of officers will only commence from the date o'f reporting for and joining a vessel in 
commission for sea-service. The duty pay of an engineer officer is the same, whether 
employed on shore duty or at sea, and it commences from the date of his leaving his 
domicile in obedience to orders for duty, though only entitled to credit for sea-service 
and allowance of rations from the date of joining' a vessel in commission for sea- 
service." 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 47 

32. Paragraph 1164. page 209, add after the word "accordingly" at the end of the 
paragraph: "But it is not to he understood that this allowance of 'other-duty pay' 
is to apply to officers returning to the United States under the sentence of a court- 
martial." 

33. Paragraph 1165, page 209. add: "When an officer on other duty than 'sea- 
service' enters a naval hospital for treatment, he shall continue to receive duty pay 7 
unless detached, hut not for a longer period of time than two months." 

34. Commanders of squadrons, stations, and vessels acting singly, will endorse 
upon the orders of all officers reporting for duty the dates thereof. 

35. Commanders of vessels will report the dates on which the vessels under their 
commands are regularly put into commission, to the Bureau of Navigation, and 
transmit, at the same time, correct lists of all the officers then and there present on 
hoard for duty. 

36. Officers ordered to duty on hoard a vessel already in commission for sea-service 
will, immediately after reporting for duty and joining that vessel, report the facts 
and date to the Bureau of Navigation. 

37. All communications to the Department, or which require the action or consid- 
eration of the Department, from officers not on duty or not under orders, will he 
transmitted by them directly, and not through persons holding any civil office or 
other position under the Government, with a view to the influence of such persons; 
and officers are admonished that such attempts to avail themselves of influence will 
he regarded as an evidence of the weakness of their claims. 

38. Commandants of navy yards and stations will promptly report to the Depart- 
ment the departure of vessels from, or their arrival within, the limits of their com- 
mand, stating the destination of the vessel or the quarter from which it came, as 
the case may be, and the commanding office! thereof. 

39. Commandants of navy yards ami stations, commanders of squadrons, and com- 
manders of \ essels, will communicate to the appropriate Bureau every three months, 
and oftener should the importance of the matter demand it, any faults in the Book 
of Allowances, as ascertained from its actual Qse, and any suggestions that, in their 
opinion, would tend to its perfection. 

40. Commandants of navy yards and of naval stations at which vessels may ho 
laid up in ordinary will make reports at the end of every month, to the Bureaus of 
Construction and of Steam Engineering, on the condition of the hulls and machinery, 
as follows: 

To the Bureau of Construction — the condition of the hull of each vessel, and the 
probable time required to make it lit for service. 

To the Bureau of steam Engineering — the condition, separately, of tin- engines, 
boiler^, screw-propellers or paddle-wheels, and appurtenances not included under 
those heads, of each vessel, and the probable time required to make them tit for service. 

The commandants will make such Suggestions, in these reports, ;is they deem will 
conduce to the hetter or more economical preservation of the hulls and machinery. 

41. No vessel will be reported by the commandant of a yard or Btation as ready tor 
officers until she is in a condition to receive them on board to m< 

42. A supply of all General Orders and Circulars of the Department will he for- 
warded to the commandants of stations and commanders of squadrons, who are re- 
quired to distribute them to each and ei ery officer under their respective com mauds. 

13. Commandants of stations will post, for at leasl three months after their date, 
in the most conspicuous place within the limits of their command, a copy of each oi 
the General Orders and Circulars received bj them. 

44. All officers on duty are required to apply, in writing, monthly, to the command- 
ant of the station or the squadron under whose command they are serving, for Midi 

General Orders and Circulars as they have not received; and all officers not on duty 
will make similar application to the Navy Department, such application to specify 

the numbers or dates of the General Orders or Circulars they have not received, or 
the number and date of the last one received by them. 

If). Vessels under steam will never use more than two-thirds of their hoiler power 
unless in an emergency, which must he fully entered and explained upon the Log, 
and a special report of the same made to the Bureau of .Steam Engineering. 

46. In reporting to the Department deaths, desertions, and personal casualties of 
whatever description, the name and rank or rating of the person will invariably he 
given. 

17. Puhlic property in the custody of officers of the Navy will not he loaned for 
private use, except under special authority from the Navy Department. 

48. Whenever a court-martial shall impose a sentence including forfeiture of pay 
upon any person in the naval service, it shall be the duty of the Court, in the case of 
commissioned officers, to state the rate of pay and time of such forfeiture, and in all 
other cases to fix the amount of pay so forfeited, stating it in dollars and cents. 

49. Such of the forms indicated in the Book of Regulations as shall not he furnished 
in hlank by the Department or its Bureaus, are to he prepared in manuscript by or 
under the directiou of those who are required to use them. 



48 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

50. Neither open purchases of bunting nor the flags prescribed in the Book of Allow- 
ances will be made except upon requisitions which have been submitted to the Bureau 
of Navigation and received its approval. 

51. When requisitions for open purchases are returned, approved by the proper Bu- 
reau, the purchasing paymaster will procure only those items the estimated cost of 
which is under one hundred dollars, reserving the remainder until the 25th of the 
month, on which day, monthly, he will advertise in at least two commercial news- 
papers for three successive days for proposals for furnishing such supplies, and will 
forward a printed copy or slip of the advertisement to each Bureau having articles 
contained in it. On the 1st day of the succeeding month the bids will be opened and 
the lowest bidders notified to make immediate deliveries, unless the prices are so ex- 
orbitant as to make it advisable to reject the bids altogether: which will be done if 
it is apparent that they are much above the market price. 

52. The chiefs of Bureaus will carefully scrutinize requisitions for open purchases, 
and will decline to approve those that are considered unnecessary, or where the varia- 
tion from the contract article is so trivial that the latter will serve the purpose in- 
stead. 

53. No requisition for an open purchase will be approved until it has the endorse- 
ment of the naval storekeeper that the articles required are not in the public store 
and are not due upon an existing contract. 

54. No requisition will be made for articles under contracts which have expired, 
nor after the close of the fiscal year; and no deliveries upon any contract will be re- 
ceived unless requisition for the same shall have been made on the date of or prior 
to said expiration or termination and previous to the receipt of articles upon a new- 
contract. 

55. Requisitions for stores, furniture, and articles that are perishable, or can be 
readily purchased, will not be made for vessels that have been ordered to be repaired 
and placed in ordinary, but only for vessels that have been ordered to be fitted for 
immediate service at sea; nor will requisitions be made without first ascertaining 
that there are no suitable articles for the purposes for which they are needed on hand. 

56. Requisitions for purchasing at the cost of defaulting contractors, in accordance 
with paragraph 964, page 171, must be submitted to the proper Bureau and receive 
its approval before the purchase be made. 

57. There must not be any serviceable articles at a navy yard or station that are 
not on charge and subject to requisition. All such articles must be on the store- 
keeper's books at a fair and proper valuation. 

58. The assessing and taxing of the workmen or other employes in the navy yards 
for party or political purposes is forbidden. Attempts to exact money from such 
persons for such purposes is, in every point of view, reprehensible, and is to be wholly 
and absolutely prohibited. Any master workman, or other appointee of the Navy 
Department, employed in the navy yards, who shall levy, or participate in the levy- 
ing, of contributions on persons in Government service, for party purposes, will ren- 
der himself liable to removal. Committee men, or the representatives of political 
parties, will not be permitted to visit the yards to make collections for any political 
party whatever. 

59. The employment of extra hands preceding warmly-contested elections, with the 
view of advancing the interests of any political party, is expressly forbidden. No 
more persons shall be employed or retained in a navy yard than the public service 
actually requires. Party gatherings and party discussions are at all times to be 
avoided within the navy yards. 

60. Application to fill the position of master workman in any of the navy yards 
will hereafter be addressed to the chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, stating 
the name, age, and residence of the applicant, with testimonials as to his character, 
habits, professional skill and competency, and physical ability. 

61. Whenever a vacancy shall occur in the office of master workman, a board will 
be convened at the navy yard where such vacancy exists, under the direction of the 
Secretary of the Navy, and a selection will be made from the qualified candidates, 
who shall have passed a satisfactory examination, irrespective of locality — no district 
or State being entitled to preference for these positions. 

62. All nominations of persons to office in navy yards, which require the approval 
of the Department, must be accompanied by testimonials of character, habits, and 
competency, and a statement as to whether the nominee has served in the military 
or naval service during the war, and, if so, how long and in what capacity. 

63. In the employment of mechanics and others in navy yards, at naval stations, 
or elsewhere in the service of the Navy Department, preference is to be given to such 
as have been honorably discharged from the Navy and Marine Corps, aud especially 
to those who have been wounded or disabled, provided they are capable of perform- 
ing satisfactorily the duties required of them. 

64. The Bureaus of the Navy Department will not pass bills for work performed 
that are not properly approved by the commanding officer who has been authorized 
to incur the indebtedness for, and has had charge of, such work. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



49 



65. The commanders of coast survey vessels, or other vessels having officers and 
crews belonging to the Navy, will transmit to the Department muster-rolls and make 
the other returns required by the Regulations, so far as applicable. 

66. The following form will be used in making return of persons honorably dis- 
charged, required by paragraph 779, page 136, Navy Regulations: 

List and Description of Men Honorably Discharged from the U. S. , 18 — . 



6 

P. 

a 


Names. 


eg 


Enlisted. 


-2 ffl 
A u 

s« * 

!i > W 


Where 
born. 


© 
< 


to 

o 




. Height. 


Permanent 
Marks, &c. 


Date of 

Dis- 
charge. 


A 


d 

A 


o ■» 

>. § 

.- 


02 


S t 

o a 
O fa 


- 
2 
t— I 

































Approved: 



Paymaster. 



Commanding Officer. 

67. The following is substituted for Form No. 3, on pages 250 and 251: 

Form No. 3. 

Complete Descriptive Muster Boll of the Crew of the U. S. on the day of , 18 — . 

[To be transmitted to the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting at the commencement of a cruise, and on the 
1st of January, April, July, October, and at the expiration of a cruise.] 



Names. 

(Alphabetically 

arranged, 

without regard 

to ratings, with 

the surnames to 

the left.) 



Date of en- 
listment. 



H £ > - - 



Where 
born. 



Recapitulation of Grew remaining on board 
at dale of Muster 1,'oli. 

Petty officers 

Seamen 

Ordinary seamen 

Landsmen 

Boys 

Apprentices 

Musicians 

Firemen 

Coal-heavers 



Total. 



Personal Description. 



Age. 






r- 

- x : 






T. 

D. 

R. 

D. D. 



It. 



In. 



liF.MARKS. 



Where and 
when. 



Approved this day of- 



-, 18—, at . 

Oommanding Officer. 



Certified to be correct, and thai all casualties, transfer?, 
deaths, desertions, and discharges that have occurred 

since the date of last Bluster Boll are duly Doted. 



Executive Officer. 



Received at the Navy Department 



Note. — Can; must be taken thai every column be correctly filled, and that all casualties, transfers, or dis- 
charges which have occurred during the quarter, or to date of roll, are duly noted, reporting dates of various 
changes, where transferred, &c. The names of the men thus reported to be entered in r iiuni with those re- 
maining on board. If the information required by the printed headings cannot be otherwise obtained, obtain 
it from the men themselves, making notes, showing the portions thus obtained, in the column for remarks. 
Commanding officers are requested to keep themselves supplied with blanks by application to the Bureau of 
Equipment and Recruiting, or Fleet paymaster. 

68. The following is substituted for Form No. 4, on page 252: 

Form No. 4. 
Description of Deserters and Mex Absent without Leave, from the U.S.S. , 18 — . 



Name. 


.2 


Enlisted. 


d 
o 

A 

i 

A 


©' 
bD 

< 


00 

© 

ft 


u 

W 


a 

o 

_© 

3, 
1 


Height. 


Permanent 
Marks, &c. 


d 

o 

so 


•d 

© 


Remarks. 


a 

9) 

A 

is 


6 

© 

A 


« 

fa 


00 

u 

c 

































Commanding 



50 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

69. The following is substituted for section 1236, page 225: "The officer by whose 
order a General Court-Martial, Summary Court-Martial, or Court of Inquiry, has been 
convened, is the only proper person to dissolve the Court. When, therefore, any 
Court shall have concluded the trial of all cases actually referred to it, and trans- 
mitted, severally, the records of its proceedings in each to the officer by whose order 
it was convened, it will await the further orders of that officer, whose duty it shall 
be, so soon as such records are received, to revise the same, and either to return them 
to the Court for its reconsideration or to dissolve the Court; and, after having dis- 
solved the Court, to forward such records to the Department as soon as practicable. 

70. Steam may be raised on board vessels of the Navy for the purpose of dispelling 
damp and unwholesome air or drying the ship, whenever, in the opinion of the com- 
manding officer, it is necessary. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Navy Department, 

January 30, 1866. 



General Order, No. 73. 

February 17, 1866. 
The following resolution of Congress, approved on the 10th instant, is published 
for the information of the officers and men of the Navy and the Marine Corps. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

A RESOLUTION tendering the thanks of Congress to Vice-Admiral David G. Farragut, and to the officers, 
petty officers, seamen, and marines under his command, for their gallantry and good conduct in the action 
in Mobile Bay on the fifth August, 1864. 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due and are hereby 
tendered to Vice-Admiral David G. Farragut, of the United States Navy, and to 
the officers, petty officers, seamen, and marines under his command, for the unsur- 
passed gallantry and skill exhibited by them in the engagement in Mobile Bay on 
the fifth day of August, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, and for their long and 
faithful services and unwavering devotion to the cause of the country in the midst 
of the greatest difficulties and dangers. 

Sec. 2. And be it further resolved, That the President of the United States be requested 
to communicate this resolution to Vice-Admiral Farragut, and that the Secretary of 
the,Navy be requested to communicate the same to the officers, seamen, and marines 
of the Navy by General Order of his Department. 

Approved February 10, 1866. 



General Order, No. 74 

April 1, 1866. 
At a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the navy yard, Philadelphia, March 
22, 1866, Paymaster Rufus C. Spalding, of the Navy, was tried on the following charge 
and specification, viz: 

Charge. — " Culpable inefficiency in the performance of duty." 

Specification — In this : that on or about the twenty-first day of December, eighteen 
hundred and sixty-five, owing to the culpable inefficiency of the said Rufus 
C. Spalding, paymaster, U. S. Navy, in the performance of his duty at the 
naval station, Mound City, Illinois, to which he was then attached, funds 
under his care, belonging to the Government, were stolen, to the amount of 
more than fourteen thousand dollars. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Navy Department, February 14, 1866. 

Upon which charge and specification the finding of the Court was as follows: 

"The specification of the charge is -proven; and the said Rufus C. Spalding, pay- 
master, U. S. Navy, is guilty of the charge." 

"And the Court doth sentence the said Rufus C. Spalding, paymaster, U. S. Navy, 
to be suspended for the term of one year, and to forfeit for the said term one-half of 
his leave of absence or waiting orders pay, and be reprimanded by the Secretary of 
the Navy." 

This sentence may, at first sight, appear to be mild for the offense proved; but, in 
addition to the penalty imposed by the Court, Paymaster Spalding stands debited 
with the full amount of Government funds referred to in the specification as lost 
through his negligence. In view of all the facts, the punishment may be considered 
adequate to the offense, and the sentence is therefore approved. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



51 



The evidence and argument of the accused before the Court rests upon the errone- 
ous supposition that, inasmuch as an assistant paymaster — himself a bonded officer — 
had been ordered to assist him in the performance of his duties, Paymaster Spalding 
might transfer to him some share of his responsibilities. 

Paymasters may not delegate any part of their responsibility to their subordinates. 
Government property, drawn upon the requisition of a paymaster, stands charged to 
him, and he is held to answer for any loss occurring through his negligence or that 
of his subordinates. 

It has come to the knowledge of the Department that other paymasters, like Pay- 
master Spalding, have been in the habit of entrusting the keys of their safes to their 
subordinates, with free access to the public funds contained therein. This ought 
never to be done except in cases of the extremist necessity, and then only to such an 
extent as such necessity may require. 

This practice subjects the subordinate to the possibility of unjust suspicion, it 
exposes him to temptation, and it is a culpable avoidance on the part of the pay- 
master of the care and labor necessarily incident to the faithful and proper perform- 
ance of his duties. 

Acting Assistant Paymaster J. S. Harvey was tried before the same Court April 2, 
1866, upon a similar charge and specification, found guilty, and sentenced "To be 
dismissed from the naval service of the United States." The evidence in this case 
showing a want of what may be considered ordinary care in securing the money and 
keys entrusted to him by Paymaster Spalding, and a culpable disregard both of the 
interests of the Government and of his superior officer, Paymaster Spalding, the sen- 
tence is approved. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

& ( retary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

April 23, 1866. 
The following permanent squadrons are established, having, respectively, the limits 
designated upon the squadron charts, viz: 

1. North Atlantic Squadron, embracing what was known as the Home or West 
Indian Squadron. 

2. European Squadron, embracing the Atlant Ic ooasl of Europe, t he Mediterranean, 
and part of the west coast of Africa. 

3. South Atlantic Squadron, embracing part of the west coast of Africa and the 
southeast coast of South America. 

4. South Pacific Squadron, embracing the wesl ooasl ofSbuth America and Australia. 

5. North Pacific Squadron, embracing the west coast of North America and the 
Sandwich Islands. 

6. Asiatic Squadron, embracing the west ooasl of Asia and adjacent Islands. 

So far as the public service will admit, and supplies can be procured, the vessels 
of each squadron will be required to visit , alternately, all t he places within the limits 
of the command, unless otherwise directed by the Secretary of the Navy, where 
American commerce extends, taking advantage of the great wind currents to econo- 
mize coal. Lengthy anchorages in port, where no public exigency has arisen to 
require it, or wintering the vessels in any port is forbidden. 

Quarterly reports, according to the following form, will be sent to the Secretary 
of the Navy: 



Rati-. 



Command. 



Poj i- visited, 
and the dates. 



Days &1 

sea. 



Port. 



Remarks. 



GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular No. 3. 

April 30, 1866. 

The following alterations and additions are hereby made to the Regulations pub- 
lished for the government of all persons attached to the United States naval service, 
under date of April 18, 1865, and will be obeyed accordingly : 

Every person subject to the control of the Navy Department will preserve a copy 
of this circular in his book of regulations. 



52 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

1. In foreign ports where a paymaster in charge of stores is stationed — whether on 
shore or on hoard a stationary storeship — all requisitions for stores will he made upon 
him, and all purchases in open market will he made by him, unless otherwise directed 
by the commander of the squadron for reasons to he stated to the Department. 

2. The descriptive lists attached to certificates of death, certificates of ordinary 
disability, and certificates of pension, are always to be signed by the paymaster in 
charge of the accounts of the person in whose case the certificate issues. 

3. Whenever a vessel-of-war visits a foreign port where there is a consular repre- 
sentative of the United States, the commanding officer of such vessel will consult 
with such representative with regard to procuring coal or other supplies of which 
the vessel may stand in need, and will give due consideration to his suggestions, and 
act upon them, if it shall appear to the interest of the naval service to do so. In 
receiving the suggestions of such consular representatives, and availing themselves 
of their local knowledge, commanding officers are not thereby in any degree relieved 
from the duty and responsibility of making diligent personal inquiry themselves, 
with the view of protecting and doing the best for the Government. 

4. Attempts to influence the legislative branch of the Government, or any member 
thereof, touching measures connected with naval affairs, are often productive of 
embarrassment, and are therefore disapproved, excepting when the opinion of an 
officer is requested, in writing, by a member or members. 

5. A committee of Congress officially visiting a navy yard or station will be saluted 
with fifteen guns. 

6. The following is substituted for paragraph 163, page 29: 

When any commissioned or warrant officer, seaman, marine, or other person belong- 
ing to the Navy, shall be accused of a capital crime, or of having used violence, or 
committed any offense against the person or property of any citizen of any of the 
United States, such as is punishable by the known laws of the land, the commanding 
officer and officers of every vessel, naval station, or command to which the person or 
persons so accused shall belong, are hereby required, upon applications duly made 
oy or in behalf of the party or parties injured, to use their utmost endeavors to deliver 
over such accused person or persons to the civil magistrate, and likewise to he aiding 
and assisting to the officers of justice in apprehending and securing the person or 
persons so accused, in order to bring him or them to trial. 

7. Article II, pages 2 and 3, is amended as follows: 

Line Officers. 

Midshipmen, who have finally graduated, shall rank next aftfir ensigns. 
Boatswains next after midshipmen who have finally graduated. 
Gunners next after boatswains. 

Midshipmen, who have not finally graduated, next after gunners. 
Mates next after midshipmen who have not finally graduated. 

Staff Officers. 

3d assistant engineers and clerks to have assimilated rank with midshipmen who 
have not finally graduated. 
Carpenters and sailmakers to have assimilated rank with mates. 

8. The second clause of paragraph 178, page 30, having been superseded by para- 
graph 20, page 359, Regulations Circular No. 2, the first or remaining clause is hereby 
rescinded. 

9. Reports in full of the character and qualifications of officers having been pro- 
vided for by forms 25, 26, and 27, pages 271, 2/2, and 273, and paragraph 44, page 354, 
Regulation Circular No. 1; all other testimonials or certificates to persons either in 
or out of the naval service are forbidden, excepting the following mentioned: 

Those that are authorized by paragraph 20, -page 359, Regulation Circular No. 2, 
which, however, must not be given if the official association or intercourse between 
the two has been for a less period than three months. 

Such cases of exceptional good conduct as may require special report. 

Those that are authorized by paragraph 969, page 172. 

To enlisted persons who are then, or who shall have been, in the Navy, who can 
receive the benefit of a letter of recommendation as to character and service from 
any officer acquainted with them. 

And appointed persons, who can receive commendatory letters or certificates from 
those by whom they were appointed or under whom they immediately served, coun- 
tersigned by the commanding officer ; but such letters or certificates are not to be 
given except at the termination of the appointment, nor unless the service of the 
persons shall have exceeded three months. 

10. Forms 26 and 27, pages 272 and 273, and paragraph 44, page 354, Regulation 
Circular No. 1, will hereafter apply to commandants of yards and stations, who will 
make quarterly returns in accordance therewith of officers attached to the yard or 
station. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 53 

11. Commanding officers of vessels will see that the steam heaters placed on hoard 
be not removed from their positions dining warm weather, as the practice of taking 
them down and storing them in the hold rapidly destroys them. 

12. Paragraph 364, page 65. is amended by adding to it the following words: this 
report will he forwarded to the Bureau of Construction and Repair. 

13. Page 237, report of " sailing qualities of ship," according to form No. 1, page 
246, to be sent to the Bureau of Construction and Repair, instead of the Navy De- 
partment. 

14. The attention of all persons in the naval service ia particularly called to the 
following law, any violation of which will be considered as an offense against the 
naval regulations, in addition to the penalty imposed by the law: 

AN ACT reducing the duty ;>n imports, and for uther purposes. 

Sec. 10. And be it further enacted, That no officer or other person connected with 
the Navy of the United States shall, under any pretense, import in any ship or ves- 
sel of the United States, any goods, wares, or merchandise liable to the payment of 
any duty. 

Approved July 30, 1846. 

15. In all eases of trial by courts-martial of any person in the naval service, where 
the accused has no legal adviser, he will be permitted to Belecl souk officer within 
reach to defend him; and in case he does not select any one, the authority convening 
the Court will detail an officer, who shall faithfully advise and assist the accused to 
the best of his ability. 

16. Officers who hare < hronic disorders not likely to be benefited by medical treat- 
ment will not be retained in a medical hospital over lour months; and no officer will 
be a second time received into a hospital on account of any disease or disability for 
which he has already had the advantage of medical treatment in a na e tablish- 
ment for the period above named. 

17. In case of robbery, or on the discovery of t he lo.ss of monej orol her public prop- 
erty, the, person responsible for the safe custody of the same will imra port 
the occurrence to the senior officer present, who will thereupon order a board of 
three suitable officers to investigate the alleged robbery or loss, and to report fully 
and impartially all the circumstances connected therewith, - tan ascer- 
tain, which report will he forwarded to the Secretary of th< '. a o >pj of it 
to the chief of the appropriate Bureau. 

IS. Paragraph 45, page 364, Regulation Circular No. 2 is ho far modified thai when 
paddle-wheel steamers are running long distances in tin trades, with the wind free, 
the paddies in the water are to be removed and th< sail alone. 

Under other circumstances, steam may in- used accordin laid paragraph. 

19. Paragraph 1199, page 216, Naval Regulations, and i 349, Reg- 
ulation Circular No. 1, give ample time to pay officers I iring their accounts 
in all ordinary cases. Therefore, when any pay officer shall fail bo rendei bis final 
accounts for settlemenl promptly within ; period, lie vill be considered 
as delinquent, and will be placed on furlough until further orders isual time 
necessary for packages to reach the Department ; > -\ ;• - point 
will be allowed, in addition bo the time given by i he above-mentioned regulations; 
but no increase of pay will be granted ;' ( »r this additional time. In extraordinary 
cases, the Department may suspend the operation of this rule upon application of 
the officer and satisfactory evidence thai the delay was unavoidable. 

20. The commanding officer of each vessel under repairs or fitting out at a navy 
yard or station will report to the 8 mmandant 
of the yard or station, on tin- 1st and I tie month, whai progress is being 
made in the preparation of the vessel for sea. what importanl work remains to be 
done, and when t he aame will probably be complete d ; >\ baf ohangi a of < onsequence 
have been made, and tie* reasons therefor: and will make any suggestions which he 
thinks would facilitate bhe preparation of the vessel for sea, if adopted. 

21. On the Isl of each month commandants of navy yards or shore stations will 
forward to the Secretary of tin Navj .: report of the vessels of the Navy repairing 
or fitting for sea at such yard or station, which report will embrace, in separate 
columns, the name of tin' \ esse), her rate, probable time of completion of hull, prob- 
able time of completion of machinery, when ready for officers to mess on board, 
when ready lor sea. name and rank of commanding officer, and .my remarks that 
may be deemed necessary. This report will be in lien one heretofore 
required, and will also embrace the nanus. &c, of the i connected 
with the yard or station. 

22. So far as the public service will permit, and supplies can be procured, com- 
manding officers of squadrons will requite their vessels to visit alternately all the 
places within the limits of their squadrons where American cenme ice extends, unless 
otherwise directed by the Secretary of the Navy. The vessels will take advantage 
of the great wind currents, and thus economize in the use of coal. 



54 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



23. Lengthy anchorage in ports where no public exigency requires the presence of 
a vessel is forbidden ; also the wintering of the vessels of a squadron in port. 

24. Commanders of squadrons and of vessels on special service abroad will cause 
the Secretary of the Navy to be furnished quarterly with a cruising report in the 
following form : 



Vessel. 


Kate. 


Commanding Officer. 


Ports visited, and date. 


Days 
at Sea. 


Days in 
Port. 


Remarks. 

















25. Masters-at-arms, yeomen, surgeons, and paymaster's stewards, appointed to a 
vessel ordered on distant service, will be allowed an advance of pay for the usual 
term, upon condition that the officers by whom they are respectively appointed con- 
sent to become responsible for such advance, which will be made by the paymaster 
of the vessel. 

26. Paragraph No. 975, page 173, is so modified, in the last line of the same, as to 
read "yearly pay." 

27. Persons deserting from the naval service forfeit all claim to any balances, in- 
cluding prize money, due to them at the time of desertion, unless sentenced to other 
punishment, or acquitted by a general court-martial, or unless the mark of desertion 
is erased by competent authority. 

28. Paragraph 422, page 74, is so far modified as to leave the keys of the medical 
store-rooms in charge of the surgeon of the vessel. 

29. Whenever a person is enlisted on board ship, or elsewhere than at a rendezvous, 
a complete descriptive list must be made and returned quarterly, with the shipping 
articles, signed by the recruiting officer and the surgeon. The form will be that 
found on page 256 of the Naval Regulations, substituting the name of vessel or place 
for "naval rendezvous," and quarter in place of the word "week." The recapitula- 
tion on page 257 is not required, but the certificate at the foot of this page is to be 
adopted, leaving out the second line of the second paragraph, viz: "also the names, 
&c, <fec, Avho have been rejected at the receiving ship." Printed blank forms will 
always be forwarded with the muster rolls and shipping articles. 

30. Attention is called to paragraph 49, page 364, Regulation Circular No. 2. The 
omission to forward the required returns and reports is not excusable because of the 
want of printed blank forms. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Navy Department, April 30, 1866. 



Circular Letter. 

May 7, 1866. 
Disbursing officers of the Navy stationed in the vicinity of the office of the U. S. 
Treasurer, or an assistant treasurer, will keep their deposits with such officer. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 
To Paymasters and Disbursing Officers. Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 75. 

May 23, 1866. 

Congress having, in view of the call for increased compensation to officers of the 
Navy, repealed the law which prohibited any allowance to them " for rent of quar- 
ters or to pay rent for furniture, or for lights or fuel, &c, &c," the Department, in 
order to prevent a recurrence of the irregularities, abuses, and arbitrary allowances 
which occasioned the prohibition, deems it proper to establish a fixed rate of com- 
pensation in lieu of the extra allowances which were prohibited by the law now re- 
pealed. Accordingly, from and after the first day of June proximo, officers who are 
not provided with quarters on shore stations will be allowed a sum equal to thirty- 
three and one-third per centum of their pay in lieu of all allowances, except for 
mileage or traveling expenses under orders; and those provided with such quarters, 
twenty per centum of their pay in lieu of said allowances. 

The act of March 3, 1865, having increased the pay of midshipmen and mates, the 
allowance hereby authorized will not be extended to them. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 55 



July 1, 1866. 

Whenever it shall become necessary for the Government to defray the funeral ex- 
penses of an officer of the Navy or Marine Corps, an amount not exceeding one 
month's sea pay of such officer will be allowed for that purpose, to be expended 
under the direction or with the approval of the commandant of the nearest naval 
station, the commander of a squadron, or of a single vessel -when hot in communica- 
tion with a superior officer. Naval officers are enjoined to aid in every proper man- 
ner in doing honor to the rank or station and services of deceased officers, petty offi- 
cers, seamen, and "marines. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

retary of the Nary. 



General Order, No. 77. 

Washington, August 1, 1866. 
Under authority of the act of Congress approved December 21, 1861, medals of 
honor are hereby awarded to the following-named persons who have di-tinguished 
themselves by their gallantry in action, by extraordinary heroism in the line of their 
profession, or by other commendable qualities: 
John Brown, captain of the after-guard; 
Richard Bates, seaman : 

Thomas Burke, seaman, of the U. S. S. De Soto. Heroic conduct in rescuing from 
drowning James Rose and John Russell, seamen, of the l T . S. S. Winooski, off 
Eastport, Maine, May 10, 1866. 
Thomas Robinson, captain of the after-guard of the \\ 8. 8. Tallapoosa. Heroio 
efforts to save from drowning Wellington Brooar, landsman, of the Tallapoosa, 
off New Orleans, July 15, 1866. 
Application for the medals must be made through the commanding officers of the 
vessels on which the seamen are serving. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Seen f'iri/ of t!<< Xnrii. 



Genera l Order, No. 78. 

August 4, 1866. 
Mates whose compensation under existing regulations does not exceed forty dol- 
lars per month, will hereafter be allowed a sum equal to twenty per centum of their 
pay, in lieu of all allowances except for mileage or traveling expenses under orders. 
This allowance to take effect from the 1st instant. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

8t < r< tary of Hn Navy. 



General Obder, No. 7i>. 

August 11, 1866. 
Officers who, after being ordered to duty, receive an advance ot'pa\ under the law 
authorizing the same, will, as early as practicable, give notice thereof in writing to 
the paymaster whose duty it will be to check such advance against the pay. Any 
officer delinquent in this particular, and receiving pay which should be checked, 
will be deemed guilty of . scandalous conduct as well as a violation of this order. 

GIDEON WELL! 

retary of the Navy. 



U. 8. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 4. 

August 22, 1866. 
The following alterations and additions are hereby made to the regulations pub- 
lished for the government of all persons attached to the United States na\ a] service, 
under date of April 18. L865, and will be obeyed accordingly. Every person subject 
to the control of the Navy Department will preserve a copy of this circular in his 
Book of Regulations. 

Section 10. 

Midshipmen, 

Paragraph 17H amended so as to read as folloAvs: If ordered to a cruising vessel, 
they shall provide, themselves with an octant or quadrant, an approved treatise on 
navigation, all the text-hooks used by them during the two last years of the course 
at the Naval Academy, including an approved treatise on marine surveying, and the 
following histories: Eliot's (or some other approved) abridged history of the United 
States; Irving's Life of Washington (small edition); The Student's (Hume's) History 



56 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS.' 

i 

of England, 1 vol., 8 vo.: Liddell's History of Rome, 1 vol., 8 vo.; Smith's Student 
(Gibbon), 1 vol., 8 vo.; Smith's History of Greece, 1 vol., 8 vo.; Students' History of 
France, 1 vol., 8 vo. 

Commanders of vessels will see that this regulation is strictly conformed to, and 
in the case of any midshipman failing to provide himself with the books and instru- 
ments embraced in paragraph 473 they will report the facts to the Department. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



August 25, 1866. 

A Board of naval officers, of which Commodore S. P. Lee is president, will meet 
at Hartford, Connecticut, on the 5th of September next, for the examination of vol- 
unteer officers who have served not less than two years in the Navy, for admission 
into the regular service, in accordance with the provisions of the following sections 
of the " Act to define and regulate the appointment of officers in the Navy, and for 
other purposes." Approved July 25, 1866. 

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That of the number of line officers of the Navy, 
on the active list, five lieutenant-commanders, twenty lieutenants, fifty masters, and 
8eventy-five ensigns may be appointed from those officers who have served in the 
volunteer naval service for a period of not less than two years, and who are either 
now in that service or have been honorably discharged therefrom : Provided, that if 
by reason of these appointments the number of officers in any grade shall exceed 
the number fixed by law, no more promotioDS or appointments to that grade shall 
be made until the number is reduced below the number fixed by law for that grade; 
And provided further, That the authority given by this section shall be exhausted 
when the number of volunteer officers above named shall have been once appointed. 

Sec. 3. And he it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Navy shall appoint a 
Board, consisting of not less than three naval officers superior in rank to the officers 
to be thus appointed in the regular Navy from the volunteer service, which Board, 
after examination of the claims of all candidates, shall select and report to the Sec- 
retary of the Navy the most meritorious in character, ability, professional compe- 
tency, and honorable service, the number to be appointed and transferred to the 
several grades mentioned in the second section of this act, Provided, they shall find 
that number who are suitably qualified therefor. And any officer who has served in 
the volunteer naval service for the term of two years or more shall have the right 
to appear before the Examining Board and present his claims and be examined for 
an appointment in the regular Navy; and any volunteer officers attached to vessels 
at sea or on foreign stations may be appointed to the regular Navy, subject to the 
conditions contained in this section, after their return to the United States. 

All persons who are entitled to examination under the provisions of the foregoing 
act, and who wish to avail themselves of its privileges, will at once notify the presi- 
dent of the Board, by letter addressed to Hartford, Conn., giving their own post- 
office address. In due time they will receive from him, in reply, a notification when 
to present themselves for examination. 

Those who fail to report at the time specified for them to do so^will forfeit all 
claim to precedence for examination. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Orl>er, No. 80. 

August 27, 1866. 

Wm. Ringgold Cooper, late an acting ensign in the Navy, having been convicted 
of defrauding the Government of large sums of money, by means of forged papers, 
will be considered as dishonorably discharged from the service by his arrest for the 
said offense August 2, 1866. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

September 29, 1866. 

On and after the first of November, 1866, the senior surgeon, paymaster, engineer, 
and marine officer in each squadron shall be recognized and considered respectively 
as Fleet Surgeon, Fleet Paymaster, Fleet Engineer, and Fleet Marine Officer, and in 
addition to their regular services as officers of the ship they will discharge the duties 
required by regulation of fleet officers. 

Special fleet officers will not be detailed except when the aggregate number of offi- 
cers and men attached to a squadron is twenty-five hundred or more, in accordance 
with paragraph 49, Regulation Circular No. 1. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 57 

Circular. 

November 10, 1866. 
A misconstruction having in some quarters been put upon General Order, No. 76, 
the Department informs commanding officers and others, whose approval to bills for 
funeral expenses is necessary, that it was not designed to change previously existing 
regulations in any other way than by fixing a limit (to correct a growing tendency to 
extravagance) beyond which funeral expenses would be disallowed. "Whenever it 
shall become necessary for the Government to defray the funeral expenses of an offi- 
cer of the Navy or Marine Corps," is not to be understood as changing the regula- 
tion prohibiting an allowance for such expenses "when the deceased has left effects 
sufficient to satisfy them." 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



General Order. No. 81. 

November 21, 1866. 

Whenever any one representing himself to be the father presents a boy, he being 
a minor, for enlistment as a naval apprentice or for the general naval service, he shall 
be required by the shipping officer to give a certificate of his consent to the enlist- 
ment of the said boy for the prescribed period of time, and in accordance with the 
terms of the enlistment regulations: and also to take and subscribe to an oath that 
he is the father of the boy thus presented. 

In case a woman y>resents a boy, being a minor, for enlistment as above, and repre- 
sents herself to be the mother of said boy, and that the fa1 her is not living, she shall 
be required to take and subscribe to an oath that .die is the mother of said boy, and 
that the father is not living, in addition to the certificate of consent as required in 
the case of a father. 

In case a person representing himself to be the guardian presents a minor forenlist- 
ment in the naval service, he shall be required to take and subscribe to an oath that 
he is the legally appointed guardian of said minor, and that the said minor has no 
other guardian, and that neither the father nor the mother of the minor presented 
by him is living, in addition to the certificate of consent required in the oases above 
of a father or mother. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

retary <>f the Navy. 



Circular. 

■8, U 

The designation of persons serving as surgeons 1 stewards is changed to thai of 
apothecary, and they will be appointed for dutj in the medical department of the 
Navy, ashore and afloat, in tin' same manner as surgeons' stewards have heretofore 
been appointed. 

Apothecaries of the firsl class will rank with boatswains, and will receive -7 
annum, excepl at the navy yard, Mare Island. California', where they will receive the 
same sum as is now allowed surgeons' stewards on thai station. 

Apothecaries of the second class will rank with boal wain's mates in charge, and 
will receive $40 per month. 

Apothecaries of the third class will rank with boatswain's mates, and will receive 
$30 per month. 

Apothecaries of the first class will be assigned to naval hospitals, navy yards, and 
receiving ships. 

Apothecaries of the second class will be assigned to \ « ■ si and 2d n 

Apothecaries of the third class will he assigned to vessels of 3d and 1th ! 

GIDEON WELLES, 

m levy of the Navy. 



Circular Letter. 

December 11, 1866. 
Commandants of navy yards and stations will see that naval officers attached to 
their commands attend personally to the duty to which they are assigned, and, except 
when given leave by competent authority, are at their respective posts daily during 
office hours as established by the commandant. Commandants of yards and stations 
will report without delay the names of those now under their command whose duties 
are nominal and can be dispensed with. 

Commandants will also establish hours for clerks and writers. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Commandants of Navy Yards. 



58 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 82. 

February 23, 1867. 

Medals of honor are awarded to the following-named seamen, who have distin- 
guished themselves hy gallant and meritorious acts, viz: 

Henry Johnson, seaman, U. S. S. Metacomet, who was one of the boat's crew which — 
during a heavy fire from the enemy — in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Nields, wert 
to the rescue of the officers and crew of the U. S. monitor Tecumseh when that vessel 
was sunk by a torpedo in passing the forts in Mobile Bay, August 5, 1864. 

John Robinson, captain of the hold, U. S. S. Yucca, who, with Acting Ensign James 
H. Bunting, during the heavy gale which occurred in Pensacola Bay, on the night of 
January 19, 1867, swam ashore with a line for the purpose of sending off a blow-cock, 
which would facilitate getting up steam and prevent the vessel from stranding, thus 
voluntarily periling his life to save the vessel and the lives of others. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

March 14, 1867. 
Sir: Congress having required the Department, by an act approved March 2, 1867, 
entitled "An act for the relief of certain contractors for the construction of vessels- 
of-war and steam machinery" (a copy of which is annexed), to ascertain and report 
certain information relative to claims for increased cost in the construction of war 
vessels and steam machinery, you are desired, if you come within the provisions of 
the act, to furnish, in writing, information upon the following points: 

1. Name of contractor. 

2. Date of contract, contract date for completion, and date when actually completed. 

3. Name of vessel built, or vessel for which machinery was constructed. 

4. Contract price. 

5. Total amount received, for extra work and alterations. 

6. A particular statement of any " changes or alterations in the plans and specifi- 
cations. 

7. Copies of all orders requiring such changes or alterations. 

8. The cost necessarily incurred in making such changes or alterations. 

9. The amount received from the Department in payment for such changes or alter- 
ations. 

10. A full statement of " delays in the prosecution of the work occasioned by the 
Government, which were not provided for in the contract,'' and how such delays 
were occasioned. 

11. How long the changes or alterations delayed the completion of the work pro- 
vided for in the contract, giving the necessary dates. 

12. A particular statement of the increased cost of labor, during such prolonged time 
for completing the work required in the original contract, giving the number of days' 
work by different classes of workmen, the cost of labor when such work would have 
been done but for the delays, and the amount actually paid for said labor. 

13. A particular statement of the material required by reason of changes or delays, 
which could not have been avoided by the exercise of ordinary prudence and diligence 
on the part of the contractor, the portion of the vessel or engine for which such ma- 
terial was required, the cost at the time it would have been purchased and its actual 
cost, giving dates. 

14. A. bill in form, embracing only those items, clearly and succinctly stated, upon 
which your claim is founded, with the amount claimed affixed to each item. 

Copies of all letters or orders of the officer directing changes, alterations, or delays, 
and the price of material and labor at different periods embraced in the time covered 
by each, should be given, with a reference, if possible, to authorities upon these 
points. 

The statement herein called for is required on or before the 1st of June, next, and 
contractors who make no claim under the act are desired to notify the Department. 
Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Wavy. 



Circular Relative to Duties of Bureaus. 

July 1, 1867. 
Bureau of Yards and Docks. 

The duties of the Bureau of Yards and Docks shall comprise all that relates to the 
construction and maintenance of all docks, slips, wharves, piers, quay walls, and 
buildings of all kinds, for whatever purpose needed, within the limits of the navy 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 59 

yards: but not of hospitals and magazines outside of those limits, nor of buildings 
for which it does not estimate. It shall prepare the plans and make the estimates 
for the above constructions, in consultation with the chief of the Bureau for whose 
use they are designed as to their internal arrangements and location in the yard. 

It shall be charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all land and buildings 
connected with the navy yards. 

It shall have under its sole control the general administration of the navy yards, 
and shall provide all the water and gas for all the buildings and for whatever other 
purposes they may be needed, and all the fuel, except what is to be furnished by the 
other bureaus. 

It shall provide all landings, derricks, sheers, cranes, sewers, dredging, railway 
tracks, cars and wheels, trucks, grading, paving, walks, shade-Trees, enclosure walls 
and fences, ditching, reservoirs, cisterns, fire-engines and apparatus, and all things 
necessary, including labor, for the cleaning of the yards and the protection of the 
public property. 

It shall have under its sole control the business of the commandant's office and of 
the accountant's office, including the employment of clerks, messengers, and laborers; 
and it shall furnish all the stationery, blank books and forms, and pay all the expenses 
of those offices. 

It shall furnish the oxen, horses, and hired teams required for all the purposes of 
the yard, the subsistence and care for the same, and the necessary teamsters. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, materials, means and 
appliances of every kind used for its purposes, including fuel, and transport, erect, 
and repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all work done under it. 

It shall have under its sol*; control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing writers and draughtsmen at the yards, masters, workmen, and laborers, paid 
from its funds, and connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary bo carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Hunan of Equipment and Recruiting. 

The duties of the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting shall comprise all that 
relates to the recruiting and estimating for the pay of all seamen, ordinary seamen, 
landsmen, and boys for the general service, and i<> the equipment of all vessels in 
commission with rigging, blocks, sails, anchors and cables, fuel, and yeoman's stores 
not provided by other Bureaus, and to the furnishing of all vessels with fuel for all 
purposes. 

It shall have under its sole control all rendezvous and receiving skips, and it shall 
provide transportation for all enlisted persons. 

It shall have under its sole control the rope walks, and t he shops fo] making anchors 
and cables, rigging, blocks and sails, galleys and cooking utensils. 

It shall design the various shops and buildings where its work is executed, so far 

only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and. after their completion, shall 
have exclusive, cont rol of t he same : but the construct ing and repairing of these shops 
and buildings shall not be done by the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, nor 

shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, -lores, stationery, blank books 
and forms used in the equipping and recruiting department, materials, means and 
appliances of every kind nsed in its buildings and shops, and transport, erect, and 
repair the same, it shall also furnish all the fuel, wood and coal, used for ail pur- 
poses on board of all vessels. 

It shall make all contracts for ami superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, Inspection, storing, and preser- 
vation of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, 
including writers, masters, workmen, and laborers connected with it and used entirely 
for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Bureau of Navigation, 

The duties of the. Bureau of Navigation shall comprise all that relates to the Naval 
Academy, Naval Observatory, Nautical Almanac, Hydrographic Office, and the naval 
apprentice system. 



60 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

It shall furnish navigation supplies and stores of all kinds, including charts, nauti- 
cal and navigating instruments and hooks, sailing directions and instructions, sta- 
tionery and blank hooks for commanding and navigating officers ashore and afloat, 
libraries, hinnacles, flags, signals, signal lights, running ]ights, and standing lights 
on hoard vessels, logs, leads, lines, and glasses, log-hooks, illuminating oil for all 
purposes, except what is used in the engineer department of steamers. 

It will pay for the local pilotage of all vessels in commission," and it will estimate 
for the pay and transportation of the officers of the Navy. 

It shall have the sole control of the apartments assigned for its purposes and for 
the use of the navigation officers in the yards and stations, and it will provide the 
instruments, furniture, writers, draughtsmen, messengers, and lahorers for the same. 

It shall he charged with the collection of foreign surveys, publication of charts, 
sailing directions, and nautical works, and the dissemination of nautical and hydro- 
graphical information to the Navy and mercantile marine. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the stores, materials, instruments, means 
and appliances of every kind used for its purposes, and shall have under its sole con- 
trol their inspection, storing, and preservation. 

It shall design, erect, and maintain all the buildings at the Naval Academy, the 
Observatory, and elsewhere not within navy yards, that may he needed for its pur- 
poses; and it shall he charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all land and 
buildings in connection therewith. 

It shall provide all the tools, shops, machinery, means and appliances needed for 
educational purposes at the Naval Academy, and all things necessary, including labor, 
for the proper protection of the public property at the Academy and Observatory. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the lahor, includ- 
ing writers, calculators, and draughtsmen, masters, workmen, and lahorers connected 
with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be addressed 
to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Bureau of Ordnance. 

The duties of the Bureau of Ordnance shall comprise all that relates to magazines 
and to the manufacture and use of ordnance and ammunition, to the storing and 
preservation of the same, and to the mounting of the ordnance on board vessels. 

It shall design the various shops and buildings at the navy yards where its work 
is executed so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same; but the construction and repair- 
ing of those shops and buildings shall not be done by the Bureau of Ordnance, nor 
shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall design, erect, and maintain all the shops and buildings constructed for its 
purposes outside the limits of navy yards, and for which it may have estimated; 
and it shall be charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all land and buildings 
in connection therewith, and with the preservation of the public property under its 
control. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, blank books 
and forms, materials, means and appliances of every kind used in its shops, includ- 
ing fuel, and transport, erect, and repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing writers and draughtsmen, masters, workmen, and laborers connected with it and 
used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Bureau of Construction and Repair. 

The duties of the Bureau of Construction and Repair shall comprise all that relates 
to designing, building, fitting, and repairing the wood or iron hulls of vessels, the 
armor plating, turrets, spars, boats, tanks, ballast, casks, furniture, and sea stores 
of the kind used by it in building vessels, 

It shall design the slips and the various buildings and shops where its work is 
executed so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same, including drydocks; but the 
constructing and repairing of these buildings, slips, and docks shall not be done by 
the Bureau of Construction and Repair, nor shall the cost thereof he defrayed by it. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 61 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, books and 
forms required in the constructor's department, materials, means and appliances of 
every kind used in its buildings and shores, including fuel, and transport, erect, and 
repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the "work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing writers and draughtsmen at the yards and stations, masters, workmen, and 
laborers connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall have the sole control of the vessels in ordinary and under repair, and of 
mooring, docking, and transporting them, including the persons having the care of 
them. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Bureau of strain Engineering. 

The duties of the Bureau of Steam Engineering shall comprise all that relates to 
the designing, building, fitting out, repairing, and engineering of the steam machinery 
used in naval vessels. 

It shall design the various shops at the navy yards and stations where the work is 
executed so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same: but the construction and repair- 
ing of these shops shall not be done by the Bureau of Steam Engineering, nor shall 
the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, blank books 
and forms used in the engineer department, materials, means and appliances of every 
kind used in its shops, including fuel, and on board vessels, excluding fuel, and trans- 
port, erect, and repair the same. 

It shall make all the contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing writers and draughtsmen at the yards and stations, masters, workmen, and laborers 
connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

Itshall estimate for and pay from its own funds the oosl necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. 

The duties of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing shall comprise all that relates 
to supplying the Navy with provisions, clothing, small Stores, water, and contingent 
stores in the paymaster's department. 

Itshall design the various buildings and shops at the navy yards where its work 
is executed so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same; but the construction and 
repairing of those buildings and shops shall not be done by the Bureau of Provisions 
and Clothing, nor shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, blank books 
and forms used in pay and provisions department, materials, means and appliances 
of every kind used in its shops; and on board vessels it shall furnish all the stores 
connected with the paymaster's department, including potable water, other than that 
which is supplied by the distilling apparatus attached to the machinery of steamers. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing writers, masters, workmen, and laborers connected with it and used entirely for 
its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, accounts, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties 
shall be addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 

The duties of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery shall comprise all that relates 
to laboratories, naval hospitals, and dispensaries. 

It shall furnish all the supplies, medicines, and instruments required in the medi- 
cal department of the navy. 

It shall have the sole control of all buildings erected for its purposes. 



62 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

It shall determine ux>on and furnish all the stores, stationery, blank books and 
forms used in the medical and hospital departments, materials, instruments, means 
and appliances of every kind used for its purposes; and shall have under its sole 
control their inspection, storing, transportation, and preparation. 

It shall design, erect, and maintain all the buildings constructed for its purposes 
outside the limits of the navy yards and for which it may have, estimated; and it 
shall be charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all land and buildings in 
connection therewith, and with the preservation of the public property under its 
control. 

It shall design the various buildings erected within navy yards for its purposes so 
far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their completion, 
shall have exclusive control of t tie same; but the construction and repairing of these 
buildings shall not be done by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, nor shall the 
cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall have under its sole control the pay, organization, and mustering of the 
labor of all kinds connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out the 
duties as above denned. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navg. 

Circular. July 6, 1867. 

Hereafter, when the Bureaus have property to be sold at auction they will direct 
the commandants of the navy yards to employ a licensed auctioneer. 

Very respectfully, 

GIDEON WELLES, 
To Chiefs of Bureaus. Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 6. 

July 20, 1867. 

The following alterations and additions are hereby made to the Regulations pub- 
lished for the government of all persons attached to the United States naval service, 
under date of April 18, 1865, and will be obeyed accordingly. 

Every person subject to the control of the Navy Department will preserve this 
circular in his Book of Regulations. 

1. First and second assistant engineers, being now commissioned, are no longer 
regarded as steerage officers. For want of sufficient ward-room accommodations, 
they will room and mess in conformity with existing regulations, but they are en- 
titled to all other privileges of commissioned officers, with whom they have relative 
rank. 

2. The shoulder strap of an ensign will be a silver foul anchor in .the center, with 
a silver cord one-eighth of an inch in diameter, extending across the field of the strap 
one-eighth of an inch from each end. 

3. Midshipmen, after graduation, will wear a silver foul anchor in the center of the 
strap. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

September 1, 1867. 

The designation of persons serving as " paymasters' stewards" is changed to that 
of "paymasters' writers," and they will be selected for duty in the Pay Department 
of the Navy, ashore and afloat, in the same manner as paymasters' stewards have 
heretofore been selected. 

Paymasters' writers of the 1st class will rank with boatswains, and will receive 
$750 per annum. 

Paymasters' writers of the 2d class will rank with boatswains' mates in charge, 
and will receive $40 per month. 

Paymasters' writers of the 3d class will rank with boatswains' mates, and will re- 
ceive $33 per month. 

Paymasters' writers of the 1st class will be allowed to navy yards, receiving ships, 
and the Naval Academy. 

Paymasters' writers of the 2d class will be allowed to vessels of 1st and 2d rates, 
to storeships, and to 3d and 4th rates where no paymasters' clerk is allowed. 

Paymasters' writers of the 3d class will be allowed to vessels of 3d and 4th rates, 
where paymasters' clerks are allowed. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 






GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 63 

General Order, No. 83. 

September 10, 1867. 

A proclamation issued by the President on the third day of September, 1867, is, 
by his direction, herewith transmitted, warning all persons against obstructing or 
hindering, in any manner, the faithful execution of the constitution and the laws, 
and enjoining and commanding all officers of the Government, civil and military, to 
render due submission to the laws and to the judgments and decrees of the courts 
of the United States, and to give all the aid in their power necessary to the prompt 
enforcement of such laws, decrees, judgments, and processes; and especially enjoin- 
ing upon the officers of the Army and Navy to assist and maintain the courts, and 
other civil authorities of the United States, in a faithful administration of the laws. 

The orders and requirements of the proclamation, and the exhortation of the Pres- 
ident to all well-disposed citizens to testify their devotion to their country, their 
pride in its prosperity and greatness, and their determination to uphold its free in- 
stitutions by a hearty co-operation in the efforts of the Government to sustain the 
authority of the law, to maintain the supremacy of the Federal Constitution, and 
to preserve unimpaired the integrity of the National Union, will, the Department 
feels confident, command the earnest support and receive a willing and hearty re- 
sponse from every one connected with the Department and the naval service. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

retary of the Navy. 

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STAT] B. 

A PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas, by the Constitution of the United States, the executive power is vested 
in a President of the United States of America, who is bound by solemn oath faith- 
fully to execute the office of President, and to the best of his ability to preserve, 
protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States; and is by the same in- 
strument made Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and 
is required to take care that the laws be faithfully executed ; 

And whereas, by the same constitution, it is provided thai the said constitution 
and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof shall 
be the supreme law of the laud, and the judges in ei ery State shall be hound thereby: 

And WHEREAS in and by the same constitution the judicial power of the United 
States is vested in one Supreme Court and in such inferior courts as Congress may 
from time to time ordain and establish, and the aforesaid judicial power is declared 
to extend to all cases in law and equity arising under the constitution, the Laws of 
the United States, and t he t reaties which shall be made under their authority ; 

And whereas all officers, civil and military, are hound by oath that they will 
support and defend the constitut ion against all enemies, foreigu and domestic, and 
will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; 

And whereas all officers of the Army and Navy of the United States, in accept- 
ing their commissions under the laws of Congress and the rules and articles of war, 
incur an obligation to observe, obey, and follow such directions as they shall from 
time to time receive from the President or the General, or other superior officers set 
over them, according to the rules and discipline of war ; 

And whereas it is provided by law that whenever, by reason of unlawful obstruc- 
tions, combinations, or assemblages of persons, or rebellion against the authority of 
the Government of the United States, it shall become impracticable in the judgment 
of the President of the United States to enforce, by the ordinary course of judicial 
proceedings, the laws of the United States within any State or Territory, the Execu- 
tive in that case is authorized and required to secure their faithful execution by the 
employment of the land and naval forces; 

And whereas impediments and obstructions, serious in their character, have re- 
cently been interposed in the States of North Carolina and South Carolina, hinder- 
ing and preventing for a time a proper enforcement there of the laws of the United 
States, and of the judgments and decrees of a lawful court thereof, in disregard of 
the command of the President of the United States; 

And whereas reasonable and well-founded apprehensions exist that such ill-ad- 
vised and unlawful proceedings may be again attempted there aud elsewhere: 
■ Now, therefore, I, ANDREW JOHNSON. President of the United States, do 
hereby warn all persons against obstructing or hindering in any manner whatsoever 
the faithful execution of the constitution and the laws; and I do solemnly enjoin and 
command all officers of the Government, civil and military, to render due submission 
and obedience to said laws, and to the judgments and decrees of the courts of the 
United States, and to give all the aid in their power necessary to the prompt enforce- 
ment and execution of such laws, decrees, judgments, and processes. 



64 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

And I do hereby enjoin upon the officers of the Army and Navy to assist and sus- 
tain the courts and other civil authorities of the United States in a faithful admin- 
istration of the laws thereof, and in the judgments, decrees, mandates, and processes 
of the courts of the United States; and I call upon all good and well-disposed citi- 
zens of the United States to remember that upon the said constitution and laws, 
and upon the judgment, decrees, and processes of the courts made in accordance 
with the same, depend the protection of the lives, liberty, property, and happiness 
of the people And I exhort them everywhere to testify their devotion to their 
country, their pride in its prosperity and greatness, and their determination to up- 
hold its free institutions by a hearty co-operation in the efforts of the Government 
to sustain the authority of the law, to maintain the supremacy of the Federal Con- 
stitution, and to preserve unimpaired the integrity of the National Union. 

In testimony whereof, I have caused the seal of the United States to be affixed to 
these presents, and sign the same with my hand. 

Done at the city of Washington the third day of September, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven. 
[l. s.] ANDREW JOHNSON. 

By the President: 

William H. Seward, 

Secretary of State. 



General Order, No. 84. 

October 3, 1867. 

Medals of honor are awarded to the following-named persons who have performed 
signal acts of valor in the naval service: 

Charles H. Weeks, captain foretop, U. S. S. Susquehanna. On the 21st of Septem- 
ber, 1861, the U. S. S. Montauk, then off Charleston, was discovered to be on fire in 
the magazine light-room, on which occasion Clias. H. Weeks, who was master-at-arms 
of the vessel, displayed great presence of mind and rendered valuable services in 
extinguishing the fire. 

Thomas Kane, captain of the hold, U. S. S. Nereus. who, on the occasion of the 
assault on Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, bahaved with conspicuous -gallantry, hav- 
ing, under a heavy fire of musketry, carried on his back a wounded messmate to a 
place of safety, and fearlessly exposed himself in assisting other wounded comrades 
whose lives were endangered. 

Frank du Moulin, apprentice, U. S. S. Sabine, who, on the 5th of September, 1867, 
jumped overboard and saved from drowning apprentice D'Orsay, who had fallen 
from the mizzen topmast rigging of the Sabine, in New London Harbor, and was 
rendered helpless by striking the mizzen rigging and boat-davit in the fall. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order. No. 85. 

October 11, 1867. 
At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened on the 2d instant at the navy yard, 
Portsmouth, N. H., Second Assistant Engineer George F. Sawyer, of the Navy, was 
tried on the following charge and specification: 

Charge. — " Using language disrespectful to the President of the United States." 
Specification — "In this: that on or about the eleventh day of September, eighteen 
hundred and sixty-seven, on board the U. S. steamer Emerald, at Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, the said Second Assistant Engineer George F. Sawyer, U. S. 
Navy, in the presence of officers of the Navy, and others, used language dis- 
respectful to the President of the United States, declaring that the President 
had violated his pledges to the people and ought to be impeached." 
Of which charge the accused was found guilty and sentenced by the Court: "To 
be suspended from rank and duty for the period of one year, and to be placed upon half of 
1 Waiting Orders 7 pay during that time, and to be publicly reprimanded by the Honorable Sec- 
retary of the Navy." 

The finding and sentence of the Court are approved, and Second Assistant Engineer 
George F. Sawyer will accordingly be suspended for the period of one year from this 
date on half of "Waiting Orders" pay. 

In carrying into execution that part of the sentence which requires that Sec- 
ond Assistant Engineer Sawyer be publicly reprimanded, the Department hereby 
admonishes that officer that the punishment awarded by the Court in his case must 
be regarded as lenient. An officer who is so grossly ignorant as not to know that 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 65 

the President is Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy, or who is so insubordi- 
nate in spirit that he will not hesitate to denounce and treat with disrespect the 
Chief Magistrate, or any superior officer, however exalted in rank, is not only want- 
ing in the qualities of a gentleman, but is wholly unfit for military service. What- 
ever latitude of denunciation or abuse civilians may choose to indulge in with regard 
to the authorities of government, officers of the Navy can claim no such privilege, 
even under the plea that they have a right to express their opinions on political 
subjects. Such license is utterly incompatible with the existence of military disci- 
pline, and at the same time is unnecessary to the most perfect freedom of opinion 
either in politics or religion. A naval officer should be a gentleman in language and 
deportment. Good sense and good breeding will always enable any individual to 
express his opinions without giving just cause of offense, and the officer who cannot 
do so is as much deficient in those qualities as he is in a sense of military duty when 
he treats his superior with disrespect. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

December 30, 1867. 
Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps, in the city of Washington, are notified to 
assemble at the Navy Department at 11 a. m. on Wednesday, January 1st, 1868, and 
thence proceed to pay their respects to the President of the United States. Officers 
will appear in full dress-uniform for official visits on shore. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

n la ry of the Xary. 



General Order, No. 86. 

February 10, 1868. 
At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the navy yard at W\\ York, Janu- 
ary 3, 1868, Captain Napoleon Collins, of the Navy, was tried upon the following 
charge and specification : 

Charge. — " Suffering a vessel of the Navy to be run upon a shoal through inattention." 
Specification — "In this: that on or about the nineteenth day of Jane, eighteen hun- 
dred and sixty-seven, the said Captain Napoleon Collins, of the U. 8. Navy, being 
then in command of the l\ S. 8. Sacramento, did, through inattention, sutler 
the said vessel to be run upon a shoal at the mouth of the Kathapalam river, 
coast of Coromandel, and wrecked." 
Of which charge and specification he was found guilty, and sentenced as follows: 
"To be suspended for the term of three years from rank and duty, during which 
period of time he shall receive only the pay of officers of the grade of captain on the 
retired list, and his suspension from rank shall only affect his promotion to a higher 
grade; and to be publicly reprimanded by the Bonorable Secretary of the Navy.' 

At the same Court Lieutenant Commander George M. Bache, of the Navy. was tried 
upon the following charge and specification: 

Charge. — "Suffering a vessel of the Navy to be run upon a shoal through inattention." 
Specification — " In this: that on or about the nineteenth day of .Line, eighteen hun- 
dred and sixty-seven, the said Lieutenant Commander Geo. M. Bache, of the 
U. S. Navy, being then attached to the U. S. 8. Sacramento as navigating 
officer, did, through inattention, suffer the said vessel to be run upon a shoal 
at the mouth of the Kathapalam river, coast of Coromandel, and wrecked." 
Of which charge and specification he was found guilty, and sentenced as follows: 
"To be suspended from duty, on the retired pay of his grade, for the term of one 
year, and to be publicly reprimanded by the Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

The findings and sentences of the Court in these cases are approved. Captain 
Napoleon Collins and Lieutenant Commander George M. Bache will be considered as 
suspended, from this date, in conformity with their respective sentences. 

The Department finds in these, as in most cases, some difficulty in carrying into 
execution that part of the judgment of the Court which requires a public reprimand 
to be administered. To an officer jealous of his reputation, and desirous of preserv- 
ing an unspotted official record, conviction and sentence by a court-martial are a 
sufficient reprimand and a permanent admonition ; and the Department has no doubt 
that this will be the case with the officers whose names it regrets to promulgate in 
this General Order. Their official standing has been high and their patriotism well 
tested. 

The Department must avail itself of this occasion to correct an erroneous impres- 
sion, which, it would appear, by the line of defense adopted in behalf of one of these 
officers, is entertained as to the responsibility of commanding and navigating officers. 

5 



66 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

If public property to a large amount is lost, and the lives of a numerous crew are 
placed in imminent jeopardy while under the care of officers whose special duty it is 
to guard them from danger, and who are well compensated for the discharge of this 
duty, the Department, as well as the public, will cast upon these officers the burden 
of proving that the loss did not occur from any negligence on their part, and they 
will not be permitted by a military court to profit by the technical pleas and quib- 
bles which have been worn out in the service of petty criminals before the lowest civil 
courts. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

February 27, 1868. 
A clerical error having occurred in the pay-table prefixed to the Navy Register for 
1868, in stating the retired pay of engineers, paymasters will take notice that the 
retired pay of 1st and 2d assistant engineers not retired on furlough pay is one-half 
of the sea pay of their respective grades. 

GIDEON WELLES, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

Regulations for the Admission of Apprentices to the Navy Yards of the 

United States. 

July 15, 1868. 

Hereafter the following rules will govern the employment of apprentices in the 
navy yards : 

Applicants must be over 15 and under 17 years of age. They must furnish the com- 
mandant of the navy yard with satisfactory evidence of good character, and with a 
certificate from the medical officer of the navy yard that they are physically able to 
perform the labor of the trade to which they are to be apprenticed. 

As a general rule preference will be given to the children of master workmen, quar- 
termen, and mechanics, who have faithfully served in navy yards, and of seamen, in 
the order named. 

The commandant of the navy yard will appoint a board, to assemble on the 1st of 
January and 1st of July of each year, composed of a commissioned naval officer, the 
chief of the respective department, his assistant, and two master workmen or fore- 
men, to examine all apprentices and applicants. 

The board will report on the character, aptness for anyjaarticular trade, and gen- 
eral merits of each applicant, who must be able to read, write legibly, and operate 
the first four rules of arithmetic. Only applicants enough to fill the vacancies will 
be reported for appointment, and they will be those whom the board consider the 
most competent. 

Each apprentice will be examined semi-annually as to his proficiency and improve- 
ment, and may be required to solve problems or perform pieces of work by and in the 
presence of the board. The apprentices who have been idle, or who have not made 
a reasonable improvement since their last examination, will be reported for dismissal. 
Apprentices shall be subject to dismissal at any time by the Secretary of the Navy. 

The report of the board will be transmitted to the Bureau for the action of the 
Department. 

A record will be kept in the office of the commandant of each yard, in which will 
be recorded the dates of all appointments and dismissals, the ages, the reports of 
character, and other matters relating to apprentices, which record will be open to 
the board of examiners. 

No person in the employment of the Government shall receive any part of an 
apprentice's wages, or any gratuity for or on account of him; but the wages will be 
paid over to the parent or guardian, as may be determined by the commandant of 
the yard. 

All necessary tools which it is usual for mechanics to furnish shall be supplied by 
the parent or guardian ; failing in which, the chiefs of the respective departments 
will see that they are provided, and their cost deducted from the wages of the appren- 
tice. 

The wages of an apprentice until he shall arrive at the age of 17 years will be -ftfe, 
for the next year f^-, for the next -ffa, for the next yVfo and for the last year -, 7 5 - of 
the rate of wages paid to the first-class journeymen workmen of the department in 
which he serves. The pay clerk shall have access to the apprentice book to ascertain 
the rate of wages to be allowed. 

The master workmen, or others in charge of apprentices, will report their conduct 
and progress monthly, in writing, to the chiefs of the respective departments, who 
will forward the reports to the commandant, with such remarks as they think neces- 
sary. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 67 

Whenever work shall he suspended the apprentices shall he discontinued, unless 
otherwise ordered by the chief of the proper Bureau. Upon the renewal of work, 
they shall he continued on the same terms, except that they will receive no pay during 
ahsence. 

All complaints ahout apprentices shall he at once examined hy the commandant, 
and such measures shall he taken as he may deem proper, only reporting to the proper 
Bureau if, in his opinion, the case requires dismissal or the action of the Department. 
At the expiration of apprenticeship, or at the next succeeding examination, the 
apprentices who pass a satisfactory examination hy the hoard shall receive certifi- 
cates stating that they have served, their full time, and also their good conduct and 
proficiency, signed hy the commandant of the station and the chiefs of the respective 
departments, and countersigned hy the chief of the proper Bureau. These certificates 
shall entitle the holders to preference over other applicants equally qualified for 
employment or promotion at the several navy yards, according to their merits at the 
time their services shall he required. 

The number of apprentices to be allowed will be determined from time to time by 
the Secretary of the Navy. 

John Lenthall, Chief of Bureau of Construction and Repairs. 
M. Smith, Chief of Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. 
B. F. Isherwood, Chief of Bureau of Steam Engineering. 
Approved : 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular Letter. 

July 29, 1868. 
Sir: Whenever it becomes necessary for a chief of a Bureau to be absent, he will 
notify the Department in season to have provision made for discharging his duties, 
in accordance with a recently-enacted law. 

Very respectfully, GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of tin Navy. 
To Chiefs of Bureaus. 

General Order, No. 87. 

8eptt mber 7, 1868. 

Chief Engineer Mortimer Kellogg has been reported to the Department for the fol- 
lowing offenses, committed by him while attached as chief engineer to the U. S. 
steamer De Soto : 

1st. On the 28th of May, 1868, refusing to obey an order given to him hy the execu- 
tive officer of the De Soto. 

2d. On the 5th of July, 1868, depriving Midshipman .J. N. Hemphill of the command 
of the ship's dingy and assuming command himself. 

3d. On the 14th of July, 1868, hailing a boat from the quarter-deck, in the presence 
of the officer of the deck, after the latter had refused to hail the boat. 

These offenses appear to have been deliberately committed by Chief Engineer Kel- 
logg under the impression that his seniority of rank entitled him to disregard the 
authority of any junior officer, whether of the line or stall ; and the J 'epaitment would 
have no hesitation in directing his trial by a court-mai t ial hut for the consideration 
that the judgment of the court in a case of this character might not be regarded as 
altogether impartial, and the consideration, also, that many staff officers may not be 
well informed of the extent of the privileges accruing from their relative rank. 

A little reflection will suggest to any intelligent staff officer that his rank must 
necessarily be merely assimilated; that the line and staff officers receive a distinct 
training and education, qualifying them for distinct duties, and that a surgeon, pay- 
master, or engineer is no more expected to direct the movements of a ship of war, 
discipline her men, or manage her batteries or appurtenances, than the commander, 
executive officer, or any line officer could be expected to perform the duties of a sur- 
geon or paymaster. 

The law on each occasion of granting assimilated rank has carefully provided that 
such rank " confers no authority to exercise command;" and the Navy ^Regulations 
specify distinctly the only circumstances under which line and staff officers will take 
precedence according to relative rank. The privileges of assimilated rank have been 
extended by the Department as far as it can be done with due regard to discipline 
and efficiency; and it is to be regretted that the result of these concessions is a dis- 
position, in any quarter, to grasp at or insist on further privileges. 

This disposition cannot be encouraged by the Department, and, after this admoni- 
tion, there will be no hesitation in subjecting such cases as this of Chief Engineer 
Kellogg to the action of a court-martial. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



68 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Circular. 

January 25, 1869. 
Officers of the Navy who are ordered to report to a hoard of examining officers, in 
pursuance of the act of April 21, 1864, for examination as to their mental, moral, and 
professional fitness to perform all their duties at sea in a higher grade, are informed 
that such examining hoards are instructed by the Department to be governed in their 
decision not merely by the evidence or testimonials presented to them, but are to 
ascertain the fitness of the candidate for promotion by a rigorous personal examina- 
tion, particularly as to his professional knowledge and. qualifications. 

GIDEON WELLES, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



March 10, 1869. 

Commanding officers hereafter, before approving requisitions upon this Department 
for money, will — 

First. Inform themselves fully of the amount of funds already in the hands of the 
officer making the requisition. 

Second. Ascertain definitely the objects for which additional funds are required, 
and in no case append their approval unless fully satisfied the interests of the service 
require it. 

Paymasters are strictly enjoined to limit their requisitions on the Department to 
such amounts as are absolutely necessary for immediate use. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 89. 

March 10, 1869. 

Commanding and executive officers, ashore and afloat, will take precedence over 
all staff officers. 

A. E. BORIE, 

* Secretary of the Navy. 

General Orders, No. 90. 

March 11, 1869. 

For the present, the following changes will be made in the uniform of the United 
States Navy : 

The full-dress coat of the Admiral will have three strips of gold embroidered 
white-oak leaves, one inch wide and half an inch apart, on the sleeve, and one strip 
of the same size and pattern on the collar (as per pattern). 

The full-dress sword-belt of the Admiral will be of blue cloth with a small gold 
cord around the edge, and one strip of gold embroidered white-oak leaves, one-half 
inch wide, running through the center. 

The sling-straps to be of blue cloth with a small gold thread around the edge. 

The full-dress coat of the Vice-Admiral will be the same as for the Admiral, except 
that there will be but two strips of embroidery on the sleeve. 

The full-dress coat of a Rear Admiral will be the same as for the Vice-Admiral, ex- 
cept that there will be but one strip of embroidery on the sleeve. 

The undress coat of the Admiral will have one strip of gold lace two inches wide 
around the cuff, with three strips of half-inch gold lace, one-quarter of an inch apart, 
above (as per pattern). 

The undress coat of the Vice-Admiral will be the same as for the Admiral, except 
that there will be but two strips of half-inch gold lace above the wide lace. 

The undress coat of a Rear Admiral will be the same as for a Vice-Admiral, except 
there will be but one strip of half-inch gold lace above the wide lace. 

Captains will wear three strips of half-inch gold lace, one-quarter of an inch apart, 
on the sleeve of full-dress and undress coats. 

Commanders will wear two strips of half-inch gold lace, three-quarters of an inch 
apart, and one strip of quarter-inch lace between them. 

Lieutenant-commanders will wear two strips of half-inch gold lace, one-quarter of 
an inch apart. 

Lieutenants will wear one strip of half-inch gold lace, and one strip of quarter-inch 
lace one-quarter of an inch above. 

Masters will wear one strip of half-inch lace. 

Ensigns will wear one strip of quarter-inch lace. 

Midshipmen, after graduation, will hereafter be allowed a full-dress double-breasted 
coat, nine buttons in each row, with a gold cord one-eighth of an inch wide around 
the sleeve, and an anchor in gold embroidery on each side of the collar, one inch in 
length (as per pattern). 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 69 

i 

Midshipmen, at the Naval Academy, will wear a strip of lace one-eighth of an inch 
wide, around the outer edge of the collar of their parade jackets. Parade jackets 
will only he worn on Sundays, dress parades, or other occasions of ceremony. 

No officer in the Navy below the assimilated rank of lieutenant will wear shoulder- 
straps, cocked hat, or epaulettes. 

In lieu of shoulder-straps, warraut officers shall wear as follows: 

Boatswains and gunners, a gold embroidered star on each side of the collar, similar 
to that worn on the sleeve. 

Carpenters and sailmakers will wear a diamond or lozenge embroidered in gold, 
one and one-eighth inches in extreme length, on each side of the collar. 

The cap ornament for all commissioned officers in the Navy will be a silver-shield 
with two crossed anchors in gold, arranged as per pattern. A gold cord of the same 
pattern as the one now worn by the midshipmen at the Naval Academy will be worn 
on the front of the cap by all officers. 

Staff officers of assimilated .rank will conform to the above regulations. 

Medical officers will wear around the sleeve cobalt blue cloth, between the strips 
of gold lace. 

Paymasters will wear around the sleeve white cloth, between the strips of gold 
lace. 

Engineers will wear arottnd the sleeve red cloth, between the strips of gold lace. 

Staff officers entitled to but one strip of lace on the sleeve will wear the colored 
cloth so as to show one-fourth of an inch above and below the strip. 

With the above-mentioned exceptions, the uniform of the Navy will remain as 
heretofore. 

\. E. BORIE, 

n turn of tin Navy. 



General Order, No. 91. 

March 11. 1869. 
Before an officer takes command of a vessel she must be examined by a hoard con- 
sisting of three line officers of the Navy, who shall report any deficiencies, dke., that 
may exist. 
No ship will carry more than two boat-davits on each quarter. 

The boats may he hung double; but if this cannot be done, they must be stowed 
inboard. When the latter course is impossible, the matter must be brought to the 
notice of the Department. 

A. E. BORIE, 

retary of th<' .\<ir;i. 



March 11. 1809. 

From and after this date the practice of covering the berth-deeks of vessels-of-war 
with shellac will be dispensed with. 

A. E. BOEIE, 

retary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 93. 

March 11, 1869. 
From and after the date of this order the Bpars of ships-of-wai will not be painted 
yellow as heretofore, and their yards will be painted black. 
A return to the old custom is ordered. 

A. E. BORIE, 

v retary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 94. 

March 11, 1869. 
All signs that have been put up in navy yards, indicating the Bureaus to which 
different departments belong, will be taken down. 

Simple signs — such as "Navigation Office" or store, " Ordnance Office" or store, 
"Steam Office" or stores, "Medical Office" or stores, "Clothing Office," "Office of 
Docks and Yards," &c, <fcc. — will be put up in their places. 

These offices are not branches of the Bureaus, but are departments of the yards, 
and are under the entire direction of the commandants. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretory of the Navy. 



70 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 95. 

Only commanding officers of squadrons, naval stations, and vessels, will be sainted 
by laying on or tossing oars. 

In all other cases junior officers will salute by touching the cap. 

All orders conflicting with the above are hereby revoked. 

Executive officers represent their commanding officers both on shore and afloat, 
and all orders that they give are supposed to be by their authority, and must be 
obeyed by every person under them. 

Executive officers on all occasions will take precedence over staff officers. 

All orders will go through them unless in cases where commanding officers make 
exceptions, which exceptions are not to conflict with the discipline of the service. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 96. 

March 11, 1869. 
Officers who have been acting in the capacity of fleet surgeons, fleet paymasters, 
or fleet engineers, and have during that time worn the uniform of a higher grade, 
will cease to wear that uniform when relieved from duty as fleet officers, and wiD 
wear the uniform of the grade to which they assimilate in rank. 
Commanding officers of stations will see this order enforced. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 97. 

March 11, 1869. 
Commandants of navy yards will send to the Department copies of all communi- 
cations from the differeut Bureaus relating to matters conflicting with their authority 
or taking from the executive officers any authority naturally devolving on them, or 
establishing any regulations for the yards which may take from the authority of the 
line officers of the Navy. 

A. E. BORIE. 

Secretary of the Navy. 



98. 

March 11, 1869. 

Orders or directions given by the different Bureaus will be communicated to the 
commandants of the different navy yards, who will see them executed. 

No such communications will be addressed to the officers in charge of navigation, 
ordnance, medical, clothing, or steam stores, or in charge of works under the Bureau 
of Yards and Docks. 

The commandant of a yard is the responsible person, who will communicate to the 
different Departments under him the requirements of the Bureaus. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Orders, No. 99. 

March 11, 1869. 

There seems to be some misconception on the part of commanders of squadrons in 
relation to the authority to be given to fleet officers. 

Commanders of squadrons will give those officers under their command the fol- 
lowing directions: 

Fleet officers will have no other authority than that conferred by the regulations 
of the Navy. The fact of their being fleet officers does not entitle them to any extra 
honors, and they are not to receive the honors paid to the commanders of vessels. 

No fleet officer will order any survey, detail officers of his corps for any service, or 
give any orders that will take them out of their ships, unless with the approbation 
of the commanding or executive officers. 

All honors hitherto paid to fleet surgeons, paymasters, and engineers, due only to 
commanders of vessels, such as laying on oars, &c, will be discontinued. 

No fleet captain, fleet surgeon, fleet paymaster, or fleet engineer, will go on board 
any vessel of a squadron to make an inspection or examination of any kind without 
Bpecial written orders from the commander of the squadron. 

Such orders, when issued by the Commander-in-Chief, must be presented to the 
commander of the vessel on board which the inspection is to take place. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 71 

General Orders, No. 100. 

March 11, 1869. 

The sea-pay of officers of the Navy will commence from the time of their leaving 
their domiciles to obey their orders. 

Officers ordered home from stations abroad will be entitled to sea-pay until they 
report to the Navy Department. 

Officers traveling outside the United States under orders will receive only their 
actual necessary expenses, to which they will certify on honor to the paymaster or 
pay agent. 

When sent on special or extraordinary service, where special expenses are in- 
curred, the Secretary of the Navy will decide the amount of compensation to be 
allowed. 

„ A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Orders, No. 101. 

March 11, 1869. 
The sentence of Captain Napoleon Collins, who was convicted by a Naval General 
Court-Martial of "negligence in the performance of his duty, whereby the U. S. S. 
Sacramento, under his command, was lost," is removed in consequence of the good 
conduct of Captain Collins during the war of the Rebellion. 

The pay of Captain Collins, forfeited by the above-Darned sentence, will be restored 
to him. 

A. E. BORIE, 

retary of (Ik Navy. 

General Orders, No. 102. 

March 11, 18G9. 

The sentence of a Naval General .Court-Martial in the case of Lieutenant-Com- 
mander George M. Bache, of the United Stales Navy, who was sentenced "to he sus- 
pended from duty, on the retired pay of his grade, roi the term of one year, and to 
be publicly reprimanded by the Honorable Secretary of the Navy," is hereby revoked, 
on the ground that there is nothing in the record of the proceedings of the Court- 
Martial to justify the sentence. 

So much of Lieutenant-Commander Bache's pay ;is was stopped by the sentence 
will he restored to him. 

A. E. BORIE, 

retary of tin Navy. 

General Orders, No. 103. 

March 12, 1869. 
Paragraph 2, Article IX, " Instructions to Medical Officers of the Navy," is hereby 
annulled. 
Surveys abroad will be ordered by the Commander-in-Chief of the squadron. 

A. E. BORIE, 

retary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 104. 

March 13, 1869. 
The sentence of a Naval General Court-Martial in the case of Second Assistant En- 
gineer George F. Sawyer, of the United states Navy, who was convicted October 5, 
1867, of "using language disrespectful to the President of the United states," and 
sentenced "to be suspended from rank and duty for the period of one year, and to be 
placed upon half of waiting orders' pay during that time, and to be publicly repri- 
manded by the Honorable Secretary of the Navy." is hereby revoked, there being 
insufficient evidence on the record to sustain the finding of the Court. 

So much of the pay as has been stopped against Second Assistant Engineer Sawyer, 
by the above sentence, will be restored to him. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 105. 

March 13, 1869. 
Hereafter the North and South Pacific Squadrons will not exist as separate organi- 
zations. 

The station will be called the Pacific Station and will extend from the northern- 
most point of the American possessions to Cape Horn. 

There will be two squadrons — the Northern and Southern Squadrons— each under 
command of a commodore and both under the general command of a Rear Admiral 
commanding the whole station. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



72 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 106. 

March 13, 1869. 
Communications in regard to matters coming under the cognizance of the different 
Bureaus should he sent to those Bureaus, and not to the Secretary of the Navy. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 107. 

March 15, 1869. 
All midshipmen, before being promoted to ensigns, will be examined at the Naval 
Academy before the Academic Board. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 108. 

March 15, 1869. 
The order giving rank to apothecaries in the Navy is hereby revoked. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 109. 

March 15, 1869. 
Hereafter all line officers below the grade of commander will be addressed either 
bv the title of their grade or as Mr. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 110. 

March 17, 1869. 
The attention of officers is called to the regulations of the Navy forbidding applica- 
tions for duty through persons of influence. All such applications must be made 
direct to the Secretary of the Navy, who is supposed to be the best judge of what duty 
an officer is entitled to, and if made in any other manner avLU not be attended to. . 
It is very apparent that an officer who can obtain service through influential friends 
must have a great advantage over all others, and the least deserving may get the 
most important duties. Duty will be assigned according to the requirements of the 
Navy, and those officers will be assigned to service who are known to be most com- 
petent to perform it. 

A. E. BORTE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 111. 

March 17, 1869. 

Officers of the Navy will inform the Department of their actual place of residence. 

The object is to ascertain where officers live, so that they may be assigned to duty 

at points nearest their places of residence, not only as a convenience to themselves, 

but also to save the Government their traveling expenses when ordered to distant 

points instead of those near home. 

The residence of each officer will be placed in a column of the Navy Register. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



March 17, 1869. 

The sea-service of officers hereafter will be for a period of three years, counting 
from the day they receive their orders until they are detached on the return of their 
ve'ssel to the United States. 

Commanding officers of squadrons will be careful not to detain vessels on a station 
longer than the period stated in this order, but must send them home in time to 
enable the officers and crew to reach their domiciles within the three years. 

Officers who have been three years at sea will, on their return, be allowed three 
years at a shore station. 

To make it fair for all, officers will have to take their turns on the different sta- 
tions. 

Those officers now on the Mediterranean station will not be ordered there again 
until they have performed duty on the coasts of Brazil, China, Pacific, and home 
squadrons, which will be the line of duty. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 73 

General Order, No. 113. 

March 18, 1869. 

The sentence of a Naval General Court-Martial in the case of Passed Assistant 
Surgeon H. P. Babcock, of the U. S. Navy, who was convicted, February 7, 1868, of 
"scandalous conduct, tending to the destruction of good morals," and "disrespect 
to his superiors," and sentenced "to be suspended from rank and duty for the term 
of two years, on the retired pay of his grade, and not to be promoted or advanced 
in his grade during the said term, and to be reprimanded by the Honorable Secretary 
of the Navy," is hereby revoked. 

The above charges were based upon a letter relating to the cruise of the late U. S. 
S. Sacramento, which was published in the "Army and Navy Journal," at New York, 
in the month of November, 1867. The letter was private: was not published as 
written; and there was no disrespect intended. 

So much of the pay as has been stopped against Passed Assistant Surgeon Babcock 
by the above sentence will be restored to him. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Orders, No. 114. 

March 22, 1869. 
The following order is issued because of frequent irregularities in the proceedings 
of Courts-Martial forwarded to this Department: 

1. The record of each and every case tried by Naval Court-Martial, whether gen- 
eral or summary, must have attached thereto the order convening the Court, or a 
copy of that order certified by the judge advocate or recorder, and also the original 
charges and specifications duly signed and approved. 

2. In summary as well as in general courts the charges ami specifications must be 
separate and distinct, the charge merely naming the offense ias. for example. Deser- 
tion), and the specification alleging the particulars of time, place, person, and cir- 
cumstance, in support of the charge, briefly, hut positively and clearly. 

3. The party accused may he tried al the same time for more than one offense, hut 
each offense must be separately charged, and each charge must he followed by a 
separate specification, so that the party accused maj be able to plead separately to 
each charge and specification. 

4. In all cases, whether genera] or summary, the record must state that the accused 
was furnished with a copy of the charges and specifications at least one day before 
the trial, and must also state thai the charges and specificat ions were read aloud in 
the presence and hearing of the accused before lie was called on m plead. 

5. In all trials, whether by summary or general courts, the accused must he called 
on to plead; and, if he fail to plead, the judge advocate oi recorder will note the 
fact, and the trial will go forward as if the accused bad pleaded not guilty. 

6. When the party accused pleads guilty to the whole matter charged and speci- 
fied, no evidence shall be introduced by the prosecution, except t«< rebut anj evi- 
dence ottered by the accused in mitigation of sentence. 

7. Witnesses for the prosecution shall be interrogated as follows. \ i/ : 

1st. By the judge advocate or recorder. 

2d. By the accused or his counsel. 
3d. By the Court. 
Witnesses for the defense shall lie examined — 
1st. By the accused or his counsel. 
2d. By the judge advocate or recorder. 
3d. By the Court. 



General Order, No. 115. 

March 22, L869-. 

To relieve commanders of squadrons and stations from the labor of signing, all 
papers to be forwarded to the different Departments will be endorsed by chiefs of 
staff or by secretaries. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 116. 

March 23, 1869. 
I. — At a Naval General Court-Martial convened February 3, 1869, on board the U. 
S. S. Pensacola, by order of Rear-Admiral T. T. Craven, commanding North Pacific 
Squadron, Henry Phillips, private marine, was tried upon the following charge and 
specifications: 



74 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



Charge. — "Disobedience of orders." 

Specification 1st — " In this: that the said Henry Phillips, private marine serving on 

board U. S. flag-ship Pensacola, on or about January twenty-eighth, one 

thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, being ordered" by Sergeant William 

Schact, of the same vessel, to scrub rammer and sponge handles, did refuse to 

obey the order." 

Specification 2d — "In this: that the said Henry Phillips, private marine, of the U. S. 

flag-ship Pensacola, on or about January twenty-eighth, one thousand eight 

hundred and sixty-nine, being ordered by Ensign F. Turnbull, officer of the 

deck, to scrub rammer and sponge handles, did refuse to obey the order." 

Of which charge and specifications he was found guilty, and sentenced as follows: 

"To be confined at the marine barracks, Mare Island, California, for the term of one 

year; to wear, during said confinement, a ball weighing eighteen pounds, attached 

by a chain five feet long to his leg; for the same period to be employed upon the 

government works at Mare Island, under the proper authority, during the regular 

working hours; and to suffer loss of all pay during said confinement, amounting to 

one hundred and ninety-two dollars ($192.00). " 

II. — At the same Court, Thomas : Neil, private marine, was tried upon the follow- 
ing charge and specification: 
Charge. — "Disobedience of orders." 

Specification — "In this: that the said Thomas O'Neil, private marine, being ordered 
by Sergeant William Schact to scrub the handles of the rammer and sponge 
belonging to gun No. 11, did refuse to obey the order, and did, furthermore, 
say, in the presence of Ensign F. Turnbull, officer of the deck, that he would 
obey no order of Sergeant Schact, or words to that effect. All this on board 
U. S. S. Pensacola, on or about January 28, one thousand eight hundred and 
sixty-nine, all the parties belonging to that vessel." 
Of which charge and specification he was found guilty, and sentenced as follows : 
"To be confined at the marine barracks, Mare Island, California, for the term of one 
year; to wear, during said confinement, a ball weighing eighteen pounds, attached by 
a chain five feet long to his leg ; for the same period to be employed upon the govern- 
ment works at Mare Island, under the proper authority, during the regular w r orking 
hours; and to suffer loss of all pay during said confinement, amounting to one hun- 
dred and ninety-two dollars ($192.00)." 

In both of these cases the proceedings are fatally defective, and are, therefore, dis- 
approved and set aside. The accused will be at once returned to duty. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 117. 

March 23, 1869. 
The strength of the marine guards for the several classes of vessels of the* Navy, 
when in commission for sea service, is hereby established as follows: 



Ratk ok Class. 



First rate, -when flag-ship __ 

First rate, not flag -ship 

Second rate, when flag-ship 
Second rate, not flag-ship __ 

Third rate 

Fourth rate 



■ 












./ 








! a 








to 


i * 

o 
-Jl 

! 
3 


o 
O 


S 
p 

u 

p 


£ 


> 


4 


1 


l 


40 


3 


4 


1 


l 


40 


3 


3 


1 


i 


35 


2 


2 


1 


l 


30 


2 


2 






20 


1 


2 






10 







When a vessel of the first rate is on independent service her marine guard will be 
of the same strength as if she were a flag-snip. 

A. E. BORIE, 



General Order, No. 118. 



Secretary of the Navy. 



March 27, 1869. 



At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the navy yard at New York, March 
11, 1869, Captain James H. Strong, of the Navy, was tried on the following charges 
and specifications : 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 75 

Charge I. — " Suffering a vessel of the Navy, through his negligence, to be stranded." 
Specification : a In this, that on or about the thirtieth day of May, eighteen hundred 
and sixty-eight, the said Captain James H. Strong, U. S. N., being then in com- 
mand of the U. S. S. Canandaigua, did permit an important change to be made 
in the course of the said vessel by the navigating officer, Lieutenant-Com- 
mander E.J. Dichman, without making due examination and inquiry, personally, 
as to the necessity or propriety of sueh change of course, whereby the said ves- 
sel was stranded near Brindisi, on the coast of Italy." 
Charge II. — -'Violating a regulation issued by the Secretary of the Navy." 
Specification : "In this, that during his command of the U. S. S. Canandaigua, from 
the first day of April, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, until on or about the 
thirteenth day of May, eighteen hundred and sixty-eight, the said Captain 
James H. Strong, U. S. N., did violate paragraph 624 of the Navy Regulations 
by not keeping a night order book." 
Charge III. — "Neglect of duty." 

Specification: "In this, that at the time and place set forth iu the preceding specifi- 
cations, the said Captain James H. Strong did neglect his duty in not requiring 
the lead to be hove while the U. S. S. Canandaigua was approaching land." 
Upon which charges and specifications the findings of the Court were as follows: 
"Of the specification of the first charge.' • Voi pro 

"Of the first charge," oi guilty. 1 ' 

"Of the specification of the second charge," " Notproven." 
"Of the second charge," Tot guilty." 

"Of the specification of the third charge," u Not proven." 
"Of the third charge," " Not guilty." 

"And the Court doth therefore honorably acquit the said Captain James H. Strong, 
U. S. N., of the charge- preferred against him." 

The proceedings and findings of the Court, in this ease, are approved. 

A. E. BORIE, 

retary of tin Navy. 



General Order, I\<>. 119. 

March 29, 1869. 
Genera] Order No. too is so far modified thai the sea-paj of officers will commence 
only when they report for duty on hoard a sea-going vessel, under the authority of 
the Department, which is in accordance with the law. 

When officers are ordered home in vessels which are not under the authority of the 
Government they can only receive other-duty pay. 
No traveling expenses can exceed ten cents ■■•. mile under any circumstances. 

\. E. BORIE, 

8^ cretary of the Natty. 



General Order, n<>. 120. 

April I, 1869. 
The Attorney Genera] having advised the Department that Congress alone can fix 

the relative rank of line and staff officers in the Navy, and the only officers whose 
relative rank has been thus legally established being those below mentioned, the 
order of March 3, L863, and the Navy Regulations, Article II. paragraphs six to 
twenty-eight (both inclusive), are hereby revoked and annulled. 

Surgeons of the fieet, paymasters of the fleet, and fleet engineers: and surgeons, 
paymasters, and chief engineers of more than twelve years, rank with commanders. 

Surgeons, paymasters, and ohief engineers of less than twelve years, and the sec- 
retary of the Admiral, and the secretary of the Vice-Admiral, rank with lieutenants. 

Passed assistant surgeons and first assistant engineers rank next after lieutenants. 

Assistant surgeons, assistant paymasters, and second assistant engineers rank 
next after masters. 

Third assistant engineers rank with midshipmen. 

The following is the letter from the Attorney General referred to above. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Seen ta'ry of the Navy. 

Attorney General's Office, 
Hon. A. E. Borie, March 29, 1869. 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Sir: I have carefully considered the question presented in your letter of the 26th 
Inst., touching the validity of the regulations adopted hy the Secretary of the Navy, 



76 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

with the approbation of the President of the United States, on the 13th of March, 
1863, establishing and increasing the relative rank of staff officers of the Navy. 

These regulations, I understand, are alterations or modifications of certain orders 
of the Secretary of the Navy dated August 31, 1846, May 27, 1847, and January 13, 
1857, upon relative rank — to which Congress, by the acts of August 15, 1854 (ch. 268, 
sec. 4), and March 3, 1859 (ch. 76, sec. 2), gave the force and effect of law. And the 
authority of the Secretary of the Navy, with the approval of the President, to alter 
or modify those orders and establish new and different regulations on the subject to 
which they relate was supposed to be derived from the provision of the fifth section 
of the act of July 11, 1862 (ch. 164), as follows: "That the orders, regulations, and 
instructions heretofore issued by the Secretary of the Navy be, and they are hereby, 
recognized as the Regulations of the Navy Department, subject, however, to such 
alterations as the Secretary of the Navy may adopt, with the approbation of the 
President of the United States."' 

The first question I Avill consider is whether, by the true construction and effect 
of this provision, the regulations of the Department establishing the relative rank 
of certain staff officers of the Navy, which were sanctioned and ratified by the acts 
of 1851 and 1859, are comprehended by the designation of "orders, regulations, and 
instructions heretofore issued by the Secretary of the Navy," and, as within that de- 
scription, subject to alteration at the will and pleasure of the Executive. 

The acts of 1854 and 1859, either in terms or in effect, gave to the orders of the 
Department to which they referred the force and efficiency of law. Until sanctioned 
and ratified by Congress, those orders were without authority and void as establish- 
ing rules and regulations upon a subject-matter which was exclusively of legislative 
cognizance. When so sanctioned and ratified, as they were by the statutes that 
have been mentioned, they were placed upon the footing of legislative acts, and 
were incorporated into the statute law on the subject of the Navy and its organiza- 
tion. 

Such being the character and effect given to the orders of the Department under 
consideration by the acts of 1854 and 1859, nothing less than a statute authorizing 
the President expressly, or by necessary intendment, to alter the provisions of those 
orders can be regarded as a sufficient warrant for the exercise of such power. The 
act of 1862 is not such a statute, as is clearly shown by the commissioners appointed 
to consolidate the laws in their remarks upon this subject. The orders sanctioned 
by the acts of 1854 and 1859 passed by the operation of those acts, as I have already 
intimated, into the form of law. They ceased to be orders or regulations of the Ex- 
ecutive, and became laws of Congress. No such general words of description as those 
employed in the act of 1862, "orders, regulations, and instructions heretofore issued 
by the Secretary of the Navy,"' can be fairly or properly treated as comprehending 
or embracing them. Besides, these orders, regulations, and instructions, mentioned 
in the 5th section of the act of 1862, are expressly recognized thereby u as the regula- 
tions of the Navy Department." The orders of the Secretary of the Navy, which were 
ratified by the acts of 1854 and 1859, had been previously recognized and established 
by that legislation as regulations of Congress on the subject of the relative rank of 
staff officers of the Navy. It cannot be supposed that Congress intended to change 
entirely the character which it had previously given to those orders, and remove 
them from the category of laws and place them in that of Executive regulations. 

In this view of the subject, the orders sanctioned by the statutes of 1854 and 1857 
are altogether without the purview of the 5th section of the act of 1862. But, con- 
ceding that, by the terms of that section, the entire body of "orders, regulations, 
and instructions" theretofore issued and promulgated by the Secretary of the Navy, 
including those which Avere within the scope of mere Executive authority, as well 
as those regulations that had the force and effect of law, as having been expressly 
sanctioned by Congress or previously sanctioned by legislative authority, were 
within the contemplation of Congress in enacting this statute, still I think that the 
provisions which, it is supposed, authorized the regulations of March 13, 1863, was 
only intended to recognize the power of the President to alter regulations which he 
was originally competent to adopt and promulgate without the express authority of 
Congress. No just rule of construction would authorize giving to this provision the 
force and effect of a general delegation of legislative authority to the Executive, at 
his pleasure to pass upon and regulate subjects which were, in their own nature, 
exclusively subjects of legislative cognizance and action, or which Congress had pre- 
viously fixed by law, and which the regulations thereby recognized had not under- 
taken to modify or alter. 

My opinion, therefore, is that the regulations of March 13, 1863, in so far as they 
are alterations of the orders of the Secretary of the Navy, to which Congress gave 
its legislative sanction by the acts of August 5, 1854, ch. 268, sec. 4, and March 3, 1859, 
ch. 76, sec. 2, are not founded upon valid authority of law. I thus dissent from the 
opinion of Mr. Attorney General Bates, by whose advice, it appears, these reguhv 
tions were adopted. (10 Opinions, p. 413.) I find, however, that the attention of 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 77 

this learned gentleman appears not to have been directed to the orders of 1846, 1847, 
and 1859, or to the effect of the two statutes which gave them the force and efficiency 
of law. The question of the proper construction of the act of 1862 was presented to 
him in an abstract form, before the adoption of the regulations of 1863, and without 
any suggestion which would naturally lead him to consider the character and effect 
of the previous orders on the subject of relative rank. It is not surprising, there- 
fore, that he should have come to a conclusion in regard to the effect of the act of 
1862 in which I am not able to express my concurrence. 
I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. R. HOAR, 

Attorney General. 



General Order, No. 121. 

April 6, 1869. 

Disbursing officers of the Navy, and others having in hand money under the con- 
trol of the Government, will in future comply with the following instructions relating 
to money deposits made in designated depositories: 

In all cases forward the original certificate of deposit to the Fourth Auditor imme- 
diately upon making the deposit, accompanied by full explanations as to the source 
from which the amount in question was received^ and why deposited. 

Transmit the duplicate to the Department, retaining the triplicate to file with ac- 
counts and to guard against losses. 

In cases where paymasters, acting as Navy agents, have received funds on requi- 
sitions for payment of particular bills which remain unpaid at the time of their relief, 
the funds so received will be transferred to their successors, and all other funds in 
their possession will be deposited to the credit of the Treasurer of the United States. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

April 9. 1869. 

Hereafter, paymasters are never to secure any passages for officers, unless ordered 
by the Department. 

Officers' traveling expenses will be paid according to General Order. No. 100. In 
case a passage should be secured it most be with the understanding that the passage 
is to be canceled should the order be revoked. 

Respectfullv, 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 122. 

April 26, 1869. 
The title of Fleet Captain is changed to that of Chief of Staff. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 123. 

April 27, 1869. 
Masters, ensigns, and midshipmen, after graduation will wear, in lieu of shoulder- 
straps or epaulets, gold-embroidered shoulder-loops, as per patterns. These can also 
be worn on the undress frock-coat, either on duty or on other occasions. Midship- 
men (after graduation) will wear on collar of full-dress coat a cord of the same pat- 
tern as that now worn on the jacket, and will dispense with the cord on the jacket. 
The full-dress sword belts of the different grades below the rank of commodore will 
be of blue webbing, with gold cord wovenin, as per patterns. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



78 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Circular Relative to Duties of Bureaus. 

May 15, 1869. 
Bureau of Ordnance. 

The duties of the Bureau of Ordnance shall comprise all that relates to magazines 
and to the manufacture and use of ordnance and ammunition, to the storing and 
preservation of the same, and to the mounting of ordnance on hoard vessels. 

It shall design the various shops and buildings at the navy yards where its work 
is executed so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same; hut the construction and repair- 
ing of these shops and huildings shall not he done hy the Bureau of Ordnance, nor 
shall the cost thereof he defrayed hy it. 

It shall design, erect, and maintain all the shops and huildings constructed for its 
purposes outside the limits of navy yards and for which it may have estimated; and 
it shall he charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all land and huildings in 
connection therewith, and with the preservation of the puhlic property under its 
control. It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, hlank 
hooks and forms, materials, means and appliances of every kind used in its shops, 
including fuel, and transport, erect, and repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the lahor, includ- 
ing clerks, writers and draughtsmen, masters, workmen, and laborers connected with 
it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall he 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will he given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. 

The duties of the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting shall comprise all that 
relates to the recruiting, discharging, and estimating for the pay of all seamen, ordi- 
nary seamen, landsmen, ^and boys, for the general and special service, and to the 
equipment of all vessels *in commission with rigging, sails, anchors, and cables, and 
yeoman's stores not provided by other bureaus; the furnishing of all vessels with 
fuel for all purposes, and to the transportation and mooring of vessels in ordinary at 
navy yards. 

It shall have under its sole control all rendezvous and receiving ships, and it shall 
provide transportation for all enlisted persons. 

It shall have under its sole control the ropewalks and the shops for making anchors 
and cables, rigging, sails, and cooking utensils. 

It shall design the various shops and buildings where its work is executed so far 
only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their completion, shall 
have exclusive control of the same ; but the constructing and repairing of these shops 
and buildings shall not be done by the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, nor 
shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, blank books 
and forms used in the equipping and recruiting department, materials, means and 
appliances of every kind used in its buildings and shops, and erect and repair the 
same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and preser- 
vation of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, in- 
cluding clerks, writers, messengers, masters, workmen, and laborers connected with 
it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to cany out its 
duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

Bureau of Navigation. 

The duties of the Bureau of Navigation shall comprise all that relates to the Naval 
Observatory, Nautical Almanac, and Hydrographic Office. 

It shall furnish navigation supplies and stores of all kinds, including charts, nauti- 
cal and navigating instruments and books, sailing directions and instructions, sta- 
tionery and blank books for commanding and navigating officers ashore and afloat, 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 79 

libraries, binnacles, flags, signal lights, running lights, and standing lights on board 
vessels, logs, leads, lines, and glasses, log books, illuminating oil, for all purposes 
except what is used in the engineer department of steamers. 

It will pay for the local pilotage of all vessels in commission; and it will estimate 
for the pay and transportation of the officers of the Navy. 

It shall have the sole control of the apartments assigned for its purposes, and for 
the use of the navigation officers in the yards and stations, and it will provide the 
instruments, clerks, writers, draughtsmen, messengers, and laborers for the same. 

It shall be charged with the collection of foreign surveys, publication of charts, 
sailing directions, and nautical works, and the dissemination of nautical and hydro- 
graphical information to the Navy and mercantile marine. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the stores, materials, instruments, means 
and appliances of every kind used for its purposes, and shall have under its sole con- 
trol their inspection, storing, and preservation. 

It shall design, erect, and maintain all the buildings at the Observatory and else- 
where, not within navy yards, that may be needed for its purposes: and it shall be 
charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all land and buildings in connection 
therewith. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, in- 
cluding clerks, writers, calculators and draughtsmen, master workmen, and laborers 
connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be addressed 
to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

Bureau of Tarda and Docks. 

The duties of the Bureau of Yards and Docks shall comprise all that relates to the 
construction and maintenance of all docks, slips, wharves, piers, quay walls, and 
buildings of all kinds, for whatever purpose needed, within the limits of the navy 
yards and of the Naval Asylum; but not of hospitals and magazines outside of those 
limits, nor of buildings for which it does not estimate. It shall prepare the plans 
and make the estimates for the above constructions, in consultation with the chief 
of the Bureau for whose use they are designed, as to their internal arrangements and 
location in the yard. It shall repair and furnish all buildings, stores, and offices in 
the several navy yards. 

It shall be charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all land and buildings 
connected with the navy yards. 

It shall have under its sole control the general administration of the navy yards, 
and shall provide all the water and gas for all the buildings, and for whatever other 
purposes they may be needed, and all the fuel, except what is to be furnished by the 
other Bureaus. 

It shall provide all landings, derricks, sheers, cranes, sewers, dredging, railway 
tracks, cars and wheels, trucks, grading, paving, walks, shade trees, enclosure walls 
and fences, ditching, reservoirs, cisterns, fire-engines and apparatus, and all things 
necessary, including labor for the cleaning of the yards, all watchmen, and the pro- 
tection of the public property. 

It shall furnish furniture, stationery, blank books and forms, also the clerical force, 
messengers, and laborers necessary for the commandant's office, and pay the expenses 
of the same. 

It shall furnish the oxen, horses, and hired teams required for all the purposes in 
and for the yard, the subsistence and care for the same, and the necessary teamsters. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, materials, means and 
appliances of every kind used for its purposes, and transport and erect them, and 
repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing writers and draughtsmen at the yards, masters, workmen, and laborers paid 
from its funds and connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 



80 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Bureau of Construction and Repair. 

The duties of the Bureau of Construction and Repair shall comprise all that relates 
to designing, building, fitting, and repairing the wood or iron hulls of vessels, the 
armor plating, turrets, spars, boats, tanks, ballast, casks, blocks, furniture for snips' 
use of the kind made in the navy yards, and lumber and tools for sea stores of the 
kind used by it in building vessels. 

It shall design the slips and the various buildings and shops where its work is 
executed so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same, including dry-docks; but the 
constructing and repairing of these buildings, slips, and docks shall not be done by 
the Bureau of Construction and Repair, nor shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, books and 
forms required in the constructor's department, materials, fuel, means and appliances 
of every kind used in its buildings and shops, and erect and repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, in- 
cluding clerks, writers, draughtsmen, and messengers at the yards and stations, 
masters, workmen, and laborers connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall have control of all vessels building and under repair, and also be respon- 
sible that vessels in ordinary do not go to decay for want of proper examination on 
the part of constructors in the yards. 

It will have charge of the docking of vessels. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

Bureau of Steam Engineering. 

The duties of the Bureau of Steam Engineering shall comprise all that relates to 
the designing, building, fitting out, repairing, and engineering of the steam machinery 
used in naval vessels. 

It shall design the various shops at the navy yards and stations where the work is 
executed so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same; but the construction and repair- 
ing of these shops shall not be done by the Bureau of Steam Engineering, nor shall 
the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the machinery, tools, stores, stationery, 
blank books and forms used in the engineer department, materials, means and appli- 
ances of every kind used in its shops, including fuel, and on board vessels excluding 
fuel, and erect and repair the same. 

It shall make all the contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, in- 
cluding writers, clerks, messengers, and draughtsmen at the yards and stations, 
masters, workmen, and laborers connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. 

The duties of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing shall comprise all that relates 
to supplying the Navy with provisions, clothing, small stores, water, and contingent 
stores in the paymaster's department. 

It shall design the various buildings and shops at the navy yards where its work 
is executed and its stores are kept so far only as their internal arrangements are con- 
cerned, and, after their completion, shall have exclusive control of the same; but the 
construction and repairing of these buildings and shops shall not be done by the 
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, nor shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, blank books 
and forms used in the pay and provisions department, materials, means and appli- 
ances of every kind used in its buildings and on board vessels; it shall furnish all 
the stores connected with the paymaster's department, including potable water for 
ships' use, other than that which is supplied by the distilling apparatus on board. 






GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 81 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, in- 
cluding clerks, writers, masters, workmen, and laborers connected with it and used 
entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, accounts, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties 
shall be addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 

The duties of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery shall comprise all that relates to 
laboratories, naval hospitals, and dispensaries. 

It shall furnish all the supplies, medicines, and instruments required in the medi- 
cal department of the Navy. 

It shall have the sole control of all buildings erected for its purposes. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the b1 bionery, blank books and 

forms used in the medical and hospital departments, materials, instruments, means 
and appliances of every kind used lor its purposes, and shall have under its sole con- 
trol their inspection, storing, transportation, and preparation. 

It shall design, erect, furnish, and maintain all the buildings constructed for its 
purposes outside the limits of the navy yards and for which it may have estimated. 
and it shall be charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all land and buildings 
in connection therewith, and with the preservation of the public property under its 
control. 

It shall design the various buildings erect* <1 within navy yards for its purpot 
far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their completion, 
shall have exclusive control of the same; but the construction and repairing of these 
buildings shall not be done by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, aor shall the 
cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall have under its sole control the pay, organization, and mustering of the 
labor of all kinds connected with it and used entirely for its purp 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

All reports, surveys, applications for discharge of invalids, pay-rolls, and commu- 
nications relating to its duties shall be addressed to ami received from it. 

It shall estimate for and pay from its own funds the cost bo carry out the 

duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of t he navy yards, who will he held responsible for their execution. 

A. E. BORIE, 

s,< r< tary of tin Navy. 



General Okdkk, No. 124. i 

May 15, 1869. 
The names of the following vessels are (hanged in accordance with law : 
"Algomar" to Benioia. "Pisoataqua" to Delaware. 

"Mosholu" to Severn. "Kewaydin" to Pennsylvania. 

'Anmonoosuc" to Iowa. "Pompanoosuo" to Connecticut. 

"Neshaminy" to Arizona. " Madawaska " to Tennessee. 

'• Canandaigua " to Detroit. ••Pushmataha*' to Cambridg 

"Omaha" to Astoria. ••Manitou"' to Worcester. 

"Contoocook" to Albany. "Wampanoag" to Florida. 

"Ontario*' to New York. "Minnetonka" to California. 

"Kenosha" to Plymouth. 

A. E. BORIE, 

tary of tin Navy. 



General Order, No. 125. 

May 15, 1869. 
Officers traveling under orders anywhere within the United States are allowed ten 
cents a mile by the nearest mail route, agreeably to the act of Congress of March 3, 
1835. 
Paymasters will be governed accordiuglv. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
6 



82 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 126. 

May 27, 1869. 

General Order, No. 90, on the subject of uniform, is so far modified that hereafter 
captains will wear four (4) strips of gold lace on the sleeve of the coat, each one-half 
inch wide. 

Commanders will wear three (3) scrips, each one-half inch wide. 

Staff officers, with assimilated rank of commander, will conform to the above order. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 127. 

June 9, 1869. 
In all first and second-rate vessels having first and second ward-rooms, until other- 
wise ordered, the following officers will mess in the second ward-room: 

Masters, ensigns, past assistant and assistant surgeons, passed assistant and assist- 
ant paymasters, first and second assistant engineers, professors of mathematics, 
French, Spanish, &c, and commodore's secretaries. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



June 11, 1869. 

Hereafter all vessels of the Navy will be fitted with full-sail power. The excep- 
tions to this will be the tugs and dispatch vessels not fitted with sails. 

Commanders of squadrons will direct that constant exercises shall take place with 
sails and spars. 

Where the vessels of a squadron can be kept together it is desirable that they should 
be exercised together, to create a spirit of emulation in the Navy. These exercises 
will be kept up when vessels are acting singly. 

Commanders of squadrons will require that all vessels are proficient in the follow- 
ing exercises : 

Sending up and down royal and top-gallant yards. 

Sending up and down top-gallant masts. 

Sending up and down top-gallant masts, lower yards, and topmasts at one time. 

Shifting topsail yards. 

Shifting jib-boom. 

Bending and unbending all sails. 

Furling sails from a bow line. 

Getting under way from single anchor with all sail set. 

Coming to single anchor and taking in all sail, together. 

Mooring and unmooring ship. 

Getting in and out all boats. 

Shifting topmasts. 

Shifting three topsails at one time. 

Shifting courses at one time. 

Reefing topsails and courses. 

A quarterly report will be made to the Department of all such exercises as may be 
performed, stating the time occupied in each evolution. 

When ships are lying in port, some portion of each day must be devoted to practice 
with yards and sails. 

When vessels are in port, either singly or in a squadron, top-gallant yards will be 
sent up and sails loosed when the flag is hoisted, and yards sent down at sunset, 
unless some extraordinary reason should prevent it. 

Commanders of squadrons are required to pay the closest attention to nautical 
maneuvers. Where it is possible to do so, they must form in squadron and go through 
such evolutions as are necessary for the management of a fleet. 

As the reports of these exercises will be published officially, it is to be hoped that 
special pains will be taken to introduce a system of efficiency and uniformity into 
the exercises of the United States Navy. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



The attention of officers convening summary courts-martial is called to the follow- 
ing extract from the act of Congress approved March 2, 1867: 

"Sec. 5. And he it further enacted, That the fourth section of the 'Act to provide a 
more efficient discipline for the Navy/ approved March 2, 1855, be, and hereby is, so 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 83 

amended that the authority therein given to the commander of any vessel in the Navy 
to convene summary courts-martial, shall require the approval of the proceedings hy 
the commander-in-chief, when present in port, and in his absence, that of the senior 
officer present, in all cases before carrying the sentence into execution; and in all 
cases where the sentence involves loss of pay, that part of such sentence shall be 
subject to the approval or disapproval of the Secretary of the Navy." 

These provisions of the law, now too often disregarded, must hereafter in all cases 
be complied with. 

Neither the officer who convenes a summary court, nor the commander-in-chief, 
nor the senior officer present, can either approve, disapprove, or remit that part of 
any sentence which involves loss of pay. This power belongs exclusively to the 
Secretary of the Navy. 

All sentences, therefore, which either in direct terms impose a forfeiture of pay, or 
which, by disrating the accused, " involves a loss of pay," must be referred, both by 
the officer who convenes the summary court and by the revising officer, by proper 
indorsement made and subscribed upon the record, to the Secretary of the Navy. 

Every record of proceedings of a summary court transmitted to this Department 
must show in express terms that, before the sentence was carried into execution, the 
proceedings were approved, first by the convening officer, and second "by the com- 
mander-in-chief, when present in port, or, in his absence, by the senior officer pre- 
sent." If neither commander-in-chief nor senior officer was present in port, that fact 
must be stated in the approval of the convening officer. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Juru 15, : 

The names of the- following iron-clad vessels are changi '1 : 

Agamenticus to Terror. Neosho to Vixen. 

Canonicns to Scylla. aconaway to Thunderer. 

Casco to Hero. Quinsigamund to Ht-reules. 

Catskill to Goliath. Sandusky to Minn \ i. 

Chickasaw to Samson. Sangamon to Jason. 

Chimo to Orion. Saugus to Centaur. 

Cohoes to Charybdis. Shackamaxou to Beola. 

Etlah to Hecate. Shawnee to Holus. 

Kalamazoo to Colossus. Shiloh to 

Kickapoo to Barpy. Squando to Erebns. 

Koka to Argos. Snnoook to Spitfire. 

Mahopac to Castor. Tippecanoe to Vesuvius. 

Manayunk to Ajax. Tonawanda to Amphitrite. 

Manhattan to Neptune. Tunxis to Hydra. 

Marietta to Circe. (Jmpqua to Fury. 

Modoe to Achilles. Wassuc to Stromboll. 

Nahant to Atlas. Waxsaw t<> Niobe. 

Nantucket to Medusa. Winnebago to Tornado. 

Napa to Nemesis. Yazoo to Tartar. 

Naubuc to Gorgon. Vuina to Tempest. 

Nauset to iEtna. 

A. E. BORIE, 

retaryoftheNavy. 

General Order, No. 131. 

June 18, 1869. 
It is very desirable that strict economy should prevail in the U. S. naval service 
with regard to the use of coal. This item is becoming a great expense to the Gov- 
ernment, and the Department considers that those vessels which are provided with 
full sail-power should not use their steam except under the most urgent circumstances. 
Commanders of fleets, squadrons, and of vessels, are therefore directed to do all 
their cruising under sail alone, which will not only have the effect to economize coal 
and save expense, but will also instruct the young officers of the Navy in the most 



important duties of their profession. 
The Department ha 



has ordered all the vessels of the Navy to be fitted with full sail- 
power, and squadrons will be supplied with them as fast as they can be fitted at the 
different yards. When this is accomplished, the Department can see no reason why 
our vessels cannot do all their cruising under sail; and officers who fail to economize 
in this respect will be closely questioned with regard to their reasons for such failure. 
It is not expected that the vessels now abroad, having no sail-power, can get along 
without the aid of steam, but sail must be used under all circumstances where it can 
be done to the greatest advantage. 



84 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Regulations, soon to lbe issued, will determine the number of times it will be desir- 
able to get up steam for the purpose of turning the engines. 

Commanders of fleets and squadrons will make a special report whenever steam is 
so raised, or, if it is not done, will state the reason why. They will also make a spe- 
cial report to the Department of any extraordinary occasion when steam has been 
raised on board the vessels under their command. 

They will state the number of hours 7 steaming from the time the fires were lighted 
until they were hauled, the number of tons of coal consumed and the distance run, 
state and direction of the wind, and what sail, if any, was set. 

Commanders are not to make dispatch an excuse for using coal except under the 
most urgent circumstances. 

They must not be surprised, if they fail to carry out the spirit of this order, if the 
coal consumed is charged to their account. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 132. 

June 18, 1869. 
No commanding officer will suspend an officer under his authority and restore him 
to duty again without a Court of Inquiry, the proceedings to be sent to the Depart- 
ment without delay. 

A. E. BORIE, 

Secretary of the Nary. 

Circular. 

July 17, 1869. 

The Navy Department being fully aware of the important part torpedoes will take 
in future naval warfare, it has determined to organize torpedo corps. 

This corps will consist of one head of torpedo corps and such officers as may be 
detailed from time to time for instruction and service. The corps will be under the 
direction of the Bureau of Ordnanee, so far as the material is concerned, and the di- 
rection of experiments. Torpedo stations will be established at Portsmouth, N. H., 
Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Norfolk, Pensacola, and Mare Island. Other sta- 
tions will be added as occasion may require. 

A suitable place will be selected where all officers entering upon this service will 
be sent for instructions and to witness experiments. After being properly instructed, 
.these officers, or as many of them as may be required, Avill be assigned to duty at the 
different naval stations under the inspectors of ordnance. 

They will have immediate charge of all torpedo apparatus, and be responsible for 
its condition and readiness for immediate use. 

They will carefully examine the channels of the harbors under their supervision, 
and select such places as will be best suited for obstruction torpedoes. 

Depots of torpedoes and material will be established at each of the principal 
stations under their charge. Torpedo boats will be fitted as soon as possible, and 
kept in readiness for use whenever they may be required. 

The use of the torpedo not being confined to defensive purposes, it is intended to 
make it one of the most efficient means of offense. 

The officers of the Navy are called upon to submit to the Bureau of Ordnanc.e any 
plans relating to the efficient working and use of torpedoes that may occur to them. 

The Department would suggest to the officers of the Navy wishing to prepare 
themselves for the torpedo service, that a knowledge of chemistry and of frictional 
and current electricity are very essential. 

Everything connected with the torpedo service of the Navy is to be considred by 
the officers of the Navy as strictly confidential. 

All officers not otherwise employed may, by application to the Department, be 
ordered to the experimental ground to witness experiments and receive such instruc- 
tions as they may require. 

G. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 133. 

July 20, 1869. 
It is ordered that officers of the Marine Corps serving on ship-board shall not be 
considered as in the enjoyment of the quarters to which they are entitled by law, 
and for the loss of which they are entitled to allowance. 

G. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 85 

General Order, No. 134. 

July 27, 1869. 
In all cases where contractors provide articles of an inferior quality to those called 
for by the contract, and at a time when expedition is required, or fail to provide the 
articles at the time stated in the contract, the commandant will order the purchasing 
paymaster to go into market and purchase the articles on the best terms for the Gov- 
ernment, the difference in price to be charged to the contractor. 

G. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 135. 

July 29, 1869. 
In order to enable commanding officers of squadrons to cany out General Order, 
No. 128, commandants of navy yards will give their particular attention to the rig- 
ging of vessels, and see that all the appliances for ridding top-masts and top-gallant 
masts and sending down the same are properly adapted to the purpose intended; 
that the purchases are all properly led, and the blocks suitable; that the masts do 
not bind in the caps or cross-trees. Inventions for facilitating the housing and send- 
ing down of masts and yards will be examined and encouraged, and when of a 
proper kind Avill be adopted; of course, always guarding against interference with 
any patent-right. 

G.M.ROBESON, 

Secretary of th< Navy. 



General Order, No. 136. 

August 1", 1869. 
The names of the following vessels are changed by authority of law: 

Arizona to Nevada. Goliath to Katskill. 

Hecla to Nebraska. Gorgon to Minnetonka. 

Hercules to Oregon. Harpy to Klamath. 

Thunderer to Massachusetts. Hecate to Etlah. 

Astoria, to Omaha. Hydra to 

Cambridge to Congress. Medusa to Nantucl 

Detroit to Canandaigua. Minerva to Sandusky. 

Achilles to Modoc. Nemesis to Napa. 

. JEtna to Nausett. Neptune to Manhattan. 

Argos to Koka. Orion t«> Piscataqua. 

Atlas to Nahant. Samson to Chickasaw. 

Castor to Mahopac. Soylla i<> Canonicnsf. 

Centaur to Saugus. Spitfire to Snncook. 

Charybdis to Cohoes. Stromboli to Wassuc. 

Circe to Marietta. Tartar to frhZOO. 

Cyclops to Kewaydin. Tempest to Yuma. 

Bolus to Shawnee. Vesuvius to Wyandotte. 

Erehus to Algoma. Vixen t<> Osceola. 

Fury to Umpqua. Tornado to Winnebago. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

retary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 137. 

September 7. 1869. 
I. At a Naval General Court-Martial, which was convened at Philadelphia, Pa., 
July lo. 1869, by an older of the Secretary of the Navy, dated duly 9, 1869, and of 
•which Commodore John 11. Goldshorough, l'. S. N.. was president, was arraigned — 
Passed Assistant Paymaster Charles I>. Mansfield U. S. N., on the following 
charges and specifications, viz: 
Charge I.—" Drunkenness." 

Specification — "In this: that Charles l>. Mansfield, being then and now a passed as- 
sistant paymaster in the United States Navy, and being then attached to the 
United States steamer Mohongo, as paymaster, did, on board said Mohongo, 
in Pichilinque Bay, Lower California, on or about the-ninth day of May, 1869, 
become drunk." 
Charge II.— "Writing a threatening letter to Commander Stephen B. Luce.U. S.N." 
Specification — "In this: that said Charles P. Mansfield, passed assistant paymaster as 
aforesaid, being then in the naval service of the United States, did. on or 
about the sixth day of June, 1869, at San Francisco, California, write and 
transmit to Commander Stephen B. Luce, then in the United States Navy, a 
threatening letter containing the words and figures following, viz: 



86 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

" Occidental Hotel, San Francisco, 

"JuneQ, 1869. 

****** 

"I regret your action, for should it work auy greater injury to me than having me 
relieved from this squadron, I shall be compelled, in self-defence, and in no vindic- 
tive spirit, to report the events occurring in the history of the cruise of the Mohongo 
while under your command, the facts and figures of which, with written testimony, 
are in my possession. 

"It would be a great favor to me, and I think would be to the interest of both of 
us, if you would, and it should be in your power, withdraw your report. 
"Yours truly, 

"CD. MANSFIELD, 

"P. A. Paymaster, U. S. N. 
"Commander S. B. Luce, 

"Annapolis, Hd." 

To the first charge and specification the accused pleaded, in bar of trial, that he 
had, by punishment, already expiated the offense therein set forth. 

The Court, upon evidence, sustained this plea, and did not hold the accused to 
trial on the first charge and specification. 

To the second charge and specification the accused, in bar of trial, pleaded several 
matters of law ; but this plea was overruled by the Court, and he thereupon pleaded 
"Not Guilty" to said charge and specification; upon which plea he was tried and 
found guilty, and sentenced "to be publicly reprimanded in a general order by the 
Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

II. The proceedings, decisions, finding, and sentence of the Court are approved, 
and this general order is issued as a public reprimand of Past Assistant Paymaster 
Charles D. Mansfield, U. S. N., in execution of said sentence. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 138. 

September 11, 1869. 

The regulations are so far modified that, when a foreign vessel-of-war in amity 
with us shall arrive in a port of the United States where there is a vessel of the 
Navy, the commanding officer shall, without delay, send a proper officer on board to 
offer the usual civilities and any assistance in his power. If the foreign vessel bears 
a flag of an admiral or commodore commanding a squadron, and salutes the flag of 
the United States, the salute will be promptly returned, and the commanding officer 
of the vessel will call upon the admiral or commodore and salute them in case they 
return his call. 

The same rule will be observed when commanders of foreign squadrons visit a 
navy yard or station. In all cases when the flag of the nation to be saluted is afloat, 
it will be hoisted at the fore-royal mast-head, and the jib hoisted at the first and 
hauled down at the last gun. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 139. 

September 13, 1869. 
Port Admirals are particularly enjoined, in the inspection of vessels fitted for sea, 
to see that the clothing of the crew is examined, to ascertain that it conforms, in 
all respects, to the regulations of the Navy. 

The inspecting officers will make special report in regard to this matter, and will 
state who were the paymasters furnishing the clothing; whether the clothing is 
made according to contract ; whether it is of inferior quality ; when it was procured, 
and everything in relation to it. 

Inspecting officers will also state if there is any neglect on the part of officers, 
and whether they knowingly furnished inferior articles instead of those called for 
by regulations. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 140. 

September 17, 1869. 

I. At a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the Washington navy yard, August 
10, 1869, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, dated July 26, 1869, of which Court 
Captain H. K. Davenport, U. S. N., was president, was tried — 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 87 

Past Assistant Surgeon Charles L. Green, V. S. N., upon the following charges and 
specifications : 

Charge I. — "Treating with contempt a superior officer while in the execution of his 
office. 

Specification — In this: that on or about the first day of February, 1869, on board the 
U. S. ship Nipsic, in the harbor of Aspinwall, United States of Colombia, the 
said Passed Assistant Surgeon Green, having been ordered by his commanding 
officer, Lieutenant-Commander Thomas 0. Selfridge, to take John Simmons, 
ordinary seaman, off the sick list, did dissent from the said order, and, the 
order having been repeated to him, did make no reply, and did show a con- 
temptuous indifference to the authority of his commanding officer. 

Charge II. — "Disobeying a lawful order of his superior officer." 

Specification — In this: that at the time and place set forth in the specification of the 
first of these charges, the said Passed Assistant Surgeon Charles L. Green, hav- 
ing been ordered by his commanding officer, Lieutenant ( lommander Thomas O. 
Self ridge, to take John Simmons, ordinary seaman, off the sick list, did posi- 
tively refuse to obey the said order, saying he did not consider it a legal order. 

Charge III. — "Conduct unbecoming an officer." 

Specification — In this: that on or about the fourth day of March. 1869, at the town 

of Aspinwall, United States of Colombia, the said i sistant Surgeon 

Charles J.. Green was intoxicated, or under the influence of intoxicating liquors. 

and did so exhibit himself, and behave in a manner unbecoming an officer, in 

a place of public resort in the said town. 
To each of these charges and specifications the accused pleaded "Not guilty." 

Finding. 
The ( lourt, "after full and mature deliberation," found •• the said Charles I.. G 

Passed Assistant Surgeon l". 8. N.," the accused, as follows: 

Of specification of the 1st charge, "Proven." 
Of charge 1st, "Guilty." 

Of specification of the 2d charge, "Proven." 
Of charge 2d, Guilty. ' 

Of specification of the 3d charge, "Not proven." 
Of charge 3d, "Not guilty." 

Si NTEN < i . 

The Court thereupon sentenced the accused a> follows: 

"To be suspended from rank, on furlough pay", for the term of two years, and to 
be publicly reprimanded by the Honorable secretary of the N;.\y: the order repri- 
manding him to be read to the officers and men <>f each naval station and vessel in 
commission.' - 

II. On examination of the evidence in this case, it appears — 

That on the morning of February 1. 1869, the accused, Passed ^ssistaDt Surgeon 
Charles L. Green, was ordered by Lieutenant Commander T. < >. Selfridge, the com- 
manding officer of the U.S.S. Nipsic, to which the accused was attached, to take off of 

the binnacle list the name of John Simmons, an ordinary seaman of said ship, who, 
by reason of the continuance of his name on said list, was entirely excused from duty. 
The crew of the ship being small, her working had been seriously crippled by reason 
of the number of men on the sick list, and the seaman referred to was. by the admis- 
sion of the accused, able to do light duty. 

On receiving this positive oider. the accused retired without refusing to obey, 
and the commanding officer rested, during the day, under the impression that it had 
been complied with. In the afternoon of the same day. however, finding that this 
was not the case, he sent for the accused to the shore, whither he had gone without 
obeying the order previously given him, and. on his arrival, the commanding officer 
explicitly repeated the order. The accused refused to obey, and persisted in his re- 
fusal; then, for the first time, alleging as a reason, that he could not conscientiously 
obey said order. He was thereupon ordered to consider himself under arrest, and 
the original order was given to, and obeyed by, another officer. 

On this state of facts, for not obeying, and for refusing to obey, said order, the 
Court found the accused '-guilty of treating with contempt his superior officer whilst 
in the execution of his office," and " of disobeying a lawful order of his superior offi- 
cer," and sentenced him as above recited. 

The finding of the Court is approved. ( Obedience to the orders of superior authority 
is the first and plainest duty of all officers, from which no one. of any class, is, or 
can be, exempted. 



88 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Authority cannot, of course, control the mind, nor require a false expression of 
either personal or professional opinion, and disobedience may be sometimes excused 
by the manifest illegality, enormity, or folly, which would result directly from the 
execution of an order; but the general rule of obedience is qualified only to this ex- 
tent, and cannot, with safety, be relaxed beyond it. 

In this case, the accused, Passed Assistant Surgeon Green, was directed, not to 
declare any false opinion, nor to inflict on any individual any act of false practice 
in his profession, but merely to take the name off of a list made by him and. under 
his immediate supervision ; to do, by order of his commanding officer, a specific affirm- 
ative act, the only result of Avhich was clearly within the authority of the officer 
giviug the order. For that result the accused had no responsibility. 

To report the condition of the crew is the duty of the medical officer, but the ex- 
cusing, on his report, is, in truth, an executive act, to be done or omitted by the au- 
thority and on the responsibility of the commander. 

The accused retained his right to remonstrate ; to continue his treatment and record 
of the case; to enter his respectful protest on his journal; to report to the Depart- 
ment, and to prefer charges for unnecessary hardship and wrong; but it remained 
with the responsible commander, alone, to determine what duty, what exposure of 
life, if need be, the interests or exigency of the service required from each of the offi- 
cers and crew of his ship. No class of officers are solely responsible for the safety 
and well-being of a ship's company. To each are assigned professional duties with 
appropriate responsibilities. But as no officer would be justified in refusing, in time 
of danger, to execute an order involving unreserved exposure of life, so none are au- 
thorized, at any time, to interpose their judgment between the exigencies of the serv- 
ice and the responsibility of the commanding officer. He is intrusted with the pur- 
poses and orders of the government; to his care and command are committed, under 
strict accountability, the ship and her company, and he is responsible for the accom- 
plishment of the purposes for which she is commissioned, her safety in danger, and 
efficiency in presence of an enemy. 

The sentence of the Court is not unsuited to the offense of which the accused was 
found guilty. 

Disobedience of orders is, under any circumstances, a serious offense, and when 
committed deliberately, by an intelligent officer, under a claim of right, must tend 
greatly to the subversion of all discipline. 

I am inclined to think, however, from the evidence, that the disobedience complained 
of in this case was the result of mistake of judgment in regard to professional rights 
and duties, rather than a deliberate intention of wrong. Mistakes of this kind rarely 
require a severe, and never a disgraceful, punishment; and the previous good char- 
acter and conduct of Mr. Green entitle him to the benefit of whatever doubt there 
may be on this subject, and to the consideration of the reviewing authority. 

The sentence of "suspension from rank on furlough pay for the term of two years" 
is therefore remitted, and this order is published as the "reprimand" provided for 
in the sentence, and it will be read accordingly. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 141. 

September 30, 1869. 
It is not necessary to send a half-monthly pay-roll from the navy yards to the Bu- 
reaus. Monthly rolls only are required. 

The amount paid half-monthly can be checked against the men, 

Under these circumstances no extra writers will be required or allowed. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 142. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the navy yard at Pensacola, Fla., 
August 2, 1869, Captain Frank Munroe, of the Marine Corps, was tried on the follow- 
ing charges: 

Charge I. — Scandalous conduct to the prejudice of good order and discipline 
Charge II. — Habitual intemperance. 

Charge III. — Subjecting private marines of his command to unlawful and cruel 
punishment. 

Of each of which charges the accused was found guilty, and was sentenced by the 
Court "to be dismissed from the Marine Corps of the United States." 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 89 

Ami at the same Court-Martial (with the change of one member), the said Captain 
Munroe was tried on the following charge: 
CHARGE. — Conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman. 

Of which charge lie was found guilty, and sentenced "to be dismissed from the 
Marine Corps of the United jStates." 

The findings and sentences of the Court in the case of Captain Munroe are approved. 
Upon a careful review, however, of the facts developed by the testimony in relation 
to the several charges, the misconduct of the accused, though fully warranting the 
judgment of the Court, w r hose province was not to exercise lenity, does not appear to 
have been so aggravated as might be supposed from the nature of the charges. Pre- 
vious to these trials Captain Munroe has borne a fair character, as far as appears on 
the records of the Department, and served with credit and distinction during the 
late war, ami it is not desirable that an officer should be expelled in disgrace from 
the service, and no opportunity afforded him for retrieving his reputation. 

For these reasons the punishment awarded by the Court is mitigated to suspension 
from command, duty, and rank for the term of three years; and Captain Munroe will 
be considered as so suspended from this date. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy, 



General Order, No. 143. 

October 28, 1869. 

I. Before a General Court-Martial convened at New York, by order of the Secre- 
tary of the Navy, dated July 31, 1869, of which Court Commodore A. M. Pennock, 
U. S. N., was president, was arraigned and tried JR. D. Bogart, paymaster's clerk, 
upon the following charges and specifications: 

Charge I. — "Stealing money of the United States." 

Specification — " In this: that on or about the first day of December, 1868, R. D. Bogart y 
while serving as paymaster's clerk on board the U. S. receiving ship Vermont, 
then lying at, or near, the New York navy yard, did steal, from the safe in the 
paymaster's office of said vessel, a sum of money, amounting to $10,000, or 
thereabouts, belonging to the United States, furnished for use in the naval 
service thereof, thereby violating the act of Congress approved March 2, 1863, 
entitled ' An Act to prevent and punish frauds upon the Government of the 
United States.'" 

Charge II.— "Fraud." 

Specification — "In this: that the said JR. D. Bogart, whilst employed as paymaster's 
clerk on board the U. S. receiving ship Vermont, lying at, or near, the navy 
yard, New York, did, during the year 1868, at various times, make false en- 
tries on the books of the paymaster of said vessel, thereby defrauding the 
United States." 

Charge III. — "Desertion." 

Specification — "In this: that on or about the first day of December, 1868, the said 
B. D. Bogart, whilst employed as paymaster's clerk on board the U. S. receiv- 
ing ship Vermont, at New York, did desert from said vessel, and from the 
navy yard, and did not return again until brought on board by a guard of 
marines, on the 26th day of July, 1869." 
To these charges and specifications, the accused pleaded "Not Guilty." 

Finding. 

The Court, upon full examination of the testimony and due consideration of the 
defense, find as follows : 

"That the specification of the first charge is proved, except the amount of ten 
thousand dollars, a less amount proved:" that the accused is guilty of the first 
charge. 

That the specification of the second charge is proved: that the accused is guilty 
of the second charge. 

That the specification of the third charge is proved: that the accused is guilty of 
the third charge. 

Sentence. 

"To be confined for three years in such penitentiary, or prison, as the Hon. 
Secretary of the Navy may designate, and at the expiration of said confinement, to 
forfeit all pay and emoluments now due him, or that may hereafter become due him, 
and to be dishonorably discharged from the naval service of the United States." 

II. The Secretary of the Navy, after much consideration, feels compelled to disap- 
prove and set aside the proceedings, findings, and sentence in this case. 



90 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

R. D. Bogart, the accused, ceased to be paymaster's clerk December 10, 1868, by 
the acceptance of his resignation, and the appointment and qualification of his suc- 
cessor, more than six months before these proceedings were instituted. Unless, 
therefore, there be some act of Congress applicable to his case, which prolonged his 
liability to military courts for military offenses after he had been allowed to leave 
the service, he was not subject to trial by naval court-martial on charges preferred 
after that date. 

Unfortunately there is no such law applicable to the second and third charges. 
For "Desertion" therefore, he was not triable by this Court, nor was he so triable 
for " Fraud' 7 as such, per se, and apart from any of that class of offenses which in- 
clude it. And even if the crime of fraud had been an offense embraced by the pro- 
visions of any act of Congress, no prisoner could be held under a charge and speci- 
fication so vague and uncertain as those made in this case. 

For the offense of stealing money belonging to the United States, Bogart remained 
liable to be tried by court-martial, under the Act of Congress above referred to; for 
that act continues liability for this crime beyond the term of service. 

Unfortunately, however, the evidence in the case fails utterly to establish the 
offense charged, which is "theft." It tends to prove the other, and quite distinct 
offense, of embezzlement. Upon that proof the conviction was wrong, because illegal. 
The offenses of theft and embezzlement are quite distinct in law, and the act of Con- 
gress above referred to enumerates them separately as different offenses; and to hold 
Bogart guilty of theft because found guilty of embezzlement, would be to disregard 
general rules of law established for the furtherance of justice, and binding upon 
all courts and revising authorities. 

The Secretary of the Navy comes to these conclusions very reluctantly, compelled 
by the conviction that the safety of judicial proceedings is to be found only in the 
strict application of general rules ; and that he is not authorized to substitute his 
individual will in those cases where these rules fail by reason of their generality. 

The proceedings against Bogart must, therefore, be set aside, and he must be re- 
delivered into the custody of the United States Marshal from whom he was received 
July 26, 1869. Bear- Admiral S. AY. Godon, commanding the New York navy yard, 
will cause him to be redelivered accordingly. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 144. 

November 1, 1869. 

Hereafter, when vessels are to be put out of commission, they are to be dismantled, 
their stores, including coal, provisions, equipment, &c, landed and turned oyer to 
the proper officers, their chains hauled up and ranged on deck; the engine and all 
its appurtenances cleaned and left in as good order as is practicable, the holds, bilges, 
store-rooms, and apartments cleaned out, and the holds and bilges whitewashed by 
their own people before the crew is transferred. 

Officers are not to receive their detatchments until after the stores, &c, which have 
been in their charge, have been surveyed and their condition and amount satisfacto- 
rily accounted for. 

In cases where Boards of Survey attribute the ill-condition of equipments or 
stores, particularly of ground-tackle, rigging, sails, boats, or provisions, to the fault 
of the officer in charge of them, the commandant of the yard will investigate the 
matter, and make up his report of the case, together with his recommendation in 
relation to it, to be forwarded to the proper Bureau for reference to the Department. 

The commanding officer will be the last to receive his detachment from the vessel. 



Secretary of the Navy. 
General Order, No. 145. 



December ' p 
I. Before a Naval General Court-Martial which convened at the navy yard at 

Portsmouth, NT. H., November 15, 1869, Private George Bracken, of the Marine Corps, 

was tried on the following charges: 

Charge I. — " Disobedience of orders." 

Specification — "In this: that George Bracken, a private duly enlisted and serving in 
the United States Marine Corps, on or about the 28th day of October, 1869, 
at the marine barracks in the navy yard at Kittery, Maine, being confined in 
one of the cells in said barracks, and being ordered, by Sergeant Edward P. 
Keating, his superior officer, to proceed to another cell in said barracks, did 
refuse to obey, and did disobey, said lawful order." 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 91 

Charge II. — ll Conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline." 
Specification — --hi this: that said George Bracken, at the time and place set forth in 
the preceding specification, did assault, and with an earthen bowl strike, and 
seriously wound his superior officer, the said Sergeant Edward P. Keating, 
who was then acting in the performance of his duty, thereby cutting and 
severely wounding his face and head, and, at the same time, attempting to 
disarm said sergeant." 
To which charges and specifications the accused, Private George Bracken, of the 
Marine Corps, pleaded "Not Guilty.' 7 

Finding. 
The Court, having maturely considered the evidence adduced, finds the accused, 
Private George Bracken, of the Marine Corps, as follows: 
Of the Specification of Charge 1st, "Proven." 
Of Charge 1st, " Guilty." 

Of the Specification of Charge 2d, "Proven." 
Of Charge* 2d, " Guilty." 

Sentence. 
And the Court does therefore sentence him, Private George Bracken, of the Marine 
Corps, "To confinement at hard labor in such prison or penitentiary as the Secretary 
of the Navy may designate, for the term of two years ; that he be dishonorably dis- 
charged from the service at the end of his imprisonment, and that this finding and 
sentence be read at all marine barracks, and on all vessels in commission." 

II. The proceedings, findings, and sentence of the Court in the foregoing case are 
approved. 

III. The penitentiary at Wethersfield, Connecticut, is designated as the place of 
confinement, where the prisoner will be sent for the execution of so much of his sen- 
tence as relates to confinement. 

IV. Commodore John A. Winslow, U. S. N., the commandant of the navy yard at 
Portsmouth, N. H., is charged with the execution of this order. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular Letter. 

December 22, 1869. 
The Navy Department and Bureaus will be closed on Christmas and New Year's days. 
During the intervening week the office hours will be from 9 a. m. to 12 in., and 
only one-half of the number of clerks will be required to be present at those hours. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 116. 

January 1, 1870. 

Disbursing officers of the Navy will, in future, comply with the following instruc- 
tions : 

1st. In addition to the returns now required by the Department, its Bureaus, and 
the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, paymasters must, from the date of this order, 
transmit to the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, as soon as the same are executed, 
duplicates, or certified copies of monthly money statements and accounts of sales of 
bills of exchange and public property, and of all receipts of money from other pay- 
masters, and from every other source. 

They must also transmit, with their regular quarterly returns to the same Bureau, 
but in a separate inclosure, duplicates, or certified copies of Quarterly Accounts Cur- 
rent, and Abstracts of Open Purchases, and a statement showing the balance "due 
and unpaid," or "overpaid," on the account of each officer, seaman, and marine borne 
upon the pay-rolls for the quarter for which the above-mentioned returns are ren- 
dered. 

2d. The Department requires that all public bills be in triplicate, and marked res- 
pectively, "original," "duplicate," and "triplicate," and that they show, on their 
faces and indorsements, the appropriations from which paid, and the respective 
office or Bureau having cognizance of the same. 

Of the public bills paid by paymasters of sea-going vessels, whose money accounts 
are settled at the end of a cruise, the triplicates are intended for use, and to be filed 
at such office or Bureau, to which, arranged in separate packages, and accompanied 
by special abstracts and letters of advice, they must be forwarded quarterly. The 
duplicates, accompanied by a general abstract, and arranged in the order of their 
numbers, must also be forwarded quarterly, with the other returns for the Fourth 
Auditor of the Treasury. The originals must be forwarded at the end of a cruise 
with the final returns for the Fourth Auditor. 



92 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. * 

Of the public bills paid by paymasters of stations and receiving ships, purchasing 
paymasters, and all other paymasters, whose money accounts are settled quarterly, 
the triplicates, except in cases where the bills, or copies of the same, have previously 
been submitted, or forwarded to the respective office or Bureau, must be arranged, 
and forwarded in the same manner as above directed in the case of triplicates of 
bills paid by paymasters of sea-going vessels. The duplicates must be filed for ref- 
erence in the office of the paymaster who has paid the bills. The originals must be 
forwarded quarterly for final settlement with the other returns for the Fourth Aud- 
itor. 

3d. In all cases the exterior of a package must show the nature of its contents 
and for whom it is intended. As the sole object sought in requiring returns to be 
forwarded through commanding and fleet officers is that they may know that pay- 
masters render the same with the promptness prescribed by regulation, all packages 
must be sealed by the paymaster forwarding them, and must not be opened during 
transmission. All letters of advice must be forwarded unsealed. 

4th. In forwarding any, or all, of the above-mentioned returns, or packages (ex- 
cept duplicates or certified copies of monthly money statements and accounts of 
sales of bills of exchange and public prop'erty, and of all receipts of money from 
other paymasters, and from every other source, which, as above stated, must be 
forwarded to the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing as soon as executed), they, to- 
gether with all other quarterly or final returns, must be inclosed in one package 

and prominently marked " Quarterly (or final) Eeturns U. S. , Paymaster ," 

and forwarded to the Secretary of the Navy, through the channels prescribed by 
regulation. 

5th. Paymasters having balances of money on hand under any appropriation from 
which they have made no payment for a period not exceeding three months, must, 
whenever an authorized public depository is accessible, deposit the same to the credit 
of the Treasurer of the United States, and without delay forward certificates of de- 
posit to the Department, or to the Bureau having cognizance of said appropriation, 
and to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury. 

6th. Paymasters must state upon their accounts-current the appropriations to 
which their several receipts and expenditures of money belong. 

Commanding officers of stations and vessels must acknowledge the receipt of this 
general order, transmit copies of the same to the paymasters under their respective 
commands, and be responsible for its enforcement. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 147. 

January 24, 1870. 

In the event of the death of a paymaster on duty, or of his being pronounced by 
competent medical authority to be deranged or disabled in mind or body to such an 
extent as to seriously incapacitate him for the performance of his duties, the com- 
manding officer of the vessel or station to which he has been or is attached shall 
immediately take possession of the keys of the safe and store-rooms of such pay- 
master, and report all the facts in the case to the senior officer present, which latter 
officer shall, without delay, direct a board of officers to take an inventory of the 
money and stores then on hand; and shall appoint a suitable person to take charge 
of the same, and to perform the duties of such paymaster until otherwise directed 
by competent authority. The senior officer present shall also appoint another suit- 
able person to complete the vouchers, transfer the accounts, close up the books, and 
to have the custody of the same, and of all papers necessary to the complete settle- 
ment of the accounts of such paymaster, and to be responsible for their proper trans- 
mission to the Department. Both the above-named appointees shall be present when 
the above inventories are taken, and shall be furnished with copies thereof, which 
copies, duly certified, shall be considered satisfactory vouchers for the money and 
stores thus ascertained to be on hand. 

If such paymaster, while of sound mind, shall have nominated, in writing, the 
person to be selected to have custody of the books, vouchers, and other papers, and 
to complete the accounts as above mentioned, the senior officer present shall, unless 
manifestly contrary to the public interest, conform to such nomination, and shall 
inform the Department, without delay, of his entire action in the matter. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 148. 

December 31, 1869. 
I. At a Naval General Court-Martial convened atthe Boston navy yard, September 
23, 1869, pursuant to an order of this Department dated September 15, 1869, and of 
which Rear-Admiral H. K. Thatcher, U. S. N., was president, was arraigned and 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 93 

tried Lieutenant-Commander Hairy B. Seely, V. S. N., who was found guilty of the 
following charges and specifications: 
Charge I. — "Neglect of duty." 

Specification 1st — "In this: thai Lieutenant-Commander Henry B.JBeely, U. S. N., 
being at the time executive officer of, and serving in that capacity on board, 
the U. S. S. Pawnee, did neglect his duty by allowing James L. Oliver, master- 
at-arms of said vessel, to inflict unlawful and cruel punishments and tortures 
upon the persons of R. W. Turner and John A. Symms, landsmen, serving on 
board said vessel: said punishment and tortures extending from on or about 
the 20th day of June, 18(39, to on or about the 30th day of June, 1869, said ves- 
sel being, from the 20th to the 26th day of said June, on the passage from Bra- 
zil to the United States, and from the 26th to the 30th day of said June, at or 
near New York." 
Specification 2d — "In this: that Lieutenant-Commander Henry B. Seely, U. S. N., 
serving, as set forth in the first specification, on board the U. S. S. Pawnee, 
did, from on or about the 24th day of June, 1869, to on or about the 4th day 
of July, 1869, neglect his duty, by allowing, for said perio M James L. Oliver, 
master-at-arms, to inflict unlawful and cruel punishments and tortures upon 
the person of Patrick O'Brien, seaman, serving on board the U. S. S. Pawnee. 
This while said vessel was on the passage from Brazil to the United States, 
and while at or near New York." 
Charge IV. — " Scandalous and unofficerlike conduct." 

Specification 7th — "In this: that Henry B. Seely, lieutenant-commander and execu- 
tive officer of said Pawnee, as aforesaid, and during said voyage, and on or 
about the 24th day of June, 1869, on board said Pawnee, being asked by Cap- 
tain J. M. B. Clitz, the commander of said vessel, concerning the condition of 
landsmen Turner and Symms, aforenamed, of whose condition it was his duty 
to be fully informed, falsely pretended to know their condition, of which con- 
dition, by means of his gross neglect of duty, he was wholly ignorant, and 
falsely represented to his said commander that they, said Turner and Symms, 
were "all right: that they had not been unlawfully punished, and were not 
being punished beyond the law, when, in fact and in truth, said Turner and 
Symms had been unlawfully punished and tortured, and were then, and for a 
long time had been, cruelly subjected to barbarous and horrible treatment, to 
the disgrace of said ship and of the Navy of the United States." 
The Court, having found the accused "guilty" of these charges and specifications, 
proceeded to sentence him, and then transmitted the record of their proceedings, for 
revision, to the Secretary of the Navy. 

The Secretary of the Navy, having carefully and deliberately examined the record, 
was of the opinion that the sentence was inadequate to the finding, and, accordingly, 
on the 8th day of November, 1869. ordered the Court to re-assemble on the 16th day 
of said November to reconsider the sentence. 

Having reassembled, in pursuance of this order, the Court, upon reconsideration, 
sentenced the said Lieutenant-Commander Henry B. Seely, U. S. N., "To be suspended 
from duty for four years, on furlough pay, with loss of rank for that time, and to be 
publicly reprimanded, in general orders, by the Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

II. This sentence seems to the Secretary of the Navy still inadequate to the charges of 
which Lieutenant-Commander Seely was found guilty, and the proceedings, finding, 
and sentence in this case are approved only for the reason that they are the result 
of prolonged deliberation by. a respectable and legally organized court, and because 
Mr. Seely would otherwise go wholly without punishment, 

In publicly reprimanding Lieutenant-Commander Seely in pursuance of the sentence, 
the Secretary can only say that, while he believes that the "neglect of duty," which 
resulted in punishments so cruel, could only have existed on board a well-ordered 
ship-of-war under cover of the "scandalous and unofficerlike conduct" which 
availed to shield and prolong it, he can find no excuse for the officer who has been 
found guilty of both. 

Lieutenant-Commander Seely remains in the naval service, since no officer however 
culpable, can be dismissed except in pursuance of the sentence of a General Court- 
Martial ; but not the less mu§t it be understood that the infliction of punishment, 
unsanctioned by law, by those whose authority to inflict punishments is derived 
only from the law, will never be tolerated by the Department under any circum- 
stances. 

Lieutenant-Commander Henry B. Seely is suspended from rank and duty, on fur- 
lough pay, for four years from the date of this order of reprimand, which will be 
read at naval stations and on board the ships of the Navy in commission. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



94 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 149. 

February 9, 1870. 

I. At a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the navy yard at Norfolk, Va., 
January 5, 1870, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, dated. December 21, 1869, of 
which Commodore John M. Berrien, U. S. N., was president, was tried — 

Paymaster Thomas C. Mas ten, U. S. N., upon the following charges and specifica- 
tions : 

Charge I. — "Neglect of official duty." 

Specification — "In this: that said Thomas C. Hasten, a paymaster in the United States 
Navy, on or about the twenty-eighth day of October, eighteen hundred and 
sixty-nine, at or near Norfolk, Virginia, being then attached to the Norfolk 
navy yard as Inspector of Provisions and Clothing, and being, then and there, 
ordered by the Secretary of the Navy to transfer to Paymaster T. T. Caswell, 
U. S. Navy, all the public stores, accounts, and money, in his (said Masten's) 
charge, as such inspector, and to render his accounts for settlement, did, then 
and there, neglect, and hath ever since neglected, to make such transfer, and 
to render such accounts." 

Charge II. — "Disobedience of orders." 

Specification — "In this: that Thomas C. Masten, a paymaster in the United States 
Navy, on or about the twenty-eighth day of October, eighteen hundred and 
sixty-nine, at or near Norfolk, Virginia, being then attached to the Norfolk 
navy yard as Inspector of Provisions and Clothing, and being, then and there, 
ordered by the Secretary of the Navy to transfer to Paymaster T. T. Caswell, 
U. S. Navy, all the public stores, accounts, and money, in his (said Masten's) 
charge, as paymaster and inspector, and to render his accounts for settlement, 
did, then and there, neglect, and hath ever since neglected, to make such trans- 
fer, and to render such accounts." 

Charge III. — "Absence without leave." 

Specification — "In this: that said Thomas C. Masten, a paymaster in the United States 
Navy, attached to and doing duty as Inspector of Provisions and Clothing at 
the navy yard at Norfolk, Virginia, on or about the ninth day of October, 
eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, did, then and there, without leave, absent 
himself from said navy yard, and from his duty as paymaster and inspector, 
and did remain so absent until on or about the seventeenth day of said October. 7 ' 

Charge IV. — " Scandalous and unofficerlike conduct." 

Specification — "In this: that said Thomas C. Masten, a paymaster in the United States 
Navy, attached to the navy yard at Norfolk, Virginia, on or about the twenty- 
eighth day of October, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, being, then and there, 
by the Secretary of the Navy, detached from said post, and ordered to turn 
over the property in his charge to Paymaster T. T. Caswell, U. S. Navy, and 
to render to the Navy Department his account for settlement, did, then and 
there, disregard said orders, and hath ever since disregarded them, and did, 
then and there, depart from said navy yard and go to parts unknown, without 
reporting, as by the Regulations required, his address to the Navy Department, 
but concealed his address and place of abode from the said Department, and 
hath ever since kept the said Department unadvised thereof." 
To each of these charges and specifications the accused pleaded "Guilty." 
The Court found the accused, Paymaster Thomas C. Masten, U. S. Navy, of the 

charges and specifications preferred against him — 

" Guilty by plea." 

The Court thereupon sentenced the accused as follows: "To be dismissed from the 
service of the United States." 

II. Pursuant to section 1, article 19, of the act of Congress for the better govern- 
ment of the Navy of the United States, approved July 17, 1862, the sentence in this 
case has been submitted to the President, and he has approved the same. 

III. Paymaster Thomas C. Masten, U. S. Navy, will, accordingly, from the date of 
this order, be no longer regarded as an officer of the United States Navy. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Nary. 






General Order, No. 150. 

. February 11, 1870. 
I. Before a Naval General Court-Martial, convened by Rear- Admiral T. Turner, 
U. S. N., at the Mare Island navy yard, California, January 17, 1870, of which Court 
Commodore D. McDougal, U. S. N., was president, was arraigned and tried — 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 95 

Captain John II. Grimes, V. S. Marine Corps, on the following charges and .specifi- 
cations, viz : 

Charge I. — "Scandalous conduct, tending to the destruction of good morals." 
Specification 1st — "In this: that the said Captain -/. //. Crimes, United States Marine 
Corps, did, (luring the month of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, while 
at the navy yard, Mare Island, go or send to, and procure from, Louis de Silva, 
ward-room steward of the United States ship Pensacola, the sum of two hun- 
dred dollars in United States gold coin. He, the said Captain J". H. Grimes, 
has failed to pay the sum named, although frequently applied to for the amount 
by the said Louis de Silva, ward-room steward. 
Specification 2d — "In this: that the said Captain J. H. Grimes, United States Marine 
Corps, did deposit and leave with the said Louis de Silva, ward-room steward 
of the United States ship Pensacola, his commissions as first lieutenant and 
captain in the United States Marine Corps, as security for the before-mentioned 
debt of two hundred dollars, whieh commissions the said Louis de Silva still 
holds. 
Specif cation 3d — "In this: that the said Captain J. H. Grimes, United States Marine 
Corps, did, on or about the thirteenth day of August, eighteen hundred and 
sixty-seven, address a note or communication to the said Louis de Silva, ward- 
room steward of the United States ship Pensacola, in words as follows, viz : 

"Marine Barracks, 

" August 13th, 1867. 
"Dear Steward: Will you bee so kind as to lend me 90 ninety dollars, for 
to oblige me very much. I will pay you as much interest as you see fit to ask, 
as it is a great favor. 

"I wish you to send the money in a package by the man that hands you this, 
as I have got to use the money by this evening. 

"I am officer of the day, and I will send you the note or bring it right away. 
"Yours, in hast, 

"J. H. Grimes, 

" Captain U.S.M.C: J 

Specification 4th — "In this: that the said Captain J. H. Grimes, United States Marine 

Corps, did fail to comply with his written promise given to Commodore William 

Rogers Taylor, under date of October 28, 1869, in words as follows: 'I further 

promise that it [that is, the debt] shall be settled within 10 days from this date.' " 

Charge II. — "Violating paragraph thirty-six (36) of Eegulation Circular Number 1, 

dated Navy Department, August 1, 1865." 
Specification — "In this: that the said Captain J. H. Grimes, captain United States 
Marine Corps, did, during the month of July, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, 
at the navy yard, Mare Island, California, borrow money from Louis de Silva, 
ward-room steward of the United States ship Pensacola." 

T. TUKNEK, 
Bear-Admiral. Commanding Pacific Fleet. 
U. S. Flag-Ship Mohican. 

Off Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, January 14, 1870. 

To each of these charges and specifications the accused pleaded "Not guilty." 

Finding. 
The Court found the said John H, Grimes, captain in the United States Marine Corps , 
"Guilty" of all the charges and specifications preferred against him. 

Sentence. 
The Court, thereupon, sentenced the accused: To be dismissed from the service of 
the United States. 

II. In pursuance of the act of Congress for the better government of the Navy, 
approved July 17, 1862, section 1, article 19, the sentence in this case has been sub- 
mitted to the President of the United States, and he has approved the same. 

III. Captain John H. Grimes, U. S. Marine Corps, accordingly ceases to be an officer 
of that corps from the date of this order. 

In revising the proceedings of the Court, it was not deemed needful to consider 
whether the first charge is sustained by the specifications under it, nor whether any 
of these specifications are defective, in consequence of the omission of material alle- 
gations. The circumstances attending the commission of the offense, set forth in the 
second charge and its specification, are of a character so scandalous as to render the 
sentence of dismissal both just and imperative as a punishment for that offense. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



96 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 151. 

March 12, 1870. 
To avoid unnecessary delay in the transmission of paymaster's accounts, General 
Order No. 146 is so far modified, that hereafter paymasters of vessels in commission, 
and of stations within the command of a commander-in-chief of a fleet, must, in 
the absence of the flagship, forward their returns, as soon as prepared, direct to the 
Navy Department, instead of through the fleet officers, as heretofore required. 

Such paymasters must, however, promptly inform the fleet paymaster when and 
by what means their returns have been forwarded, and transmit to him a copy of 
their accounts current. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



Circular. 

March 12, 1870. 
Recent publications in violation of paragraph 184 of the Naval Regulations has 
induced the Department to call special attention to that paragraph, which is in these 
words: 

184. Publications relating to private transactions, or having in view the praise or 
excuses of any person in the naval service, are prohibited. 

Obedience to this regulation is enjoined upon all persons in the naval service. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



General Order, No. 152. 

I. At a Naval General Court-Martial held on board the U. S. S. Portsmouth, in the 

bay of Rio Janeiro, January 13, 1870, by order of Rear-Admiral Joseph Lanman, U. 

S. N., commanding South Atlantic fleet, of which Court Captain Stephen D. Trench- 

ard, U. S. N., was president, was arraigned and tried Joseph King, ordinary seaman, 

U. S.N., on the following charges and specifications: 

Charge I. — "Violation of article seven, section four, articles 'for the better govern- 
ment of the Navy.'" 

Specification 1st — "In this: that the said Joseph King, ordinary seaman, and serving as 
such on board the United States ship Portsmouth, third rate, on or about the 
seventh day of May, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, said vessel 
being then at anchor in the bay of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, being ordered by his 
superior officer, Lieutenant Joim Schouler, Avho, at the time, was officer of the 
deck of said ship, to go aft and take the hoops out of the cabin windsail, did use 
disrespectful language to the said Lieutenant John Schouler, saying, 'I'm not 
going to take seven days on the black-list from a dirty, drunken son-of-a-bitch 
like Mr. Robertson,' the executive officer of the vessel, or words to that effect; 
and when being placed under the charge of a sentry by the master-at-arms, 
the said Joseph King, ordinary seaman, did say, 'there is not an officer on the 
ship who is not a damned beach-comber,' or words to that effect." 

Specification 2d — "In this: that the said Joseph, King, ordinary seaman, and serving 
as such on board the United States ship Portsmouth, third rate, on or about 
the eighth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, said vessel 
being then at anchor in the bay of Rio de Janeiro, did say to his commanding 
officer, Commander A. A. Semmes, in presenee of the officers and crew of the 
vessel, who were assembled on the quarter-deck to hear the sentence of a sum- 
mary court-martial in his case, 'hell will not be full until you and old Robert- 
son are there ;' and, a few minutes afterwards, in presence of Lieutenant Com- 
manders J. P. Robertson and H. H. Gorringe, did use the following lauguage 
to his commanding officer, Commander A. A. Semmes: ' You old son-of-a-bitch;' 
and a short time after the foregoing occurrence, while his commanding officer, 
Commander A. A. Semmes, was passing the launch, in which Joseph, King, ordi- 
nary seaman, was confined, he, Joseplx King, ordinary seaman, did hail Com- 
mander A. A. Semmes with the words, 'you old son-of-a-bitch.'" 

Charge II. — "Violation of article seven, section ten, articles 'for the better gov- 
ernment of the Navy.'" 

Specification — "In this: that the said Joseph Jving, ordinary seaman, and serving as 
such on board the United States ship Portsmouth, third rate, on or about the 
seventh day of December, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, said 
vessel being then at anchor in the bay of Rio de Janeiro, did, in company with 
others, attempt to desert in the diugey of the United States ship Portsmouth, 
and did not desist therefrom until brought to by a shot from a carbine striking 
one of the oars of the boat." 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 97 

Chargk III. — "Violation of article third, section two, articles 'for the better gov- 
ernment of the Navy.'" 

Specification — "In this: that the said Joseph King, ordinary seaman, and serving as 
such on board the United States ship Portsmouth, third rate, on or about the 
seventh day of December, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, said 
vessel being then at anchor in the bay of Rio de Janeiro, did, when arrested 
in the act of desertion from said vessel, brandish a boat-hook at, and other- 
wise threaten, Lieutenant J. E. Craig and Ensign C. P. Shaw, his superior 
officers, who made the arrest, challenging Lieutenant J. E. Craig to personal 
combat." 

To the 1st specification of the 1st charge the accused pleaded in bar of trial as 
follows: 

"The accused pleads in bar of trial to the 1st specification of the 1st charge, that, 
immediately after the date of said specification, viz., 7th May, 1869, he was tried by 
a summary court-martial, and sentenced to confinement in double irons, on bread 
and water, for thirty days, loss of three months' pay, and extra police duties for 
three months ; and that, this sentence having been carried into effect, he was fully 
restored to duty ; nor was he informed that charges were pending against him ; and. 
he therefore prays the Court to dismiss this specification to the charge as against 
the spirit and letter of Naval Regulations, article 32, sec. 1." 

The Court sustained this plea, and dismissed the said specification. They did this 
upon evidence produced in secret session, when the Court was cleared for delibera- 
tion, and in the absence of the accused. That evidence should have been produced 
only in open Court by the accused, as part of his case, and in support of his plea. 
Thus, while the conclusion arrived at upon the proof was correct, and is approved 
by the Secretary of the Navy, the mode of introducing that proof was wholly irreg- 
ular, and is disapproved. 

To the 2d specification of the 1st charge the accused pleaded in bar as follows : 

"As to the 2d specification of the 1st charge, the accused pleads, that he was tried 
by a summary court-martial on the 7th May, 1869, and received a certain sentence, 
which he believes to have been approved in due form; and that, after the finding and 
sentence of the Court were published, he was punished, in addition to the sentence 
of the Court, as follows: On the morning of the 8th of May he was confined in the 
launch of the Portsmouth, his feet ironed to a ring-bolt, his hands in irons, exposed 
to the burning rays of the sun, and was forced to remain in this position, without 
food or drink, until towards evening, when he was taken from the launch to the 
berth-deck of the ship, and there gagged and confined in a sweat-box of such dimen- 
sions that it was impossible to sit down in it. In addition to the ill- ventilation of 
the place, which he was not allowed to leave, a bucket was allowed to be placed in 
the sweat-box for purposes of nature, that was emptied but once in the twenty-four 
hours. His health was affected to such an extent that it was thought expedient he 
should be put under medical treatment, and he was so treated, still remaining in 
confinement, and, the sentence having been carried out, he was fully restored to 
duty ; nor was he informed that charges were pending against him ; and he there- 
fore prays the Court to dismiss the 2d specification to the 1st charge as against the 
spirit and letter of Naval Regulations, article 32, sec. 1." 

The Court overruled this plea; and, thereupon, the accused pleaded not guilty to 
said specification, and not guilty to charge 1st. 

To the specification of the second charge the accused pleaded in bar as follows: 

"To the specification of the second charge the accused pleads in bar of trial, that 
article 10th of the act of July 17, 1862, 'for the better government of the Navy,' 
empowers commanding officers of vessels to inflict a certain kind and degree of pun- 
ishment upon officers and others under their command. This power having been 
exercised to the full extent of the law by Commander A. A. Semmes, U. S. N., and, 
in addition to this authorized punishment, torture of an illegal kind having been 
inflicted upon the accused immediately after the date of the offense charged in the 
specification, as follows: On the 7th of December he was confined in double irons on 
the berth-deck of the Portsmouth, and, on the same evening, was made to stand by 
a reel on the deck, and his hands, being ironed behind him, were attached to an eye- 
bolt above, and kept up for sixty hours or thereabouts, during about twelve hours 
of which he was gagged. He was so confined for ten days, with the exception of 
two periods of twenty -four hours each, and claims, therefore, to have fully expiated 
any offense he may have been chargeable with at that time." 

This plea was overruled. The accused then pleaded not guilty to the said specifi- 
cation and to the second charge. 

To the specification of the third charge the accused pleaded in bar as follows : 

"To the specification of the third charge the accused, pleads in bar of trial, that 
article 10th of the act of July 17th, 1862, 'for the better government of the Navy/ 
7 



98 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

empowers commanding officers of vessels to inflict a certain kind and degree of pun- 
ishment upon officers and others under their command. This power having been 
exercised to the full extent of the law by Commander A. A. Semmes, U. S. N., and,, 
in addition to this authorized punishment, torture of an illegal kind having been 
inflicted upon the accused immediately after the date of the offense charged in the 
specification, as follows: On the 7th of December, 1869, he was confined in double 
irons on the berth-deck of the Portsmouth, and, on the same evening, was made to 
stand by a reel on the deck, and his hands, being ironed behind him, were attached 
to an eye-bolt above, and kept up for sixty hours or thereabouts, during about 
twelve hours of which he was gagged. He was so confined for ten days, with the 
exception of two periods of twenty-four hours each, and claims, therefore, to have 
fully expiated any offense he may have been chargeable with at that time." 

This plea was overruled by the Court. The accused thereupon pleaded not guilty 
to said specification and not guilty to the third charge. 

Finding. 

"The Court proceeded to consider of its findings upon the charges and specifica- 
tions before it, and, after full and mature consideration of all the evidence, find, in 
the case of Joseph King, ordinary seaman, U. S. N., as follows: 

"The 2d specification of the 1st charge, proved; and the Court do adjudge him 
guilty of the 1st charge in a less degree than charged; that is, guilty of so much as is. 
contained in the following words, 'or shall treat with contempt his superior officer, 
or shall be disrespectful to him, in language or deportment, whilst in the execution 
of his office.' 

"The specifications of the 2d charge, proved in part; that is, of all the specifica- 
tion except the words, ' and did not desist therefrom until brought to by a shot from 
a carbine striking one of the oars of the boat ; and the Court do adjudge the accused. 
guilty of the 2d charge. 

"The specification of the 3d charge, proved; and the Court do adjudge the accused 
guilty of the 3d charge.''' 1 

Sentence. 

"And the Court do therefore sentence the said Joseph King, ordinary seaman, U. 
S. N., to be confined in double irons till an opportunity offers of sending him to the 
United States in a United States vessel, when he shall be sent; and, during the pas- 
sage home, he shall be confined in double irons; and, on his arrival in the United 
States, he shall be confined in such prison or penitentiary as the Hon. Secretary of 
the Navy shall designate for five years at hard labor, the time of confinement in 
the prison or penitentiary to count from the date of the sentence; to forfeit all the 
pay which may become due him, amounting to nine hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars and nine cents ($925.09), he being now in debt to the Government to the amount 
of thirty-four dollars and ninety-one cents ($34.91), with the exception of twenty-five 
dollars ($25.00), to be paid to him on his discharge from confinement, and, at the ex- 
piration of his term of sentence, to be dishonorably discharged the naval service of 
the United States." 

II. It is apparent from the record of proceedings in this case that Joseph King, the 
accused, had, before his trial, been seA r erely punished for the offenses set forth in 
these charges and specifications. The circumstances attending his confinement show 
that more was done than merely holding him in custody to await the action of a 
general court-martial. Whatever was extra to legal confinement was punishment; 
and though sufferings were inflicted which no sentence could lawfully impose, and 
which were as illegal and cruel as they were unnecessary to his safe keeping, the 
fact that the punishment was illegal and cruel does not deprive him of his right to 
plead that punishment as expiation of his offense. 

The Secretary will not here comment upon the nature of the punishment as set 
forth in the pleas of the accused. This is under investigation, and will be dealt 
with hereafter as circumstances may require. 

The finding and sentence in this case are disapproved and set aside for the reason 
that the accused had been already punished. 

Ordinary seaman Joseph King will, on receipt of this order, be discharged from 
confinement and restored to duty. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 153. 

April 18, 1870. 
Secretaries to commanders-in-chief, clerks to commanding officers, and clerks to pay- 
masters are officers of the Navy, within the meaning of the law, and are therefore 
entitled, under orders from their appointing officers, to ten cents per mile for travel 
performed^within the United States. This mileage will not, however, be paid them 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 99 

until they have reported for the duty assigned them under such orders. And they 
are also entitled to the actual expenses allowed other officers for travel without the 
United States, provided such travel is performed by the written authority of the 
Department, or, ,if serving on a station, by that of the commander-in-chief. 

The pay of the above-mentioned officers commences from the date»of leaving their 
domiciles in obedience to orders for duty. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 154. 

April 20, 187Q. 
Paragraph 36, page 28, of the book of ' ' Instructions for the government of inspectors 
in charge of stores, paymasters, and assistant paymasters," approved July 1, 1868, 
is hereby revoked, as irregular and unnecessary. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 155. 

May 18, 1870. 
Wherever there is an assistant paymaster on duty as an assistant to a paymaster, 
he will be considered in the place of a clerk or writer, and the clerical force will be 
reduced accordingly. This order will be regarded as taking effect from and after the 
commencement of the next fiscal year. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 156. 

May 24, 1870. 
1. At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the Navy Department at Wash- 
ington, D. C, April 30, 1870, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, dated April 15, 
1870, of which Court Rear-Admiral L. M. Goldsborough, U. S. N., was president, 
was tried — 

Commander John R. Upshur, U. S. N., upon the following charge and specifications : 
Charge. — " Conduct unbecoming an officer. 7 ' 

Specification 1st — "In this: that John R. Upshur, then and now a commander in the 
Navy of the United States, did, at New London, Connecticut, on or about the 
first day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, pay to one M. D. Landon 
the sum of thirteen hundred dollars for the purpose of having said money used 
in procuring the appointment of his, said Commander Upshur's, son to the 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, by inducing the father of Walter F. 
Baldwin, who had been appointed to said academy, subject to examination, to 
withdraw his said son from examination, and thus create a vacancy, and by 
inducing Honorable Solomon L. Hoge, a member of Congress, at that time, from 
South Carolina, to recommend said Commander Upshur's son in place of said 
Walter F. Baldwin." 
Specification 2d — "In this: that John R. Upshur, then and now a commander in the 
Navy of the United States, did, at New York city, New York, on or about the 
tenth day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, pay to one M. D. Landon 
the sum of thirteen hundred dollars for the purpose of having said money used 
in procuring the appointment of his, said Commander Upshur's, son to the 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, by inducing the father of Walter F. 
Baldwin, who had been appointed to said academy, subject to examination, to 
withdraw his said son from examination, and thus create a vacancy, and by 
inducing Honorable Solomon L. Hoge, then a member of Congress from the 
State of South Carolina, to recommend said Commander Upshur's son in place 
of said Walter F. Baldwin." 
Specification 3d — "In this: that John R. Upshur, then and now a commander in the 
Navy of the United States, did, at Washington, D. C, on or about the fifteenth 
day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, pay to one M. D. Landon the 
sum of thirteen hundred dollars for the purpose of having said money used in 
procuring the appointment of his, said Commander Upshur's, son to the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, by inducing the father of Walter F. Bald- 
win, who had been appointed to said academy, subject to examination, to with- 
draw his said son from examination, and thus create a vacancy, and by inducing 
Solomon L. Hoge, then a member of Congress from the State of South Carolina, 
to recommend said Commander Upshur's son in place of said Walter F. 
Baldwin." 



100 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Specification 4th — " In this: that John H. Upshur, then and now a commander in the 
Navy of the United Sates, did, at New London, Connecticut, on or about the 
first day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, pay to one M. D. Landon 
the sum of thirteen hundred dollars for the purpose, by corrupt means, of mak- 
ing a vacancy for an appointment from the third congressional district of South 
Carolina to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, and of securing the 
appointment; of his, said Commander Upshur's, son to the same." 

Specification 5th — "In this: that John H. Upshur, then and now a commander in the 
Navy of the United States, did, at New London, Connecticut, on or about the 
first day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, pay to one M. D. Landon 
the sum of thirteen hundred dollars for the purpose of procuring, by corrupt 
means, the appointment of his, said Commander Upshur's, son to the Naval 
Academy at Annapolis, Maryland." 
'To the charge and specifications the accused pleaded "Not guilty." 

Finding. 

The Court, "after full and mature deliberation," found the said John H. Upshur, 
commander in the United States Navy, the accused, as follows: 

Specification 1st of the charge, "Proved in part." 

"In this: that John M. Upshur, then and now a commander in the Navy of the 
United States, did, at New London, Connecticut, pay to one M. D. Landon * * * 
the sum of thirteen hundred dollars for * * * procuring the appointment of his, 
said. Commander Upshur's, son to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland," the 
payment having been made on or about the 1st of October, 1869, instead of on June 
1st, as laid in the specification. "The rest of the specification, not proved." 

Specification 2d of the charge, "Proved in part." 

"In this: that John H. Upshur, then and now a commander in the Navy of the 
United States, did * * * pay to one M. D. Landon the sum of thirteen hundred, 
dollars for * * * procuring the appointment of his, said Commander Upshur's, son 
to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland ;" but, that this money was paid at New 
London, Connecticut, and on or about the 1st of October, 1869, as already decided 
by the Court in their finding on the 1st specification, instead of at New York City, 
New York, and on or about the 10th of June, 1869, as set forth in this 2d specifica- 
tion. "The rest of the 2d specification, not proved." 

Specification 3d of the charge, "Proved in part." 

"In this: that John E. Upshur, then and now a commander in the- Navy of the 
United States, did * * * pay to one M. D. Landon the sum of thirteen hundred 
dollars for * * * procuring the appointment of his, said Commander Upshur's, son 
to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland;" but that this money was paid at 
New London, Connecticut, and on or about the 1st day of October, 1869, as already 
decided by the Court in their finding on the 1st specification, instead of at Washing- 
ton, D. C, and on or about the 15th of June, 1869, as set forth in this 3d specifica- 
tion. "The rest of the 3d specification, not proved." 

Specification 4th of the charge, "Proved in part." 

"In this: that John H. Upshur, then and now a commander in the Navy of the 
United States, did, at New London, Connecticut, * *• * pay to one M. D. Landon 
the sum of thirteen hundred dollars for * * * securing the appointment of his, 
said Commander Upshur's, son to the Naval Academy ;" but that this money was 
paid on or about the 1st of October, 1869, as already decided by the Court in their 
decision on the 1st specification, instead of on or about the 1st of June, 1869, as set 
forth in this 4th specification. "The rest of the 4th specification, not proved." 

Specification 5th of the charge, "Proved in part." 

"In this: that John H. Upshur, then and now a commander in the Navy of the 
United States, did, at New London, Connecticut, * * * pay to one M. D. Landon 
the sum of thirteen hundred dollars for * * * procuring the appointment of his, 
said Commander Upshur's, son to the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland;" but 
that this money was paid on or about the 1st of October, 1869, as already decided by 
the Court in their decision on the 1st specification, instead of on or about the 1st of 
June, 1869, as set forth in this 5th specification. "The rest of the 5th specification, 
not proved." 

And the Court do adjudge the accused, Commander John R. Upshur, of the charge, 
" Guilty." 

Sentence. 

And the Court do therefore sentence the said Commander John H. Upshur, of the 
United States Navy, "To be publicly reprimanded by the Secretary of the Navy in 
General Orders." 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 101 

II. This is a case of extraordinary and unprecedented character. The facts set 
forth in the charge and specifications were first discovered and disclosed by a con- 
gressional investigation. The investigation and the discovery of similar transac- 
tions between other parties led to the expulsion of one member of Congress, the 
resignation of others, and the passage of a resolution by the House of Representa- 
tives requesting the Secretary of the Navy to convene a court-martial for the trial 
of Commander Upshur for "conduct unbecoming an officer. " In compliance with 
that request this Court was convened, and Commander Upshur has been tried. The 
case is, therefore, quite unexampled in its origin. It is equally so in the character 
of the accusation preferred. The purchase and sale of appointments and commis- 
sions are familiar transactions in the army and navy of other countries, but are 
unknown to our military and naval service. Here every, military or naval nom- 
ination, appointment, or commission should be made and conferred as a reward of 
merit, or as a means of advancing the public interests by opening an honorable 
career to pure and honorable men. 

The Navy Department would not represent faithfully the tone and spirit of the 
Navy, were it less prompt than the House of Eepresentatives to inquire into every 
charge of venality and corruption, or less certain, when discovered, to inflict the 
prescribed punishment upon the offender. 

The Secretary of the Navy, therefore, as requested by the House of Representa- 
tives, convened a Court for the trial of Commander Upshur; a Court composed of 
intelligent and distinguished officers, all of whom were senior in rank to the accused ; 
and, having produced before that Court all procurable proof in support of the charge 
and specifications, it is now called upon to revise its proceedings, finding, and sen- 
tence. 

After careful examination and consideration of the facts and law, the Secretary 
has determined to approve the proceedings and finding of the Court, and to carry 
its sentence into execution. 

The Court has stricken out of the specifications, as "not proved," all the allega- 
tions of corrupt intent on the part of the accused. Commander Upshur is, therefore t 
to be considered as not guilty of any such intention. His guilt, as found by the 
Court, consists in the payment of money intended as the consideration for services 
rendered in procuring the appointment of his son to the Naval Academy. This the 
Court, composed of his brother officers, consider " conduct unbecoming an officer." 
They so declare by their finding, and the Secretary of the Navy concurs in the opin- 
ion. Appointments to the service may not properly be obtained by such means, 
and the Navy, at least, must neither be, nor seem to be, in any way connected with 
the employment of them. 

It is of the utmost importance to the character and efficiency of any military 
service that its tone should be maintained at the highest standard of personal and 
professional honor, and particularly, that it should be invariably regarded and 
treated, by all connected with it, as entirely above and disconnected from mercenary 
influences of any kind. The use of such influences, under any circumstances of in- 
ducement, by a naval officer, to procure an appointment to the Naval Academy, is 
calculated to lower the tone of the service where it should be highest and purest ; 
and countenance or excuse of such action, by his brother officers or by the Depart- 
ment, would bring the Navy into deserved discredit. 

It is hoped that the expression of these views by the Court and the Department 
will serve to illustrate the true character of such conduct, and be sufficient to prevent 
any future resort to purchased services to obtain either nominations, appointments, 
or privileges in the service. 

This order will be taken as the reprimand provided for by the sentence of the Court, 
and will be read at the various navy yards and stations and on board of all ships of 
war in commission. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Sea-etary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 157. 

May 24, 1870. 
I. At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened March 15, 1870, on board the United 
States steamer Wasp, by order of Rear-Admiral Joseph Lanman, U. S. N., command- 
ing the South Atlantic fleet, of which Court Captain Stephen D. Trenchard, U. S. 
N., was president, was tried First Assistant Engineer William H. Harrison, U. S. N. r 
upon the following charge and specification : 

Charge. — "Striking and assaulting another person in the Navy." 

Specification — "In this: that on or about the night of the twentieth of December, 

one thousand eight hundred and sixty-nine, between the hours of ten o'clock 

and midnight, while Assistant Paymaster Henry C. Machette, United States 

Navy, attached to and serving as assistant paymaster on board the United 



102 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

States steamer Wasp, fourth rate, said vessel being then at anchor off" Monte- 
video, Uruguay, was walking in the Calle Trienta-y-tres, in the city of Monte- 
video, Uruguay, he was assaulted with a heavy stick in the hands of First As- 
sistant Engineer William H. Harrison, United States Navy, also attached to 
and serviug as first assistant engineer on board the United States steamer 
Wasp, fourth rate, and was otherwise maltreated at the hands of the said 
First Assistant Engineer William H. Harrison, United States Navy, having one 
of his (Assistant Paymaster Machett's) eyes injured, and one of his fingers 
badly bitten; and that the said First Assistant Engineer William H. Harrison 
did not desist from his attack on Assistant Paymaster Henry C. Machette until 
separated by William Lawton, ward-room cook of the United States steamer 
Wasp, fourth rate, and Samuel Woody, a landsman belonging to the same ves- 
sel, and this latter in the presence and hearing of Francis E. Bond, M. D., a 
resident physician of Montevideo, and in presence of a Montevidean officer in 
company with said physician." 

To the charge and specification the accused, First Assistant Engineer William H. 
Harrison, U. S. N., pleaded " Guilty." 

The Court, after full and mature deliberation, found the accused, the said William 
H. Harrison, U. S. N., as follows: 

The specification of the charge, "Proved;" 

And of the charge, "Guilty." 

Sentence. 

The Court thereupon sentence the said First Assistant Engineer William H. Harri- 
son, of the United States Navy, as follows: "To be dismissed from the South Atlan- 
tic squadron; to be suspended from rank fortwo years, and during that time to lose 
-eleven hundred dollars ($1,100.00), that is, five hundred and fifty dollars ($550.00) per 
annum, being one-half of his.leave-of-absence pay; and to be publicly reprimanded 
by the Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

II. The sentence in this case was approved by Rear-Admiral Lanman, who con- 
vened the Court, and is, though not without reluctance, approved by the Secretary. 
The facts set forth in the specification, and proved on the trial, would have sus- 
tained a charge of "conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman," and warranted 
a sentence of dismissal from the service. For these reasons the Secretary of the Navy 
has felt reluctant to give his approval to the sentence for an offense which is, in his 
judgment, deserving of severe punishment. In reprimanding the accused, the Sec- 
retary is constrained to notice not only the ruffianly assault committed upon a brother 
officer, but also the indecorous and disrespectful conduct of the accused towards the 
Court while on trial. 

Having pleaded guilty to the charge and specification, the accused was asked by 
the Court if he desired time to prepare a written defense. He answered "Yes," and. 
being inquired of how long a time he desired, replied, "Fifteen minutes." The 
Court gave him an hour. At the end of that time he presented to the Court a writ- 
ten defense so disrespectful that the Court could not receive it. He then withdrew 
it, and declined to offer any other and respectful defense. 

Such conduct is itself deserving of censure. It betrays a wanton disregard not 
•only of the laws and regulations of the service, but of official and personal deco- 
rum, and is calculated to cast reproach upon the service to which the offender be- 
longs. 

This order of reprimand will be forwarded to the commandant of the South At- 
lantic squadron, and be by him transmitted to the commanders of all vessels within 
■his command. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 158. 

July 30, 1870. 

In conformity with the 15th section of the act of July 15, 1870, entitled "An act 
making appropriations for the naval service fpr the year ending June 30, 1871, and 
for other purposes," paymasters will hereafter transmit their accounts and vouchers 
direct to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, in the same manner as before the pas- 
sage of the joint resolution approved March 2, 1870. 

General Order of the Navy Department,. No. 146, dated January 1, 1870, and all 
•other orders and instructions in conflict herewith, are hereby repealed. 

Paymasters will transmit a duplicate of their quarterly account current, with 
abstract of vouchers for purchases, to the chief of the Bureau of Provisions and 
Clothing, and when serving in a fleet, a triplicate, with abstract of vouchers of 
purchases, to the fleet paymaster. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 103 

The returns to the Bureau of Provisions and- Clothing of receipts and expendi- 
tures will be made as required by the book of Instructions to Paymasters, and the 
usual abstracts of purchases, with duplicate vouchers, sent to the various Bureaus 
of the Department as heretofore. 
General Order, No. 155, is repealed. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 159. 

August 29, 1870. 
For the more economical administration of the naval service, and in accordance 
with the spirit of the act of Congress entitled "An act to further promote the efficiency 
of the Navy," it is hereby ordered, that — 

I. From and after the first of October next no retired officer of the Navy shall be 
assigned to, or remain upon active duty, except as member of the Light-House Board, 
the Board for the Examination of Officers for Promotion and for the Retired List, 
and at the Naval Asylum. And all such officers, not coming within the above excep- 
tions, now on active duty, are relieved from that date. 

II. Should either of the Bureaus of the Department require, at any time, the serv- 
ices of any retired officer for any special duty, on account of his peculiar experience 
or fitness for the same, especial application will be made to the Secretary of the Navy 
for such assignment by the President. 

III. The position of Port Admiral is hereby discontinued from and after the first 
of October, except at the port of New York. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 
1 Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order. 

November 20, 1870. 
Whenever the Judge Advocate of any General or Summary Court-Martial, convened 
within the limits of the United States, shall have occasion to summon, as a witness, 
any officer who may at the time be "waiting orders" or "on leave," such Judge Ad- 
vocate shall, at the same time, notify the Office of Detail of the fact that such sum- 
mons have been issued; and shall also send a similar notice when such officer is dis- 
charged from further attendance on the Court, as a witness. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular Letter. 

December 9, 1870. 
Sir: Until otherwise instructed by the Navy Department, you will not advertise 
for any article called for by approved requisitions, unless the value of the article re- 
quired is estimated at one thousand dollars at least. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Paymasters. 

General Order, No. 160. 

December 12, 1870. 
An officer of the Navy admitted into a U. S. Naval Hospital for treatment shall be 
charged, for his maintenance, the value of two rations per day, to be deducted from 
the pay of the officer, and credited to the Naval Hospital Fund, by the paymaster on 
whose books the account of the officer is borne. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

December 20, 1870. 
Sir: Official correspondence between subordinate officers at a navy yard or station 
is contrary alike to usage and propriety. Instances have come to the knowledge of 
the Department, in which subordinate officers in a navy yard have made official re- 
ports to another subordinate, and such reports have been forwarded to the com- 
mandant. 

These irregular proceedings can only lead to a divided responsibility, which would 
be unmilitary, and to confusion instead of method in the conduct of duty, and are 
therefore prohibited. 

Very respectfully, 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



104 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Circular. 

January 5, 1871. 
Hereafter, all persons employed in navy yards, hospitals, or stations, to operate and 
attend stationary engines, will be rated on the books and known as engine tenders. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 
To Navy Yards, Hospitals, and Stations. Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

January 21, 1871. 
The Circular of December 10, 1869, in relation to the Ordinary, is so far modified 
that the men of the gang may commute their rations when permitted to do so by the 
commandant of the yard. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, * 
Secretary of the Navy. 

January 30, 1871. 

The following regulations will hereafter be observed : 

First. All requisitions for open purchases already made, or hereafter to be made, 
will be forwarded to the proper Bureau for approval, and when returned approved 
the purchasing paymaster is authorized to procure those articles required, the esti- 
mated cost of which, respectively, does not exceed the amount fixed by the instructions- 
of December 9, 1870, by purchase, in open market, from responsible parties, when, in 
their judgment, expense will be thereby saved to the Government and its interests- 
as well served by so doing, they being responsible that the prices paid are not above 
the regular market rates. 

Second. The purchasing paymaster will advertise on the 25th day of each month,, 
in at least two commercial newspapers for three successive days, for proposals for 
furnishing articles required, the estimated cost of which exceeds the amount fixed 
by the instructions of December 9, 1870; and on the first day of the succeeding month 
the bids will be opened, and the lowest bidder notified to make immediate delivery,, 
unless the price is so large as to make it advisable to reject the bids altogether, which 
will be done, and the articles purchased as above, in open market, when it is apparent 
that the bids are materially above the regular market prices. 

Third. No requisition for open purchases will be acted upon until it has the indorse- 
ment of the naval storekeeper that the articles required are not in the public store, 
and are not due on some existing contract at the point required; and in all cases the 
purchasing paymaster will be responsible for the reasonableness of the prices and the 
promptness of the delivery. 

Fourth. Regulations inconsistent with the above which refer only to this subject- 
matter are abrogated, and when they include other subject-matter they are hereby 
modified to the extent that they are inconsistent with the above. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

[copy.] 

December 9, 1870. 
Sir: Until otherwise instructed by the Department, you will not advertise for any 
article called for by approved requisition, unless the value of the article required i& 
estimated at one thousand dollars at least. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular Letter. 

February 10, 1871. 
Hereafter all stores for the Navy, shipped to California via the Union Pacific 
Railroad will be consigned to the United States quartermaster at Omaha, who, in 
accordance with instructions from the Secretary of War, issiled at the request of this 
Department, is to pay charges thereon and forward them to their destination. 

This is to prevent detention of the stores at Omaha, which is often the case. All ex- 
penses incurred by the quartermaster are to be paid by the appropriate Bureaus on 
his furnishing the bills to this Department. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 161. 

February 21, 1871. 
Officers ordered to a vessel preparing for a foreign cruise, who shall have received 
an advance, and shall have been detained beyond the time covered in the advance, 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 105 

shall have the same checked against them by the paymaster; hut may, upon proper 
application, receive an additional advance at the discretion of the Secretary of the 
Navy. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 162. 

March 25, 1871. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial convened October 20, 1870, at the navy yard r 
Washington, D. C, Passed Assistant Paymaster Charles H. Lockwood, of the Navy, 
was tried on the charges of u Scandalous conduct, tending to the destruction of good morals, ,r 
and "Embezzlement," was found guilty of both charges, and sentenced " to be dismissed 
from the Navy ; to be imprisoned for five years, in such legal place of confinement as. 
the Secretary of the Navy may designate, and to be fined in the sum of two thousand 
dollars." 

The sentence in this case, in common with others of a kindred character, which 
have been tried by the same courts, presents for the consideration of the revising 
authority some questions of very great doubt and difficulty. 

It was tried by a Court of the highest naval authority, who have faithfully endeav- 
ored to discharge their duty without prejudice or favor, and if they have failed to 
reach a right conclusion, in any particular, it has been by reason of conflicting legal 
provisions and opinions, and in pursuit of a wise policy, which accepted the con- 
struction most adequate for the punishment of wrong, and left to the revising author- 
ity all questions of restricting inferences and want of power for enforcement. 

After some hesitation I have arrived at the conclusion that so much of the sentence 
in this case as imposes fine and imprisonment is illegal, and cannot be enforced. The 
act of July, 1862, "for the better government of the Navy," after giving to naval 
courts-martial the power to adjudge the punishment of death in certain specified 
cases, further provides, in Article Six (6), that in the" particular cases where the pun- 
ishment might have been death, the sentence may be imprisonment for life, or for a 
term; and that, in these cases, the sentences may be carried into execution in the peni- 
tentiaries under the control of the United States, or the use of which may have been 
allowed by the legislatures of the States. This is the only special provision of law, 
applicable at this time, which specifically confers upon naval courts-martial the 
power of imprisonment as a punishment, and gives the use of the civil prisons at the 
command of the Government for the carrying out of the sentences of naval courts. 
This provision is, by its terms, confined to certain specified offenses of the highest 
grades. The offenses proved in this case, though of a very serious nature, affecting 
the character of the service as well as the interests of the Government, are not among 
those for the punishment of which Congress has provided specially in this article. 
By every principle of legal construction the specific restrictions of the article referred 
to limit the general powers given to naval tribunals for the punishment of other 
offenses not included under its provisions, and the words "such punishment as a 
court-martial shall adjudge" when afterwards used in the act, and referring to offenses 
of a lower grade not within the limits of Article Six (6), must be held to mean some 
legal punishment other than that which is, in the provisions of that article, limited 
to those of a higher grade. 

This conclusion seems to me inevitable. The ruling of the Department since the 
passage of the act has generally been in accordance with it, and in a case of great 
importance, its propriety was maintained by my predecessor, against adverse opinion,, 
with a becoming steadfastness. But the same conclusion is naturally reached on 
general principles. All general powers of punishment given to naval courts-martial 
are, of course, limited by the power and means legally at the command of the Depart- 
ment for their enforcement. They must be held to refer only to such punishments 
as are sanctioned by the laws, regulations, and customs of the service, and they can. 
never extend to such as the Department has no proper or legal means of executing. 
In this view the imposition of a pecuniary fine, as a punishment, is not within the 
general powers given to naval courts-martial by the act referred to, since neither the 
courts nor the Department have at their command process or other means of enforc- 
ing and collecting it. The sentence of imprisonment for a term of years by a naval 
court-martial as a punishment for an offense, for the punishment of which the Depart- 
ment has no means of legal imprisonment legally at its command, is, on the same 
principles, clearly nugatory. The use of the public prisons for carrying into execu- 
tion sentences of naval courts-martial is given only by Article Six (6) of the act 
before referred to, and is, by the specific restriction of that article, confined, as I 
have said, to offenses of the higher grade therein referred to. This use is not at the 
command of the Department for the punishment of the offenses found in this case. 

The only other means of confinement at the command of the Department is in the 
confined prison quarters on ship-board, or in some small cells which are provided at 
the marine barracks in the various navy yards. These are intended and chiefly used 



106 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

for short terms of punishment for the enforcement of discipline, and for the tempo- 
rary safe-keeping of prisoners held for trial for serious offenses. Necessarily of narrow 
compass, and not constructed nor intended for the purposes of long imprisonment, 
they are neither commodious nor secure, and have not the proper arrangements to 
make them healthful, beneficial, or humane. While criminals of the highest grade, 
convicted on deliberate trial by jury, under the careful provisions of the criminal 
law, are guarded in their imprisonment by humane and wise laws, providing for and 
regulating their moral, mental, and physical health, and looking to their improve- 
ment and ultimate reform, I do not feel that imprisonment for long terms, in cells 
like those I have mentioned, on the sentence of a court-martial, under the summary 
processes of military law, for the offenses found in this case, is either authorized by 
law, sanctioned by custom, or justified by humanity. 

The discipline of the naval service must be strict, the tribunals for its enforcement 
must be summary, and their legal sentences should be carried into execution without 
regard to technicalities which do not effect the substantial rights of persons or the 
precedents of the service. But in cases of serious question, for offenses not against 
discipline or mere military law, and where there is concurrent civil jurisdiction, I am 
unwilling to exercise the discretion imposed upon me for the execution of such a sen- 
tence, the legality of which is doubtful when enforced by military authority, for 
offenses which may be pursued and properly punished by the criminal courts of the 
country. 

The provisions of the act of 1863, which may be cited to sustain this sentence, are 
not, in my opinion, applicable under proper constitutional construction, and the 
restrictions of the act itself to these offenses at the times when they are found to 
have been committed; if this were otherwise, the same objection of want of power 
of proper execution would apply with equal force, since this act makes no provision 
on that subject. 

There are other reasons of a somewhat technical nature which might seriously 
embarrass the execution of that part of this sentence which imposes fine and impris- 
onment, but I prefer to rest my decision on the broader grounds of legal authority 
and proper administration. The finding in this case is therefore approved, and so 
much of the sentence of the court as sentences the accused to dismissal from the serv- 
ice is approved and confirmed ; and so much of the sentence as sentences to fine and 
imprisonment is disapproved and set aside. 

The cases of Paymaster James S. Giraud and Paymaster William G. Marcy were 
tried by the same Court, for offenses of similar character, and the sentence in each 
includes, besides dismissal from the service, a fine and imprisonment for a term of 
years. In each of these cases so much of the sentence of the Court as sentences the 
accused therein to dismissal from the service is approved and confirmed ; and so much 
thereof as sentences him to fine and imprisonment is disapproved and set aside. 

At the same Court Paymaster Richard Washington was tried upon the charges of 
"Scandalous conduct, tending to the prejudice of good morals, good order, and naval discip- 
line," and "Embezzlement," and upon an ''additional charge/' preferred after the com- 
mencement of his trial, of "Neglect of duty." 

The facts developed by the trial of this officer present a case materially different 
from what the Department had been led to suppose when the first charges were 
framed; and the Court have found that the main allegation against him — that he 
had converted the public money intrusted to him to his own use — is not sustained 
by proof. The evidence and findings in the case show the accused to have been 
guilty of neglect of duty only, under extenuating circumstances. The sentence of 
fine and imprisonment is therefore, and on account of the recommendation of clem- 
ency by the Court, set aside, and the sentence of dismissal mitigated to suspension 
from rank, duty, and pay for six months, to take effect from this date. 

Paymasters William Gr. Marcy and James S. Giraud, and Passed Assistant Paymaster 
Charles H. Lockwood will, in conformity with the sentences of dismissal, from this 
date cease to be officers of the Navy. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



€lRCULAK. 

June 5, 1871. 

The instructions of the Navy Department already provide that seamen extra, ordi- 
nary seamen extra, and landsmen employed as coal-heavers are to receive 33 cents 
extra pay per diem, from and including the day the fires are lighted until and inclu- 
sive of the day after they are hauled; and this clause forms a portion of the Shipping 
Articles. 

It is to be understood, however, that this extra pay is to apply to all the above- 
described men of the engineer's force only when the fires are lighted under the main 
boilers for steaming purposes. When steam is raised on one of the main boilers, or 
on a donkey boiler, for distilling water or for heating ship, or for any other purpose, 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 107 

only the number of men requisite to perform such duty shall be employed, who are 
to receive 33 cents extra per diem, as above directed, from and including the day the 
fires are lighted to and inclusive of the day after they are hauled. 

The same men will not be employed on the next occasion, but another set, and 
another on the next, if such subdivision shall be possible, and so on, alternately, 
-during the cruise, so as to equalize the pay and the duties among all the men com-, 
posing the engineer's force. 

While the steam-launches or cutters are in use, the most competent and trusty men 
of the engineer's force will be selected for service in them, and will receive 33 cents 
oxtra pay per diem while so employed; but the pay of any one of the engineer's force 
shall not in any case exceed the pay of firemen and coal-heavers per month. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 163. 

September 1, 1871. 
General Order, No. 159, for the more economical administration of the naval serv- 
ice, dated August 29, 1870, having been, from various causes, relaxed to some extent 
during the past year, is hereby renewed, and will be hereafter conformed to, with 
modifications as follows: 

I. From and after the 1st of October next no retired officer of the Navy above the 
rank of lieutenant commander, except naval constructors, shall be assigned to or 
remain upon regular active duty except as member of the Light-house Board and at 
the Naval Asylum; and the regular term of duty for retired officers ordered to or 
remaining upon duty on said Board or at the Asylum shall not be held to exceed two 
years without special orders therefor. 

All officers coming within the above provisions, now on active duty, are relieved 
from the 1st day of October next, except those on the Light-house Board or in com- 
mand at the Naval Asylum, or of navy yards or stations, who will be relieved upon 
the reporting of the officers ordered for their relief. 

II. The second section of General Order, No. 159, is hereby rescinded. 

III. The third section of General Order, No. 159, will remain in force. 

IV. The boards for the examination of officers for promotion and for the retired 
list are hereby consolidated into one, and will hereafter consist of not more than five 
members. 

V. No more officers shall be ordered to the several navy yards and stations than 
will be necessary to discharge the duties required there, unless when they are ordered 
for the purposes of exercise and instruction. 

This order is made after careful consideration, and is believed to be in accordance 
with the spirit of existing laws and necessary for the welfare of the service, and it 
will not be relaxed in any instance. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

September 29, 1871. 
The following is a list of the medals of honor awarded by the Secretary of the Navy 
which have not been called for, and can be obtained by those entitled to them by 
applying to the Department and furnishing evidence of their identity. 
List of names can be had at the Department. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 



To Commandants of Navy Yards and Commanders of Squadrons. 



Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

October 3, 1871. 
The following modifications of, and additions to, previous regulations and circulars 
are hereby ordered: 

OCCUPATION OF ROOMS. 

In 1st and 2d-class vessels rooms in the ward-room will be occupied as follows : 

Starboard Side. 

Forward room Executive officer. 

Next aft _ Navigation and ordnance officer. 

All rooms abaft these by Line officers according to rank. 



108 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Port Side. 

Forward room _ _ Chief engineer. 

Next aft __ _ .Paymaster. 

Next aft Surgeon . 

Next aft Senior marine officer. 

Next aft _. __ Chaplain. 

Next aft Secretary. 

All rooms abaft these by Staff officers according to rank. 

UNIFORM. 

Masters will wear the epaulettes, cocked hat, and shoulder straps prescribed for 
officers of that grade in the Uniform Regulations of December 1, 1866. 

The uniform to be worn by a secretary to a commander-in-chief of a fleet or com- 
mander of a squadron will be as prescribed in the Regulations of December 1, 1866. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

October 23, 1871. 
Employes in this Department from New Jersey may be allowed ten days' of absence, 
for the purpose of registering and voting at the approaching election in that State. 
By direction of the Secretary of the Navy. 

HOLMES E. OFFLEY, 

Chief Clerk. 



Circular. 

November 13, 1871. 
The Department finds it necessary to call attention to the practice, which prevails 
to a considerable extent in the Navy, of telegraphing to the Secretary of the Navy 
and the chiefs of the Bureaus, at the public expense, upon matters of a personal nature, 
such as applications for detachment or orders, extension of leave, &c, which are not 
for the promotion of the public interests, but for the accomplishment of private ends. 
Messages of such character, if sent, should be paid by the parties sending them. 

In telegraphing at Government expense, officers will be careful to make their mes- 
sages as brief as a due regard to intelligence will admit. The ocean telegraph should 
be used prudently, and in cases of importance only. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 164. 

November 15, 1871. 
Assistant surgeons shall hereafter not be examined for promotion, until they shall 
have served two years on board a public vessel of the United States at sea. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Navy Regulation Circular. 

December 1, 1871. 

The Regulations for the government of the United States Navy, established March 
31, 1870, are hereby amended so as to conform to section 5 of the act making appro- 
priations for the naval service approved March 3, 1871. 

Paragraph 633 will read as follows : 

Medical, pay, engineer officers, and others not of the Line, and not classified by law, 
are placed in the Navy Register in the following order : 

Medical directors. Chief engineers. 

Medical inspectors. First assistant engineers. 

Surgeons. Second assistant engineers. 

Passed assistant surgeons. Chaplains. 

Assistant surgeons. Professors of mathematics. 

Pay directors. Carpenters. 

Pay inspectors. Sailmakers. 

Paymasters. Secretaries. 

Passed assistant paymasters. Clerks. 

Assistant paymasters. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 109 

Paragraph 635 will read as follows : 

The relative rank between line officers and medical, pay, engineer, and other officers 
not of the Line, is regulated by law as follows: 
Medical directors. 



Relative rank of captain. 



Relative rank of lieutenant commander or 
lieutenant. 



Pay directors. 

Chief engineers — first 10. 

Naval constructors — first 2. 

Chaplains — first 4. 

Medical inspectors. 

Pay inspectors. 

Chief engineers — next 15. J- Relative rank of commander. 

Naval constructors — next 3. 

Chaplains — next 7. 

Surgeons. 

Paymasters. 

Chief engineers — next 45. 

Naval constructors — remainder. 

Chaplains — next 7. 

Passed assistant surgeons. "] 

Assistant naval constructors. J 

Assistant surgeons. ) 

Assistant paymasters. >- Relative rank of master or ensign. 

Second assistant engineers , ) 

Kg £ SS y££U*. [ EeIatiTe rank of ""• 

Paragraph 878 is annulled, its provisions having been changed by section 8 of the 
act of Julv 15, 1870. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 165. 

December 5, 1871. 
All applications, requisitions, or communications which, under law or regulations, 
require the approval or disapproval of the officer or officers through whom they are 
sent, shall be forwarded under the actual signature of such officer or officers. 

All communications which are required to be merely forwarded may be transmit- 
ted under the indorsement of the chief of staff, or secretary, by order of the senior 
officer present. 

General Order, No. 115, is hereby revoked. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



December 12, 1871. 

Officers of the Pay Corps of the Navy will hereafter issue no checks against their 
official deposits except in pursuance of law and regulations, as follows: 
For money for payment of navy yard and station rolls, 
do. do. ships' rolls, 

do. do. advances to seamen. 

To pay, or for money to pay, allotments. 
do. do. do. officers. 

do. do. do. traveling expenses. 

do. do. do. authorized vouchers. 

And to transfer money from one pay officer to another, by special order of the 
Secretary of the Navy, in each case. 

When a vessel is ordered to sea the pay officer thereof is authorized to draw from 
the Treasury the balance of money standing to his credit. 

In all cases a brief statement on the face or back of the checks should show the 
purpose for which they are drawn. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



110 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 167. 

December 15, 1871. 

The Department, with a view of establishing greater uniformity in the examina- 
tions of officers preliminary to promotion, as required by the act of Congress 
approved April 21, 1864, and also of obtaining a more accurate knowledge of their 
professional and moral qualifications than can be arrived at under the practice here- 
tofore pursued, has determined that all such examinations shall be held, in future, in 
Washington. 

Officers entitled to advancement, who are serving abroad, will be promoted sub- 
ject to examination on their return to the United States, unless it should be deemed 
expedient, in certain cases, to order them home for immediate examination. 

It is evident that no reference can be had to the files and records of the Depart- 
ment by any Board in session elsewhere. 

GEO. M. KOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



. . January 6, 1872. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the navy yard, New York, October 
31, 1871, Commander Alexander A. Semmes, of the Navy, was tried on the following 
charges : 

1. " Inflicting cruel and unlawful punishments on persons under his command." 

2. " Abuse of his official power." 

3. u Oppressive and inhuman conduct, unbecoming an officer and a gentleman." 

Of each and all these charges he was found guilty, and the Court sentenced him 
to be suspended from duty and rank for three years, and to be reprimanded in & 
general order by the Hon. Secretary of the Navy. 

The first of the articles for the better government of the Navy enjoins upon all 
commanders of vessels to show in themselves an example of subordination. Charged 
as they are with the high and responsible duty of administering the law on board 
the ships and among the persons whom the law has intrusted to their care, often 
beyond the reach of revision or appeal, it is clearly their own first duty themselves- 
to obey the law. 

The 10th article of the code above referred to defines, with great precision, what 
punishments a commanding officer may inflict, and declares, in the most positive 
terms, that no other punishment than those enumerated shall be permitted on board 
vessels belonging to the Navy, except by sentence of a general or summary court- 
martial. 

Commander Semmes has been found guilty by a court composed of his brother 
officers of permitting and inflicting punishments unauthorized and illegal, and in 
some instances cruel, and he stands before the Department and the service, and 
before the country, convicted not only of the grave error of mistaking severity for 
discipline, but of the crime of disregarding the legal rights and immunities of the 
men made dependent upon him for the enjoyment of these rights, and for common 
justice; and of punishing them in direct violation of the provisions of the law by 
which alone he was authorized to inflict any punishment whatever. 

Such action cannot be justified by any conditions, and will not be tolerated under 
any circumstances ; and the sentence of the Court in this case must be sustained, 
not only as a punishment to Commander Semmes, but in the hope that it may operate 
as a warning to all who, intrusted like him with authority, are like him found to 
be unmindful or reckless of the rights of those who are placed under them ; and to 
give an assurance to the service and to the country that every such instance, when 
clearly established, will be severely punished. 

The service must understand and appreciate the fact that the Navy exists and is 
maintained by law alone; that its officers are superior in authority to the enlisted 
men only because the law has so elevated them; and that it is the interest of all 
officers, as well as their duty, to adhere with scrupulous fidelity to the laws enacted 
for their guidance. 

The Court has dealt very leniently with Commander Semmes, led thereto, per- 
haps, by the conviction that a brave and zealous officer has been misled by wrong 
traditions and false ideas of discipline. Had it pronounced a much severer sentence 
the Department would not have failed to approve it. It only remains for it to 
declare that the finding and sentence of the Court are approved, and will be carried 
into effect, and that this order will be published as the reprimand provided for in 
the sentence. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. Ill 

General Order, No. 169. 

February 8, 1872. 

Medals of honor are hereby awarded to the following named seamen and marines, 
who have distinguished themselves in battle, or by extraordinary heroism in the line 
of their profession: 

In the attack on and capture of the Corean forts, June 11, 1871. 

Hnyh Purvis, private marine, U. S. S. Alaska, who was the first to scale the walls 
of the fort and who captured the flag of the Corean forces. [Appointed corporal, 
July 20, 1871.] 

James Dougherty, private marine, U. S. S. Benicia, for seeking out and killing the 
commanding officer of the Corean forces. 

Michael McNamara, private marine, U. S. S. Benicia, for gallantly advancing to the 
parapet, wrenching the matchlock from the hands of an enemy, and killing him. 
■ Cyrus Hayden, carpenter, U. S. S. Colorado, color-bearer of the battalion, for plant- 
ing his flag on the ramparts of the citadel and protecting it under a heavy fire from 
the enemy. 

Frederic!: Franklin, quartermaster, U. S. S. Colorado, who assumed command of Com- 
pany D after Lieutenant McKee was wounded, and handled it with great credit until 
relieved. • 

Alexander McKenzie, boatswain's mate, U. S. S. Colorado, who received a sword-cut 
in the head while fighting at the side of Lieutenant McKee. 

William Troy, ordinary seaman, U. S. S. Colorado, fighting at the side of Lieuten- 
ant McKee, and specially commended by the latter after being wounded. 

Samuel F. Foyers, quartermaster, U. S. S. Colorado, wounded while fighting at the 
side of Lieutenant McKee. 

John Coleman, private marine, U. S. S. Colorado, for fighting hand-to-hand with 
the enemy and saving the life of Alexander McKenzie. 

Michael Oicens, private marine, U. S. S. Colorado, fighting hand-to-hand with the 
enemy, and badly wounded. 

Charles Brown, corporal of marines, U. S. S. Colorado, assisted in capturing the 
Corean standard in the center of the citadel. 

Ox the occasion of, and subsequent to, the wreck of the U. S. steamer 

Saginaw, on Ocean Island Eeef, October, 1870. 
William Halford, coxswain, sole survivor of the boat's crew sent to the Sandwich 
Islands for assistance. 
[Promoted to acting gunner, and also entitled to a gratuity of one hundred dollars.] 

In the Harbor of Ville Franche, December 15, 1871. 
Isaac Sapp, seaman extra, U. S. S. Shenandoah, for jumping overboard and assist- 
ing Midshipman Miller in saving Charles Prince, seaman, from drowning. 

In the attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 24, 1862. 
Tlxomas Lyons, at present a boatswain's mate on board the Saco, who was lashed 
outside the U. S. S. Pensacola, on the port sheet chain, with lead in hand, to lead the 
ship past the forts, and never flinched, although under a heavy fire from the forts 
and rebel gunboats. 

The Department takes pleasure in calling attention, in this General Order, to the 
following-named seamen and marines, who, although not recommended for the higher 
distinction of medals of honor, are entitled to great credit for their good and brave 
conduct. 

In the attack on the Corean Forts. 

John Kelly, H. M. Tolman, and John B. Butler, privates marines; James Martin, 
chief boatswain's mate; Joseph Carroll, captain of the main-top; John McDevitt, 
ship's corporal; Norman C. Roberts, captain mizzen-top; James Smith, captain 
mizzen-top; W. C. Colquehoun, coxswain; John Thompson, Richard Andrews, and 
George Duncan, seamen ; and Thomas Woods, ordinary seaman, of the U. S. S. Alaska, 
who captured flags inside of Fort McKee. 

Thomas H. Baker (promoted to a sergeant October 16, 1871), Daniel Barry, John 
Bourke, Chas. C. Collins, William Dever, George Maclntyre, privates marines; M. 
Brickley and J. Brady 2d, captains of forecastle ; J. Kelley, M. Anderson, and P. 
Engen, seamen ; Edward Mead, seaman extra ; B. Charles, J. Andrews, J. Brady 1st, 
and John Lawrence, ordinary seamen ; William Tate, ordinary seaman extra ; of the 
U. S. S. Benicia, who captured flags. 

John Adams, boatswain's mate; Otto Bruske, ship's writer; William Higgs, ordi- 
nary seaman; George Johnson and James Carr, landsmen; of the Benicia, who were 
among the first in the citadel and repelled a charge made on Lieutenant McKee, 
forcing trhe enemy back from the portion of the citadel where that gallant officer 
fell. 



112 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

On the occasion of the loss of the Saginaw. 

Henry D. Vivian, Daniel Collins, and John Kelly, seamen, who were engaged in 
the holds of the vessel, saving provisions, when there was great probability of the 
holds being crushed in, they having much water in them, and the sea breaking in 
with violence. 

Solomon Graves, cabin cook; George Wanchope, Avard-room cook; Walter J. 
Evans and Dennis M. Hayes, ordinary seamen ; John H. Wallace, ordinary seaman 
^xtra; John Reilley, landsman extra; Michael Lynch, seaman; Martin Doran, lands- 
man; for working in the holds at various times, when it was dangerous to do so, 
owing to the force of the sea and weakness of the hold timbers and stanchions. 

James Toshack, gunner's mate, getting into davit boat, and hooking halliards 
tinder perilous circumstances. 

' STEi 

August, 1871. 

Edward Norton, Charles Williams, Thomas Perry, William Walsh, Angel Daniels, 
.and Edward Hopkins, seamen ; and Charles Miller, landsman. 

These persons, forming a part of draft of men which had taken passage in the 
vessel, worked unceasingly during three days and four nights, and received special 
mention from their commanding officer for energy and zeal. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

February 13, 1872. 

The Department directs the attention of commanding officers of vessels to the 1st 
section of the act of Congress approved March 2, 1855, as follows : 

"That it shall be the duty of every commanding officer of any of the vessels of 
the Navy, on returning from a cruise, to forward, immediately on his arrival in port, 
to the Secretary of the Navy, a list of the names of such of the crew who enlisted 
for three years, as in his opinion, on being discharged, are entitled to an honorable 
discharge, &c, &c, &c." 

In this connection the Department orders that, when a ship returns from a cruise 
and her crew is to be discharged, men who are recommended for honorable discharge 
or continuous-service certificates shall not be discharged nor paid off until their 
honorable discharge or continuous-service certificates have been received from the 
Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting and distributed to the men. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 






Circular. 

February 21, 1872. 
In the assignment of quarters in the navy yards the following order will be observed : 
1st, Commandant; 2d, executive officer; 3d, constructor; 4th, engineer; 5th, equip- 
ment officer; 6th, ordnance; 7th, civil engineer; 8th, surgeon; 9th, paymaster; 10th, 
second to executive officer. 

This order is based on the comparative necessity for the constant presence of the 
officers near their duty, respectively, and will be carried out as the houses become 
vacant by detachment of occupants. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 170. 

February 26, 1872. 
Officers of the Pay Corps of the Navy, attached to vessels destined for foreign sta- 
tions (except the North Atlantic), will, immediately before sailing from the United 
States, deposit, in the nearest United States depository, all " currency" funds in their 
possession. 

One copy of the certificate of deposit must be forwarded to the Fourth Auditor, 
and the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing notified of the deposit. 

The commanding officer of the vessel will give to the paymaster timely notice of 
his intention to sail, in order that the deposit may be made, and will, before leaving 
the waters of the United States, report the execution of this order to the Navy Depart- 
ment. 

GEO. M. ROBESON,- 

Seci-etary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 113 

Circular. 

March 14, 1872. 

Hereafter all steam generators in navy yards will be inspected quarterly by the 
chief engineer of the yard, who will report to the commandant their condition, the 
steam pressure which they may safely be subjected to, and make such suggestions 
as, in his opinion, will add to their safety and efficiency. 

When changes or repairs to a generator are recommended by the chief engineer of 
the yard the commandant will forward such recommendations to the chief of the 
Bureau to which such generator belongs for instructions. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 171. 

March 30, 1872. 
The attention of disbursing officers of the Navy is called to the following act of 
Congress, and Circular No. 15, from the Treasury Department. 

Blank bonds can be obtained on application to the Paymaster General of the Navy. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

AX ACT TO AUTHORIZE THE PAYMENT OF DUPLICATE CHECKS OF DISBURSING OFFICERS. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Home of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That 
in place of original checks, when lost, stolen, or destroyed, disbursing officers and agents of the United States 
are hereby authorized, after the expiration of six months from the date of such checks, and within three years 
from such date, to issue duplicate checks, and the Treasurer, Assistant Treasurers, and designated depositaries 
of the United States are directed to pay such checks, drawn in pursuance of law by such officers or agents, upon 
notice and proof of the loss of the original check or checks, under such regulations in regard to their issue and 
payment, and upon the execution of such bonds, with sureties, to indemnify the United States, as the Secretary 
of the Treasury shall prescribe : Provided, That this act shall not apply to any check exceeding in amount the 
sum of one thousand dollars. 

Sec. 2. That in case the disbursing officer or agent by whom such lost, destroyed, or stolen original check 
was issued, be dead, or no longer in the service of the United States, it shall be the duty of the proper account- 
ing officer, under such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe, to state an account in favor 
of the owner of such original check for the amount thereof, and to charge such amount to the account of such 
officer or agent. 

Approved February 2, 1872. — 

[No. 15.] 1872. 

Independent Treasury Circular, No. 4. 
INSTRUCTIONS CONCERNING DUPLICATE CHECKS. 

Treasury Department, February 2, 1872. 

In compliance with the requirements of the preceding act of Congress, the follow- 
ing regulations are established: 

Immediately upon the loss of a check, the owner, to better protect his interest, 
should, in writing, notify the office or bank on which it was drawn of the fact of 
such loss, stating the name of the officer or agent by whom it was drawn, describing 
the check, giving, if possible, its date, number, and amount, and requesting that 
payment of the same be stopped. 

In order to procure the issue of a duplicate check, the party in interest must fur- 
nish the officer or agent who issued the original check with an affidavit, giving the 
name and residence of the applicant in full, describing the check and its indorse- 
ments, showing his interest therein, detailing the circumstances attending its loss, 
and what action, if any, he has taken to stop payment thereon. The affidavit must 
be made and signed before an officer authorized to administer oaths generally, and 
he must certify that he administered the oath. He must also furnish to the same or 
agent a bond, executed on the accompanying form and according to these instruc- 
tions, which will be furnished to any officer or agent applying for them. 

The affidavit and the bond when executed are to be indorsed by the officer or agent 
as having been submitted to him, and as being the proof and security upon which he 
has acted. After the expiration of six months from the time the original check was 
issued, the officer or agent will issue a duplicate, which must be an exact transcript 
of the original, especial care being taken that the number and date correspond with 
those of the original. These he will, without delay, forward to the Secretary of the 
Treasury, who, upon their receipt, will advise the office or bank on which the check 
was drawn that an application for a duplicate is pending, and the bank or office will 
immediately inform the Secretary whether a request has been made to stop .payment 
of the original, and whether such original has been presented or paid, and, if not, a 
caveat will be entered and payment will thereupon be stopped. 

If the information obtained is satisfactory to the proper accounting officer of the 
Treasury, and he approves of the issue of the duplicate and of the accompanying 
bond, he will certify such approval in writing, on the papers, as well as on the dupli- 
cate check, and return them to the Secretary of the Treasury. 
8 



114 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Any duplicate check issued in pursuance of these instructions, bearing such certifi- 
cate and the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, may, if properly indorsed, be 
paid by the Treasurer, the Assistant Treasurer, or depositary on whom it is drawn, 
subject to the same rules and regulations as apply to the payment of original checks; 
but no duplicate shall be paid if the original shall already have been paid. 

In case of the loss of a check issued by a United States disbursing officer or agent 
who is dead or no longer in the service of the United States, the affidavit or bond 
required to be furnished by the owner of said check to an officer or agent in the serv- 
ice of the United States, prior to the issue of a duplicate check, should be forwarded 
to the Secretary of the Treasury, who will refer them to the proper accounting officer 
for examination and the statement of an account in favor of the owner of said check, 
as provided for in the second section of the above act. 

Whenever such an account shall have been stated, and an officer or agent charged 
with the amount of any duplicate check, the final accounting officer will notify the 
Secretary of the Treasury, in order that the amount of the original check, if remain- 
ing to the credit of the officer or agent in any United States depository, may be repaid 
into the Treasury and carried to his credit and. to the credit of the proper appropriation. 

These regulations apply only to checks drawn for sums less than $1,000. 

Geo. S. Boutwell, Secretary. 

Circular. 

April 1, 1872. 

The pay officer to whom the ninth house at navy yards is assigned by the Depart- 
ment's Circular of February 21, 1872, will be the pay officer who is receiver and 
inspector of stores, and represents the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. 

Should there be more than ten houses, the navigation officer will occupy the eleventh, 
and the paymaster of the yard the twelfth, if there be that number. 

The order in which officers are named in the circular referred to is not intended to 
give any priority of selection. 

Whenever there shall be houses for all the officers mentioned in the circular, they 
will be occupied as heretofore ; otherwise as the present occupants shall be detached. 
/The officer first entitled to quarters shall occupy the first vacant house. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

April 11, 1872. 

The vessels of the Navy have been grouped into classes, in addition to rates, for 
the assignment of allowances of different kinds. 

Marine officers will not be assigned to steam-vessels of the 3d rate unless specially 
directed by the Department, and marine guards will be detailed in accordance with 
the rate and class as herein grouped: 

Colorado and class aggregate guard. . 50 

Nevada, Antietam and classes do 45 

Lancaster, Albany and classes do. 36 

Powhatan and class - - do 30 

Saranac, Lackawanna, Alaska and classes do 25 

Juniatta and class do 24 

Dacotah and class do 22 

Ashuelot, Michigan and classes do 18 

Nantasket and class do 16 

Kansas and class do 13 

When the vessel is detailed as a flag-ship the aggregate number of marines will be 
increased by five. 

The number of non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates to form each 
guard will be determined by the commandant of the corps. 

Sailing vessels now in commission will retain marine guards as now detailed, and 
in case of others being put in commission will be given a guard of the same number 
as when last in commission. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

general Order, No. 172. 

April 26, 1872. 

General Order, No. 112, of March 17, 1869, is hereby revoked, but the revocation is 
not to effect paragraph 57 of the Navy Regulations of 1870, relative to the detention 
of officers or crews on a foreign station. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 115 

Circular. 

May 16, 1872. 
The Circular Letter of this Department issued. February 10, 1871, regarding ship- 
ments of stores to California, overland, is modified as follows: Instead of the stores 
being shipped and consigned to the U. 8. Quartermaster at Omaha, they will be trans- 
ferred to the Quartermaster's Department either at New York or Philadelphia, as may 
be the more convenient, which will receive and forward them as army stores are for- 
warded. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

May 16, 1872. 
It appears to the Department that punishment by confinement in double irons is 
too freely imposed by Summary Courts-Martial. It is a severe punishment, and as 
a general rule should not be resorted to, or at least not imposed for any considerable 
period, except where the offense has been grave or the offender has given indications 
of being incorrigible by milder punishment. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 173. 

May 17, 1872. 
Officers commanding foreign stations will be addressed officially in correspondence 
as commanding U. S. naval forces of the station to which they are assigned, viz: 

Rear Admiral , U. S. Navy, 

Commanding U. S. Naval Force 

on Station. 

Chiefs of staff will not be usually assigned to officers commanding stations. The 
officer commanding the flag-ship will perform the duties of chief of staff in addition 
to his ordinary duties. 

No survey on a vessel in commission will be held without the authority of the De- 
partment, either in our own or in foreign ports, unless the supposed defect shall have 
occurred from the vessel getting on shore or from some accidental cause, as collision 
for instance. 

Surveys on machinery, outfits, stores, and provisions will be held as provided for 
heretofore bv Navv Regulations. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

May 18, 1872. 
The Department has adverted to the frequent use by Summary Courts-Martial of 
punishment by confinement in double irons. There is another punishment — confine- 
ment on bread and water — which, though authorized by law, is liable to be inadvert- 
ently imposed in cases where consequences not contemplated by the law would ensue, 
such as permanent injury to the health of the prisoner. Summary Courts will there- 
fore exercise care and discretion in resorting to this punishment, and not award it 
in any case for a longer period, consecutively, than five days. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 171. 

June 6, 1872. 

Whenever an officer at sea, or ordered to sea, shall be relieved at his own request 
or instance, he shall have no claim for shore duty until he shall have made a cruise 
of the usual length. 

When an officer shall be transferred from one shore station to another, the time 
spent at all the several stations shall be put together and counted as his term of 
shore service, at the expiration of which he must, at all times, hold himself in read- 
iness to join a ship without delay. 

It is proper that junior officers should have the opportunity to acquire, as rapidly 
as possible, the requisite experience at sea, and that the more constant and severe 
duties of the service should devolve upon them ; they must therefore expect little 
employment on shore, and must, at all times, hold themselves ready for sea service. 



116 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

All officers are reminded of the impropriety of seeking to evade their proper tours 
of professional duty, on personal considerations or through the intervention of influ- 
ential friends, thus seeking to impose upon others service which it is their own duty 
to perform, and perhaps hardships and dangers which belong of right to themselves. 

GEO. M. KOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Eegulation Circular No. 2. 

June 11, 1872. 
The Regulations of March 31, 1870, are so far modified that commanders-in-chief of 
naval forces will require the report of the sailing qualities of ships to be made and 
forwarded quarterly, instead of annually as now directed. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 175. 

July 8, 1872. 

On and after the first day of October next the Pacific Station will be divided into 
two stations, to be named, respectively, the North Pacific Station and the South 
Pacific Station. 

The North Pacific Station will embrace all that portion of the present Pacific Sta- 
tion lying north of the Equator, except so much of the west coast of South America 
and of the Isthmus as lies between the Equator and Panama. 

The South Pacific Station will embrace the west coast of the Isthmus and of South 
America lying between Panama and the Equator, and the west coast of South Amer- 
ica and the islands and waters of the Pacific lying south of the Equator as far west 
as the 150th meridian, and will include, in addition, the coast and seaports of Aus- 
tralia. 

The harbor of Panama will be considered as attached to both stations. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 176. ^ 

July 9, 1872. 

Medals of honor are hereby awarded to the following persons in the naval service 
who have distinguished themselves in battle, or by other commendable acts of hero- 
ism: 

Hugh King, ordinary seaman, U. S. S. Iroquois, who jumped overboard, in the Del- 
aware river, September 7, 1871, and saved one of the crew of that vessel from 
drowning. 

George W. Cutter, landsman, U. S. S. Powhatan, who jumped overboard at Norfolk 
May 27, 1872, and aided in saving one of the crew of that vessel from drowning. 

Richard Pile, ordinary seaman, 

John Johnson, seaman, 

John O'Neil, boatswain's mate, 

John Hill, chief quarter-gunner, 

Austin Denham, seaman, 

James Smith, seaman, 
of theU. S. S. Kansas; all of whom, on the occasion of the drowning of Commander 
A. F. Crosman and others, near Greytown, Nicaragua, April 12, 1872, displayed great 
coolness and self-possession, and bv extraordinary heroism and personal exertion 
prevented greater loss of life. 

John Andrews, ordinary seaman, U. S. S. Benicia, who, in passing the forts m Corea, 
June 1, 1872, was stationed at the lead. Standing on the gunwale of the Benicia's 
launch, lashed to the ridge-rope, he remained unflinching in this dangerous position 
and gave his soundings with coolness and accuracy under a heavy fire. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 177. 

July 18, 1872. 
Navy officers and other persons traveling under orders or authority derived from 
the Navy Department, who shall be furnished with passes, passage tickets, or trans- 
portation in any way or kind at the expense of the United States, shall not be paid 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 117 

mileage and the cost of such transportation. The Government has the right of 
election in such cases either to transport or to allow mileage, and when one or the 
other has been done, it is to be considered a finality. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 178. 

August 5, 1872. 

All communications, orders, bills, requisitions, and papers which, by law or regu- 
lation, are to be signed, approved, or forwarded by the chief of any Bureau of the 
Department, or by the commanding officer of any ship, navy yard, or station, must 
be actually signed by such chief of Bureau or commanding officer ; and in case of 
any absence of any commanding officer, of such character, duration, or extent as to 
leave the ship, navy yard, or station practically in command of the line-officer next 
in rank to the commanding officer, such communications, orders, bills, requisitions, 
and approvals, shall be signed by said line-officer, for the time being practically in 
command, as captain (commander, &c), commanding. 

No one is hereafter authorized to sign "for the commandant" actually in com- 
mand, and that term will be no more used. 

In case of the actual absence of the chief of a Bureau, the communications, orders, 
bills, requisitions, and papers required to be signed by him, should only be signed by 
the acting chief of such Bureau specially appointed by the President according to 
law, or by the Secretary of the Navy or person acting as such by authority of the 
President. The practice of signing communications, orders, &c, by the chief of one 
Bureau acting for another, without the special authority of the President, is un- 
authorized. 

Any officer of the Navy who may be required to take official action under any reg- 
ulation of the Department, or any law governing or referring thereto, who may 
have any doubt of, or may desire instructions or explanation as to the force, mean- 
ing, or effect of such law or regulation, or any act or order founded or assumed to be 
founded thereon, will address his official communication of inquiry to the Navy De- 
partment, in accordance with the form prescribed by regulation for communicating 
with the Department by officers of the Navy. 

All official communications by officers of the Navy to the heads or officers of other 
Departments must be addressed through the Navy Department. Any official ques- 
tion of, or appeal from, any order or action of the Department, by any officer of the 
Navy, should be addressed to the President, as the common superior, and should be 
forwarded through the Department, except in cases of refusal or failure to forward, 
when thev may be addressed directly. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 179. 

August 5, 1872. 
General Order, No. 177, is hereby rescinded, and the following is substituted there- 
for : 

Navy officers and other persons traveling under orders or authority derived from 
the Navy Department, who shall be furnished with passes, passage tickets, or trans- 
portation in any way or kind at the expense of the United States, shall not be paid 
mileage or the difference between mileage and the cost of such transportation. The 
Government has the right of election in such cases either to transport or to allow 
mileage, and when one or the other has been done, it is to be considered a finality. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 180. 

October 10, 1872. 

The following-named persons, members of the crew of the U. S. S. Colorado, who 
were conspicuous for gallantry in the capture of the Corean forts, June 11, 1871, are 
hereby awarded medals of honor — the report of their distinguished conduct not 
having been received at the Department when General Order, No. 169, was issued: 

James F. Merton, landsman, and a member of Company D, who was severely 
wounded in the arm while trying to force his way into the fort. 

William F. Lukes, landsman, and a member of Company D, who received a severe 
cut over the head while fighting inside the fort. 

Both of the above-named persons are specially mentioned by their commanding 
officers as conspicuous for coolness and bravery during the desperate fight. 



118 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

The persons named below, members of the crew of the U. S. S. Colorado, have 
been specially reported by their commanding officers as entitled to great credit for 
good and brave conduct on the occasion of the capture of the Corean forts, though 
not recommended for the higher distinction of medals of honor : 

Company C. 

Albert Charlotte and George West, captains of the after-guard; William H. Owens, 
John Corcoran, John Shoemaker, James Mulling, and Edward Anderson, seamen : 
Charles H. Morton, ordinary seaman, and William S. Merritt, landsman. 

Company D. 

Thomas Stevens (2d), boatswain's mate; Martin White and John Lynch, seamen: 
Charles Wright, ordinary seaman ; Peter Vanly, Edgar Crouter, and Irving Hay- 
wood, landsmen. 

Company E. 

James Galvin, tailor; Alexander Frank and Thomas Degan, seamen; Thomas 
Mannion, Timothy Mahony, and Charles Wilson, ordinary seamen; John S. Kisser, 
John Punne, Thomas McEvoy, Maxwell Fields, Joseph F. Beck, and Charles Saun- 
ders, landsmen. 

Medals of honor are awarded also to the following-named persons for heroism in 
saving, or efforts to save, human life : 

George Holt, quarter-gunner, and Paul ToMn, landsman, IT. S. S. Plymouth, who, at 
the imminent risk of their lives, jumped overboard in the harbor of Hamburg, July 
3, 1871, when a four-knot tide was running, and saved from drowning one of a party 
who was thrown out of a shore-boat coming alongside the ship. 

James Stewart, corporal of the marine guard, IT. S. S. Plymouth, who jumped over- 
board in the harbor of Villefranche, February 1, 1872, and saved Midshipman Oster- 
haus from drowning. 

Alexander Bradley, landsman, IT. S. S. Wachusett, who jumped overboard, off Cowes. 
August 7, 1872, in a strong tide-way, to save Philip Cassidy, landsman, of the Wa- 
bash, from drowning. 

James Benson, seaman, IT. S. S. Ossipee, who. June 20, 1872, at the imminent risk of 
his life, jumped into the sea, when the ship was going at a speed of about four 
knots, and endeavored to save John K. Smith, landsman, of the same vessel, from 
drowning. 

A. LUDLOW CASE, 
Acting Secretary of the Xavy. 

Xovemher 15, 1872. 
Sir: In ordering officers to their domicile, or when relieving them on "waiting 
orders," the Office of Detail will be guided by the following considerations : 

An officer who has been under orders full three years from the date of issue to the 
date of detatchment from a sea-going vessel, may be given orders to return to his 
domicile. If on sea duty for a less time, or if detached after any length of service 
from other than sea duty, he will be placed on "waiting orders," unless he be on a 
foreign station, or at Key West, in which cases, if detached without application to 
be relieved before the usual period, he will be ordered to his domicile. An officer on 
duty ordered thence for examination, to a court-martial, or on other temporary duty, 
will, on its completion, be ordered to return and resume his duties. If on leave, and 
ordered as above, he will, when the temporary duty is performed, be placed on 
" waiting orders." 

Special cases, where it is thought that traveling expenses should properly be 
allowed, will be referred by the Office of Detail to the Secretary of the Navy. 
Respectfully, &c, GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 
Commodore Daxiel Am men, IT. S. N., 

Chief of Bureau of Navigation. 



General Order, No. 181. 

Xovemuer 18, 1872. 

All officers of the Navy when ordered to the Asiatic Fleet will be entitled to an 
advance equal to three months' sea-pay, and when ordered to other sea duty to an ■ 
advance equal to two months' "sea-pay," provided they have not received an advance 
of pay within the previous twelve months, the statement of the officer as to when 
he received the last advance being sufficient. 

This advance will be paid by any purchasing pay officer on the presentation of 
his orders by anv officer of the Navy. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 119 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 3. 

Xnrrmbcr 29, 1872. 

Paragraph 1412, Regulations for the Navy, 1870, is amended by omitting after pay- 
master the words "or any other officer responsible for stores." 

Continued Boards of Survey are to be confined to the examination of paymaster's 
stores. 
Paragraph 1413 is amended to conform to 1412. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



IT. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 4. 

January 1, 1873. 

Paragraph 1490, Regulations for the Navy, 1870, is rescinded from this date. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular Letter. 

February 11, 1873. 

Sir: Your attention is called to the last clause of the act of May 2, 1866, entitled 
"An act to facilitate the settlement of the accounts of the Treasurer of the United 
States, and to secure certain moneys to the people of the United States or to persons 
to whom they are due, and who are entitled to receive the same," by which it is made 
obligatory upon the disbursing officers of the Navy to report to the Secretary of the 
Treasury on the 30th day of June of each year succeeding said act to report all checks 
issued by them remaining unpaid and outstanding for three years or more. 

This circular is issued at the request of the Secretary of the Treasury, and if you 
have issued any check or checks dated on or after three years anterior to the date of 
this circular you will at once report such fact to the Secretary of the Treasury, 
stating fully in such report the name of the payee, for what purpose given, the office 
on which drawn, the number of the voucher received therefor, and the date, number, 
and amount for which it was drawn, and, when known, the residence of the payee, 
and hereafter, under the same circumstances, make a similar report on the 30th day 
of June of each year. 

Very respectfullv, 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

February 25, 1873. 
The attention of disbursing officers of the Navy is caUed to the following circular 
issued by the Secretary of the Treasury, amendatory of that of January 2, 1872, rel- 
ative to public moneys and official checks of United States disbursing officers : 

Treasury Department, February 14, 1873. 
That paragraph of Independent Treasury Circular No. 1, of January 2, 1872, limit- 
ing transfer checks drawn by one disbursing officer in favor of another to transfers 
of credits on the books of the depository where they are payable, is hereby revoked. 

Geo. S. Boutwell, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 

The paragraph of circular of January 2, 1872, is as follows: 

"Transfer checks drawn by one disbursing officer in favor of another will be used 
only to effect a transfer of credit from the drawer to the payee in the depository 
where they are payable, and to which they should be transmitted by the payee for 
such purpose." 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

March 6, 1873. 
To enable the Treasury Department to comply with the provisions of the 5th sec- 
tion of the General Legislative, Executive and Judicial Appropriation Act, approved 
May 8, 1872, all officers of the Navy in making deposits of proceeds of sales of con- 
demned stores, supplies, or other public property, will state, as far as practicable, 



120 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

the appropriation or appropriations from which the articles sold were originally pur- 
chased, the Bureau to which the appropriation pertains, and the character of the 
articles themselves. This information, if sufficiently brief, can be given for indorse- 
ment on the face or back of the certificate; otherwise in an accompanying letter. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 182. 

April 2, 1873. 
I. At a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the navy yard, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, February 12, 1873, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, dated February 4, 
1873, of which Court Commodore E. G. Parrott, U. S. Navy, was president, was tried 
Lieutenant Commander Wm. K. Wheeler, U. S. Navy, upon the following charges and 
specifications : 

Charge I. — " Disobedience of orders." 

Specification 1st — In this : that said William K. Wheeler, a lieutenant commander in tho 
Navy of the United States, and officially attached to the United States torpedo 
station at Newport, Rhode Island, being ordered by his superior officer, Lieu- 
tenant Commander Bartlett J. Cromwell, of said U. S. Navy, to assist in man- 
ning a boat to be used for the purpose of experiment and instruction in laying 
down torpedoes, refused to obey said order, and then and there disobeyed said 
order. 
All this at said station, at said Newport, on or about the eighth day of January, 
eighteen hundred and seventy-three. 

Specification 2d — In this: that the said William K. Wheeler, a lieutenant commander in 
the United States Navy, and stationed for duty at the torpedo station at New- 
port, Rhode Island, being ordered by Lieutenant Commander Henry B. Robeson, 
his superior officer, in charge of said station, to assist Lieutenant Commander 
Bartlett J. Cromwell in experimental duty, refused to obey said order, and dis- 
obeyed the same. 
All this on or about the eighth day of January, eighteen hundred and seventy- 
three, at said Newport. 
Charge II. — " Insubordination and disorderly conduct, to the prejudice of disciplin* 

and good order.'* 
Specification 1st — In this : that said Lieutenant Commander Wm. K. Wheeler, an officer 
of the United States Navy, officially stationed for torpedo duty at Newport, 
Rhode Island, after refusing to obey the order of his superior officer, Lieuten- 
ant Commander Henry B. Robeson, to assist Lieutenant Commander Bartlett 
J. Cromwell in experimental duty, did, in violation of duty, of good discipline, 
and of good order, declare to said Lieutenant Commander Robeson that he, 
said Wheeler, while attached to the torpedo station at said Newport, should 
decline to assist in any experimental duty except such as he, said Wheeler, 
should deem suitable for him, said Wheeler, to perform. 
All this at said Newport, on or about January eighth, A. D. eighteen hundred and 
seventy-three. 

Specification 2d — In this: that the said Wm. K. Wheeler, lieutenant commander in the 
Navy of the United States, and stationed as aforesaid for torpedo duty at New- 
port, Rhode Island, by order of the Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy 
of the United States, a duty confidential in character and of the utmost im- 
portance to the public safety and welfare, and requiring to be performed solely 
by commissioned officers, did, in contempt of said order, in disregard of the 
authority of said Commander-in-Chief, assume to declare, and did declare, that 
portions of said duty, to wit, the physical exertion and manual labor requisite 
to its performance, were labors and duties unfit and unbecoming for an officer 
to perform, and did, when ordered to perform such duties, refuse to perform 
them, in contempt of lawful authority, and contrary to good order, proper 
subordination, and the discipline of the naval service. 
All this at said Newport, on or about the eighth day of January, A. D. eighteen 
hundred and seventy-three. 

Specification 3d — In this : that said William K. Wheeler, lieutenant commander in the 
Navy of the United States, and ordered by the authority of the Secretary of the 
Navy to the performance of duty at the torpedo station at said Newport, which 
was prescribed by said authority for the improvement of the naval service, and 
the good of the country, to be done and performed as a confidential duty, solely 
by commissioned officers of the Navy, did publicly, in the presence of his brother 
officials, and in contempt of said authority assume to declare, and did then and 
there declare, that portions of the duty to which he was ordered, to wit, the 
physical exertion and manual work incident and necessary to the performance 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 121 

thereof, was improper and unbecoming a commissioned officer, and were labors 
and duties unfit and unsuitable for an officer to perform, and did, when ordered 
to do said duty, refuse to obey said order, in contempt of lawful authority, and 
contrary to good order, proper subordination, and discipline in the naval service. 
All this at "said Newport, on or about the eighth day of January, A. D. eighteen 
hundred and seventy -three. 

To the charges and specifications the accused pleaded "Not guilty." 

Finding. 

On careful consideration of the evidence and the law thereto applicable, the Court 
find as follows, in the case of Lieutenant Commander W. K. Wheeler, of the United 
States Navy : 

The 1st Specification of the 1st Charge not proven; the 2d Specification of the 1st 
Charge proven, and the Court do adjudge the accused, Wm, K. Wheeler, Guilty of the 
1st Charge. 

The Court also find that the 1st Specification of Charge 2d is not proven. 

That the 2d Specification of the 2d Charge is proved; omitting the words "and 
required to be performed solely by commissioned officers," and omitting also the 
words "in contempt of said order, and in disregard of the Commander-in-Chief." 

That the 3d Specification of the 2d Charge is proved; omitting the words "to be 
done and performed as a confidential duty, solely by commissioned officers of the 
Navy/' and also omitting the words "and in contempt of said authority." 

And the Court do adjudge the said William K. Wheeler Guilty in a less degree than 
charged; that is, guilty of insubordination, to the prejudice of discipline and good 
order, and not guilty of disorderly conduct. 

And the Court do therefore sentence the accused, William K. Wheeler, lieutenant 
commander in the Navy of the United States, to be publicly reprimanded by the 
Honorable Secretary of the Navy. 

IT. In approving the findings in this case, the Department must not be understood 
to accept as accurate the verbal distinctions under which the Court has endeavored 
to discriminate between the personal intentions of the officer -charged and the legal 
intendments of his acts. 

Whoever deliberately disobeys an order given by competent authority is in legal 
contempt of such authority: and when the Court found Lieutenant Commander 
Wheeler guilty of insubordination, to the prejudice of discipline and good order, and 
not guilty of disorderly conduct, they seem to have overlooked the fact that disorderly 
conduct means not merely noisy and boisterous behavior, but includes within its 
legal signification whatever conduct strikes openly at the organization, or interferes 
with the orderly relations of civil or military society. If this be true, it follows, of 
course, that all insubordination, especially if it tends to the prejudice of discipline 
and good order, is disorderly conduct. 

It is'probable, however, that the Court sought by this finding merely to express 
their opinion that the "insubordination" committed was rather the result of a judg- 
ment misled by feeling than the deliberate intention of a malicious heart. But it 
should be understood and remembered that, in all well-organized society, every man 
of sound mind is and must be assumed to intend the natural and necessary conse- 
quences of his own deliberate acts. Without this imperative legal principle, the 
order of civil society could not be preserved; and the sanction of military discipline 
and the efficiency of all military organizations would depend upon the personal theo- 
ries and opinions, however crude, of the individuals who composed them. 

The finding of the Court, however, establishes the fact that Lieutenant Commander 
Wheeler was guilty of "insubordination," and the evidence shows that this consisted 
in a deliberate refusal on his part to obey the orders of his superior officer, who ordered 
him to proceed to perform the duty prescribed for him and his associates, by the Bureau 
under which he was, by the authority of the Department, assigned to duty. This 
refusal was founded on the assumptions, 1st, that the duty to which he was ordered, 
viz., the handling and placing of torpedoes, and the manning of boats for that pur- 
pose, was manual labor, and, as such, improper for a commissioned officer to perform. 

2d. That the order given him was, of consequence, an illegal one, which he was 
not bound to obey ; and 

3d. That he was the proper person, authorized under the circumstances, to judge 
and decide these questions in the first instance. 

Each of these assumptions is false in itself, and the natural result of all of them 
would strike at the foundation of all discipline and efficiency in the service. 

Manual labor is not dishonorable in itself, and whenever any species of work, manual 
or otherwise, becomes necessary under any exigency in which any officer is placed, 
or is required by the conditions of any duty to which he is ordered, or is prescribed 
by proper authority for his instruction or practice, or to qualify him to instruct others, 



122 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

then such work is not only honorable, but is most officer-like, and specially becom- 
ing to those who, intrusted by the favor of the Government with command in the 
service, are intrusted also with the preservation of its efficiency. 

It is equally true that no subordinate officer can be allowed to assume to be himself 
the judge, in the first instance, of the propriety of the duty to which he is assigned, 
or of the order which is giveu him by superior authority. In all cases where obedi- 
ence does not involve a breach of law, human or divine, the first duty of the officer 
is to obey, exercising his right, if he sees occasion, of protesting at the proper time 
and in a proper spirit, and of appealing to the common superior to right any wrong 
which he may think he suffers. No other course is officer-like or consistent with dis- 
cipline; none other is so expressive of personal dignity, nor can any other be toler- 
ated in the service. These principles seem so plain that it is difficult to perceive how 
a well-meaning officer can fail to appreciate and carry them out, but Lieutenant Com- 
mander Wheeler has deliberately violated them all. For this he suffers the sentence 
of the Court, and deserves and receives the censure of the Department. 

The finding and sentence of the Court are approved, and this order is published as 
the reprimand referred to, and Lieutenant Commander Wheeler is hereby relieved 
from arrest and ordered to resume his duties at the torpedo station. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

June 17, 1873. 
Commandants of navy yards will see that no disorganization occurs through the 
assignment of quarters of officers under the circular of April 1, 1872. 

The same attendance out. of working hours should be required of staff officers that 
has heretofore been required of line officers occupying the same quarters; and they 
should be "stationed" to meet emergencies at fire, and for the performance of ordi- 
nary and extraordinary police duties. 

Officers charged with the duties of the several Bureaus, and having quarters in the 
navy yards, are, in all respects, as much attached to such yards as though ordered 
without assignment to the duties of any Bureau, and are to be considered as much 
"on duty" during the whole twenty-four hours. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 5. 



July 30, 1873. 



I. Paragraphs 655 and 658 for the Navy, 1870, are hereby so altered and amended as 
to make the salutes prescribed for the officers mentioned and referred to in both said 
sections to be hereafter nineteen guns, instead of the number prescribed in the sec- 
tions, respectively, as they now stand. 

II. Governors of Territories shall be entitled, within their respective jurisdictions, 
to the same salute as is hereinbefore provided for Governors of States. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

July 30, 1873. 

All postage stamps required for official purposes by officers attached to the yards 
and stations and vessels attached to the stations, will be procured hereafter when 
practicable, by requisition made on the Secretary of the Navy by the commandants 
of the stations; and for ships in commission in home ports, the requisition will be 
made by the commander of the ship. Purchasing paymasters and other officers not 
attached to stations, but on duty, will procure necessary stamps by requisition in 
like manner. The commandants will make requisitions in due season for each quar- 
ters supply of stamps, and will have charge of their distribution to those under their 
command ; purchasing paymasters and other officers when the stamps are required. 
A report will be made at the end of each quarter of the expenditures of stamps and 
of the number and denomination then on hand. No money will be paid for postage 
or for stamps from any appropriation other than that for postage. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 123 

General Order, No. 183. 

August 4, 1873. 

The following Executive Order is published for the information and guidance of 
all concerned: 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Acfg Secretary of the Navy. 



Executive Mansion, August 4, 1873. 
From the 1st day of October, 1873, the pay of master-at-arms, also of ship's yeoman, 
in the Navy, will be increased as follows: 
First-rate ships, to $60 per month. 
Second-rate ships, to $60 per month. 
Third-rate ships, to $55 per month. 
Fourth-rate ships, to $50 per month. 

In Receiving ships at Brooklyn and Charlestown, to $60 per month; at Philadel- 
phia, to $55 per month: and in other Receiving ships, to $50 per month. 

U. S. GRANT. 
Hon. Geo. M. Robeson, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 6. 

October 4, 1873. 
The Department does not desire assistant engineers on board steamships in commis- 
sion to be assigned to the same duties with the machinists; nor to relieve them, or to 
be relieved by them while on duty. 

Machinists are to be given charge of the watches, in the engine-room, under the 
general supervision of the engineers. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Acfg Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

October 6, 1873. 
Executive officers <3f ships of war of the Navy are not to issue orders in writing, or 
otherwise, for the general duties of the ship on which they are serving. 

Such orders are to proceed from the commanding officer only, and are to be issued 
by him. 

Commanding officers of ships are to correspond with their commander or chief, or 
with the Navy Department or appropriate Bureau-, in relation to matters of detail 
pertaining to their command, and. are not to forward letters from their subordinates 
on such subjects. 

This circular is called for because of instances of orders for general observance 
issued by executive officers, and approved by the commanding officer, that have come 
to the notice of the Department, and also because of the receipt of letters from equip- 
ment, engineer, and other officers addressed to the Department, and forwarded by 
commanding officers, on matters which pertain to the responsibilities of the latter 
alone. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Acfg Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

November 1, 1873. 
Paymaster's yeomen of the 2d class, from and after this date, Avill receive $50 per 
month, and paymaster's yeomen of the 3d class will receive $40 per month. 

Paymaster's yeomen of the 1st class will be allowed to 1st and 2d rates, to navy 
yards, to receiving ships, and to the Naval Academy. 
Paymaster's yeomen of the 2d class will be allowed to store-ships and to 3d rates. 
Paymaster's yeomen of the 3d class will be allowed to 4th rates. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Nary. 

December 5, 1873. 

The following Executive Order is published for the information and guidance of 
all concerned: 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



124 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Executive Mansion, December 5, 1873. 
The pay of machinists in the Navy of the United States will be seventy-five dollar* 
per month from the first day of January, A. D. 1874. 

U. S. GRANT. 



General Order, No. 185. 

December 13, 1873. 
The President of the United States commands it to be made known that all sailors 
and marines who have deserted the naval service, and who shall, on or before the first 
day of February, 1874, surrender themselves at any naval station, shall receive a full 
pardon, only forfeiting the pay and allowances due them; and shall be restored to 
duty without trial or punishment on condition that they faithfully serve out the full 
term of their enlistment unfulfilled at the time of their desertion. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 






General Order, No. 186. 

January 4, 1874. 

The Department is gratified to publish, in a general order, the following report, 
with its accompanying commendatory special order, from Captain S. P. Carter, com- 
manding the United States steamer Alaska, relative to the gallant conduct of Mid- 
shipman Lucien Young, of the U. S. Navy, attached to that vessel. 

The act of Midshipman Young was one of extraordinary heroism — an instance, as 
rare as it was brave, where a person leaped into the sea from a vessel going at a fair 
rate of speed, and imperiled his own life to save the life of another. 

Such an exhibition of bravery and presence of mind, and such ability and success 
in seizing and bearing a wounded comrade to the life-buoy and sustaining him until 
succor could arrive, deserve and receive the warmest appreciation of the Department, 
and cannot fail to be admired and applauded by all whom the facts may reach. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. S. Alaska (2d Rate), 
Tarragona, Spain, November 22, 1873. 

Sir: It is my pleasant privilege to make known to the Department an act of 
special gallantry on the part of Midshipman Lucien Young of this vessel. 

On the 10th instant, when making a passage from Barcelona to this place, and 
while engaged in shifting topsail yards, James Anderson (seaman), was struck on the 
head by a block and knocked overboard from the main top. The ship was going six 
to seven knots through the water at the time. Midshipman Young was stationed on 
the poop to note the time of the exercise. On seeing Anderson fall, he jumped over- 
board, seized the injured man, swam with him to and placed him upon the life-buoy, 
where he held him until both were picked up by the ship's life-boat. 

Besides a severe scalp wound, received from the block, Anderson's shoulder was 
dislocated in his fall, and he was in other respects so injured that but for the heroic 
conduct of Midshipman Young he must have perished. 

I inclose, herewith, a copy of a complimentary order, published at general muster 
on board this vessel to-day. I am sure the Department will find as much pleasure 
in acknowledging, in a suitable manner, the gallantry of Midshipman Young, as I 
do in bringing his conduct to your notice. 

He is a young officer of great worth and sterling integrity. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. P. CARTER, Captain Comd'g. 
Hon. Geo. M. Robeson, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. 

Special Order, No. 1. 

U. S. S. Alaska (2d Rate), 
Tarragona, Spain, November 12, 1873. 
The captain commanding desires to express in this public manner his appreciation 
of the gallant conduct of Midshipman Lucien Young, on the 10th instant, in jump- 
ing overboard, while the ship was under way, for the purpose of saving from drown- 
ing James Anderson (seaman), who fell from aloft. Owing to the injuries which 
Anderson received in falling, there is little doubt that he would have perished but 
for the noble efforts of Midshipman Young. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 125 

Acts of heroism have won the plaudits of all nations in every age of the world, 
nor have they in these latter days, matter of fact though the period is termed, less 
power to stir the blood and win the applause of men than at former times, and we 
to-day, officers and crew, unite in bestowing our plaudits upon one of our number 
for a deed of daring which not only reflects credit upon, but ennobles the service to 
which we belong. 

It will be the duty and pleasure of the captain commanding to report the gallant 
conduct of Midshipman Young to the Hon. Secretary of the Navy, with the confi- 
dent assurance that it will be acknowledged in befitting terms by the head of the 
Department. 

S. P. CARTER, Captain Comd'g. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 7. 

Relative to examination of Acting Gunners for entrance, and subsequently for 
a warrant, as Gunner. 

January 7, 1874. 

Paragraph 863, Regulations for the Navy, 1870, is hereby altered and amended to 
read as follows: 

A candidate for the appointment of acting gunner mvist be a seaman of sober and 
correct habits, must be not less than twenty-one nor more than thirty-five years of 
age, and must, previous to the professional examination, pass the required physical 
examination. 

He must understand the manner of fitting magazines, shell-rooms, shell-houses, 
and light-rooms ; the manner of stowing and preserving powder, projectiles, fire- 
works, and all ordnance stores afloat and ashore ; the manner of handling and 
securing guns. 

He must be able to put up all kinds of ammunition, to take impressions of vent 
and bore, to star-gauge guns, to adjust, verify, and use sights, and to fit all gun-gear. 

He must thoroughly understand and be able to explain all fuses in use in the Navy. 

He must be fully conversant with all orders and regulations in regard to the care 
and handling of ordnance material and stores afloat and ashore, and with the 
charges of powder for guns and projectiles of every caliber. 

He must be able to read and write with facility; must understand the first four 
rules of arithmetic and proportion : must be able to keep the gunner's accounts cor- 
rectly, and must have made a cruise in a sea-going vessel of war. 

Hereafter, no person shall be appointed an acting gunner until he shall have sat- 
isfactorily passed an examination on the subjects here mentioned, and no acting 
gunner shall receive a warrant as gunner until after making a cruise of not less 
than one year, as acting gunner, in a sea-going vessel of war, and after a course of 
laboratory instruction at the Washington navy yard, he shall have passed a thor- 
ough examination before a duly authorized Board of Line Officers, and no acting 
gunner shall be so examined unless he shall present commendatory letters from his 
commanding officer. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 187. 

February 3, 1874. 
The commandant of the several stations will take special care that no gas is certi- 
fied and paid for out of Government funds except that consumed within the precincts 
of the navy yards and stations under their command, and in the public buildings and 
quarters belonging to the Government and under military control which are occupied 
by the officers and men stationed, under orders, at such yards and stations. Private 
quarters outside of the public establishments, though occupied by officers, are not to 
"be considered such public buildings, and must not be lighted at public expense. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 8. 

February 28, 1874. 

The rate of engineer's yeoman of the 1st, 2d, and 3d classes is hereby established. 

They will be appointed by the senior engineer, but all such appointments must 
bear the approval of the commander of the vessel and be subject to the conditions 
of paragraph 892, Navy Regulations. They will receive the same pay as the ship's 
yeoman of the ship to which they are attached, and will rank next after him in the 
class ranking next after the master-at-arms. 



126 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Those of the 1st class will be allowed to steam-vessels of the 1st and 2d rate ; thosa 
of the 2d class will be allowed to steam-vessels of the 3d rate, and those of the 3d 
class will be allowed to steam-vessels of the 4th rate. 

The regulations applying to the discharge of ship's yeoman, relative to the account- 
ability for stores, &c, will also apply to the discharge of engineer's yeoman. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



March 17, 1874. 

Purchasing paymasters will procure all articles necessary to be bought on open- 
purchase requisitions at the places at which they are stationed, if it is practicable to 
do so, unless they are satisfied that any particular item or items can be purchased 
elsewhere at a lower price. In such case, or if any article so required cannot be pro- 
cured at the place in question, reference will be made immediately to the Bureau 
concerned. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

March 17, 1874. 
Officers of the several branches of the naval service are requested to collect and 
forward to the Navy Department all information on professional subjects, and also 
in any branch of natural science which may come under their observation. 

The opportunities are excellent, and it will be gratifying to the Department to see 
that they are availed of, and that the results obtained be forwarded to the respective 
Bureaus for publication when thought of advantage, either professionally or to men 
of science. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

May 4, 1874. 
Any vessel-of-war, or vessel under this Department, that may require a pilot in 
the waters of any State will take a State pilot. If provided with a coast pilot, and 
no other pilot is taken, no allowance will be given the coast pilot for local pilotage. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

June 17, 1874. . 
The class of midshipmen who graduated from the Naval Academy in 1872, and all 
subsequent classes, will, upon their final examination preliminary to promotion, be 
examined by the Board in Naval Tactics in addition to the usual subjects. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order. No. 188. 

June 24, 1874. 

Increased economy in every branch of naval expenditure is indispensably necessary. 

Commanders-in-chief, and commanders of ships acting singly, are reminded that 
their vessels are most liberally fitted out in every department on going into commis- 
sion, and are supplied with a generous allowance of stores for the cruise. 

An avoidance of waste in the issue of the stores, and an efficient professional over- 
sight of all articles in use, including the rigging and sails, to prevent undue wear 
and tear, should render it unnecessary to purchase any stores abroad, except such 
articles as manifestly are not and cannot be supplied in quantities to last beyond a 
certain time, such as fuel, water, provisions, oil, &c, and it should be the pride of 
commanding officers to complete a cruise without incurring bills that require an 
investigation. 

Ships will be apt to need calking in their upper works once during a cruise, besides 
the partial work performed by her own hands, and resort may be necessary, at times, 
to shops on shore for repairs to the steam machinery, but all ordinary work should 
be done through her own resources, or with the assistance of the flag and other ships. 
When the Department receives excessive bills for repairs, or bills for awnings, boat- 
sails, mess-cloths, tarpaulins, &c, from ships, flag or otherwise, having sailmakers 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 127 

and sailmakers' unites on board, it cannot form a very favorable estimate of the officers 
who permit such expenditures, or who purchase minor articles on shore that could 
and should be made on board. 

Furniture cannot be replaced during a cruise at the expense of the United States. 
It must be taken care of and made to last. 

No alteration of inboard designs will be allowed on bulkheads, berths, store-rooms, 
lockers, pantries, &o., without the permission of the Department, nor will any 
exchange of boats be made between ships, unless it be to replace a boat that has 
been lost or condemned by another that can be spared. 

The Department prohibits, absolutely, any expenditure of money or stores in excess 
of the allowance without its assent. 

Without going more into particulars, the Secretary regrets that he has to say that 
he will be obliged to hold commanders-in-chief and all commanding officers to a strict 
accountability for any apparent over-expenditure of money or stores, and his first act 
in such cases will be the disapproval of the bills until the positive necessity for the 
expenditure is satisfactorily proved. They must make their ships self-sustaining 
under all the ordinary conditions of a cruise. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

July 1, 1874. 

The following provision of the act entitled "An act making appropriations for the sup- 
port of the Army for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, one thousand eight hundred and 
seventy-five, and for other purposes," is hereby published for the information of all con- 
cerned : 

"Provided : That only actual traveling expenses shall be allowed to any person 
holding employment or appointment under the United States, and all allowances for 
mileages and transportation, in excess of the amount actually paid are hereby declared 
illegal ; and no credit shall be allowed to any of the disbursing officers of the United 
States for payments or allowances in violation of this provision." 

For the purpose of putting into practical operation the foregoing provision, the 
following order is made: 

Transportation in lieu of mileage for officers of the Navy and other persons holding 
employment or appointment under the Navy Department or any Bureau thereof, and 
traveling under orders from competent authority, will be confined to actual traveling 
expenses usual and essential to the ordinary comforts of travelers of the first class, 
and will embrace the following items of expenditure only: 

First. Fares on railroads, steamboats, and packets ; hack and other conveyance for 
self and baggage to and from points of arrival and departure, and fees for baggage, 
express, and porters; also hire of special transportation, either by land or water, 
when there are no regular means of conveyance, and charges for ferriages, tolls, and 
horse-keeping when transportation is hired. 

Second. Customary state-room accommodations on steamers, boats, &c; sleeping- 
car fare for one double berth for each person; one seat in parlor-car, and lodgings 
at hotels en route. When delays at hotels are incident to, and necessary for, the 
performance of the duties for which the travel is ordered, actual board at the hotel 
will be allowed upon the production of the hotel bill and receipt, and a certificate 
that the delay was necessary, at a rate not greater than five dollars per day when 
traveling under special orders, or three dollars and fifty cents per day when the offi- 
cer is detached and ordered to new duty, and is presumed not to be incurring other 
board expense. t . 

No charge will be allowed for hotel bills when the detention is unnecessary for the 
execution of the orders under which the journey is performed. 

Meals furnished on steamers or other means of conveyance, which are included in 
the charge for fare, will not, of course, be made an extra charge. 

Whenever special expenditures are made for meals they will be allowed, but for no 
other items of refreshment than the ordinary food provided for travelers. 

Every officer or other person attached to the Navy who is traveling under orders 
will keep a memorandum of the expenditures herein allowed, noting each item upon 
its being made, and the certificate or affidavit upon the voucher will set forth that 
the different charges in detail therein have been taken from and verified by his mem- 
orandum, and that they are correct and just. The memoranda will be retained by 
those who have been reimbursed, and exhibited if called for by proper authority. 

Third. Disbursing officers of the Navy will pay the traveling accounts of officers 
and others holding employment or appointment under the Navy Department, or any 
of its Bureaus, on their certificates setting forth the correctness of the accounts, as 
per attached memoranda; that the journey was performed under orders (copy of order 



128 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

annexed), with reasonable dispatch by the usually traveled routes, and in the cus- 
tomary manner; that the amount charged for subsistence was actually paid; that the 
number of days for which it was charged was necessarily consumed in delays incident 
to travel in the performance of the duty ordered. The amount paid for traveling 
expenses will be indorsed by the disbursing officer on the original. 

Citizens, not employes of the United States, witnesses before naval courts, will 
continue to be paid as heretofore, viz., two dollars per diem and ten cents per mile, 
and their accounts, authenticated by their affidavits, similar to the certificates pre- 
scribed for officers, and the certificate of an officer that the journey and services were 
performed on duty, will be paid by the same disbursing officers, and from the appro- 
priations as prescribed by existing regulations. Judge Advocates, in their certificates 
of attendance, will discriminate between citizen witnesses and those who are em- 
ployes of the United States. 

Other existing rules and regulations regarding the transportation and payment of 
officers and others, which do not conflict with the requirements of this circular, will 
remain in force. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 

Circular. 

July 10, 1874. 

On occasion of the discharge, or other disposition, of enlisted men, or appointed 
petty officers, serving on board a ship in commission, the order for their movement 
must proceed from the commanding officer of such ship, if acting singly, or the com- 
mander-in-chief, or senior officer present, if attached to a station. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



Circular. 

July 28, 1874. 
No bill will be paid for publishing any advertisement, order, notice, or proposal 
of this Department or any Bureau or office connected therewith, for the publication 
of which special authority was not given in writing by the head of the Department, 
or by an officer of the Navy acting under its special direction, to have such adver- 
tisements, &c, published. 

Every bill presented for advertising must be accompanied by the written authority, 
or a copy thereof, given as above indicated, for the publication of each and every 
advertisement, &c, embraced in the bill; otherwise payment for the same will not 
be made. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



General Order, No. 189. 

July 30, 1874. 
The exercises of heavy spars, required by General Order, No. 128, will be omitted 
until otherwise ordered. 

The exercises of light spars and of the sails will be practiced occasionally, having 
due regard to the weather and to the health and efficiency of the ship's company. 

Running-gear and sails will be unrove and unbent in port when their preservation 
will be benefited bv stowing them under cover. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 30. 

August 1, 1874. 

The office of Executive Officer of the navy yards is hereby abolished. 

There shall be attached to each navy yard an officer not above the rank of com- 
mander, who shall be called senior aid to commandant. 

He shall act as the principal aid of the commandant in regard to the business of 
the yard. 

He shall have no direct authority or control of the affairs of the yard by virtue 
of his own rank or position, but it shall be his duty to convey to the heads of the 
departments of the yard such orders as the commandant shall desire to transmit 
verbally: audit shall also be his duty to visit and observe all parts of the navy 
yard and its establishment, and to make such reports as shall enable the command- 
ant to be fully informed as to the harmonious working of the various parts of the 
whole station under his command. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS, 129 

11' necfcs&arj , Otner line officers of inferior rank may bo attached to the yard as 
subordinate aids to the commandant, for the purpose of assisting this officer, and 
for general experience and observation in the duties of their profession, but they, 
like' the senior aid, will have no authority, except as aids and assistants to the com- 
mandant, as above Bet forth. 

There shall be attached to each navy yard a captain of the yard, who shall be 
senior to all the other line officers in the navy yard, and shall, in the absence of the 
commandant, act in Ms place as commandant. 

He shall have special charge — 

Of the police of the navy yard, and the enforcement of police regulations. 

Of the fire department and fire-bells, and shall keep in good and working order 
the fire-engines, hose and fire apparatus generally. 

Of all the fires and lights in the work-shops, and after working-hours in the after- 
noon, he shall satisfy himself that there is n© apparent danger of fire through the 
night. 

Of keeping the walks and grounds of the navy yard clean and in good condition. 

Of the berthing, moving, and mooring of vessels, and of the fire and other tugs. 

He shall exercise no authority and issue no orders by virtue of his rank, over the 
heads of the other departments, relative to the business or pertaining to the special 
duty of such departments. Should, however, any matter come under his notice, or 
that of any other officer, which in his or their judgment may appear to be contrary 
to the regulations of the Navy, or adverse to the interests of the service, it is the 
duty of any such officer immediately to communicate the fact to the commandant, 
who is, in law and in fact, solely the responsible commanding officer. 

The captain of the yard will be, also, the head of the Department of Equipment 
in the yards, and will discharge the duties of such position, as now understood, in 
addition to his duties as captain of the yard. 

The ordnance officer in the various navy yards will be also in charge of the De- 
partment of Navigation therein, and will discharge the duties of such position, as 
now understood, in addition to his duties as chief of the Department of Ordnance. 

The consolidation of the office of captain of the yard and that of the Equipment 
Department under the same officer, and the consolidation of the Departments of 
Ordnance and of Navigation, under one officer, will take place at the various navy 
yards on the first day of October next, at which date the office of inspector of ma- 
chinery afloat at various stations will also be abolished. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

August 12, 1874. 

The attention of the senior engineer officers of steam vessels-of-war is specially 
called to the duties of chief engineer in the U. S. Navy Regulations, andf to the 
explanations and directions contained in the steam log-books. 

These officers are not to wait for instructions from the Bureau or Department as 
to the manner of operating any unusual arrangement that may be placed on board 
ship, but are to exert themselves to determine it, and to report on such arrangement 
as required by paragraph 508, U. S. Navy Regulations. 

This circular is called for because many quarterly reports and log-books from the 
Engineer Department omit important matter and contain incorrect entries ; and also 
because new apparatus designed for economy has been left unused in the absence of 
instructions as to its operation from the Department. 

Commanding officers will see that the engineer reports are according to the Regu- 
lations before forwarding them. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 190. 

September 5, 1874. 
On surveys held in conformity with paragraph 943 of the Navy Regulations the 
surveying officers will base their estimates on the actual value of the clothing de- 
stroyed, and not on the prices fixed by the paymaster when the clothing was issued. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

September 16, 1874. 
The head of each department at a navy yard representing a Bureau will be allowed, 
under the general instructions of the commandant of the yard, to sign passes by 
which articles belonging to the Bureau he represents may be passed out of the yard. 
9 



130 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Each morning all passes presented at the gate during the preceding day will be 
delivered to the captain of the yard as head of the police, for such instruction as 
the commandant may deem expedient.. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 191. 

October 21, 1871. 
Sea service is not to be credited to an officer except when he is performing duty 
under orders from the Department, as part of the complement of a vessel-of-war, 
belonging to the Navy, in commission for sea service ; and when attached to the 
Coast Survey, for the time only that he is actually afloat. No credit is to be given 
for service in revenue or merchant vessels. 

This order will be printed in future Navy Registers, as was the case up to 1860 
inclusive. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 11. 

October 24, 1874. 

Officers in charge of the different departments in navy yards will be as seldom in 
their offices and as much in the work-shops, or other places where work is going on, 
as may be practicable. They are to ascertain by personal observation, as often during 
the day as opportunities offer, the nature of the work that is in hand and the man- 
ner in which it is being done; and are to make themselves acquainted with the value 
of the men under their superintendence as faithful and capable hands. 

Discrepancies in time-books are not likely to occur if they are kept under the per- 
sonal supervision of the officer in charge of the department, and, to secure greater 
exactness in this very important particular, the following directions will be observed : 

Time-books will be kept by the foremen, and not by workmen detailed for the pur- 
pose, or by any one else. Every day, before leaving the yard, the foremen will 
make up their time-tables for that day, certify to their correctness, and hand them, 
in person, to the head of their departments, who will take charge of them and lock 
them up, securely, until they are required for making up the pay-roll, when they 
will be given to the time-clerk for that purpose. 

The heads of departments will also make a record of the gross time, from day to 
day, and keep this record apart and secure; and will verify the accuracy of the pay- 
roll, when finally made out, by comparing the two, as an additional check thereon. 

No scraps, chips, or any other articles are to be sold, on any pretense whatever, 
except bv the process authorized by law. 

GEO. M. RORESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 192. 

October 24, 1874. 

When ships are building or repairing at navy yards, proper scuttles, man-holes, and 
limber-planks will be so arranged that easy access may be had to the spaces below 
the fire-room floor, the magazine floor, chain-lockers and tank floors, and floors of 
the forward and after holds; and previous to the stowage of any articles, chains, or 
magazine stores, the commandant will require those, and all other spaces where chips, 
shavings, or dirt can accumulate, to be thoroughly examined and to be carefully 
cleaned. 

When ships are refitted for sea, with or without repairs, the same examination 
and cleaning out of chips and dirt will be made and reported. 

The Captain of the Yard, Naval Constructor, and Chief Engineer will be a Roard 
to see that this order is faithfully complied with in all cases, and so reported by 
hem to the Department, according to the following form: 

We, the undersigned, certify that we have made the examinations required by 

General Order, No. 192, and find the U. S. S. thoroughly cleaned before 

stowage. 

Captain, U. S. N. 



Naval Constructor, U. S. N. 



Chief Engineer, U. S. N. 

When ships are built or repaired outside of the navy yards, it will be made a part 
of the contract tbat the above conditions are to be complied with. 

GEO. M. RORESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 131 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 12. 

October 29, 1874. 
Paragraph No. 1122 of the Navy Regulations is so far modified that the journal 
will be kept under the inspection and direction of the captain of the yard, who will 
sign it daily, and submit it monthly to the commandant for approval. 

WILLIAM REYNOLDS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

Uniform Circular. 

November 7, 1874. 
On and after the 1st of January, 1875, all officers of the Navy to whom this regula- 
tion can apply will wear on their blue-cloth trousers for full dress, a strip of navy 
gold lace down the outer seam of the width of that on their full-dress coats. 

After the above date, lieutenant commanders, and officers ranking with that grade, 
will wear on their sleeves two strips of gold lace half an inch in width, with one 
strip a quarter of an inch in width between them, each a quarter of an inch apart. 

Lieutenants, and officers ranking with that grade, will wear two strips of half-inch 
gold lace, one-quarter of an inch apart. 

GEO. M. RORESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 13. 

November 17, 1874. 

Paragraph 1352, Regulations for the Navy, 1870, is hereby altered and amended, so 
far as it relates to machinists, to read as follows : 

A candidate for the position of machinist, boiler-maker, or coppersmith must not 
be less than twenty nor more than forty years of age. 

He must pass an examination in the presence of the commanding officer of the ren- 
dezvous, by at least one naval engineer, as to his qualifications as a machinist, boiler- 
maker, or coppersmith ; and must also undergo the usual medical examination touch- 
ing his physical fitness for the naval service. 

He must be able to read, and to write with sufficient correctness to keep the steam- 
log of his watch. He must knoAV the names of the various parts of a marine engine ; 
understand the uses and management of the various gauges, cocks, and valves; how 
to raise steam, start a marine engine, regulate its action, and modify its action. 

He must know how to ascertain the height and density of the water in the boilers, 
how to check foaming, and to guard against other danger from the boiler; how and 
when to regulate the quantity of the injection water, to guard against danger from 
water in the cylinders, and the measures to be taken in the event of a journal becom- 
ing heated ; and, in short, how to act upon the occurrence of any of the ordinary cas- 
ualties of the engine-room. 

He must understand how to do the ordinary overhauling and repairing of steam 
machinery; the packing of the various joints and rods, the grinding in of valves, 
putting on hard and soft patches, taking out, putting in, and plugging tubes, and all 
other similar work required in the management of marine steam-engines. 

The monthly pay of a machinist will be $75 ; of a boiler-maker, $40 ; and of a cop- 
persmith, $40, besides the usual ration, and exclusive of the $1.50 per month added 
to the pay of all enlisted men by the President's Order of July 1, 1870. 

Five machinists will be allowed to first-rates and four to second and third-rate 
steamships in commission for sea service. 

Roiler-makers and coppersmiths will not be examined except as to their qualifica- 
tions as boiler makers and coppersmiths. 

One boiler-maker and one coppersmith, if obtainable, will be allowed to each first, 
second, and third-rate steamship in commission for sea service. They will be re- 
quired to keep watch in the engine-room or fire-room while the ship is steaming 
and at other times, as may be requisite, and will thus be enabled to make themselves 
proficient for the rate of machinists. 

Machinists, coppersmiths, and boiler-makers will mess with the master-at-arms. 

GEO. M. RORESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 14. 

Examination of Cadet Engineers for Promotion. 

November 17, 1874. 
Refore a cadet-engineer can be commissioned as assistant engineer in the Navy, he 
must have passed an examination before naval medical officers as to his physical 
fitness, and a satisfactory examination before a board of naval engineer officers 
designated by the Secretary of the Navy. 



132 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Favorable testimonials concerning him must have been received by the Depart- 
ment from all the commanding officers and senior engineers under whom he may 
have served. The Department will submit such testimonials to the Board of Engi- 
neer Officers. 

Should any officer appear before the Board whose testimonials are unsatisfactory 
as to his other than professional qualifications, the Board will, without acting on 
his case, refer it to the Department for such action as may be required under the 
circumstances. 

He will be examined on the following subjects: 

1. Testimonials. 

2. English grammar, composition, and penmanship. 

3. Mechanical drawing ; size of sheet 18 by 26 inches. Name, rank, and date to 
be in lower right-hand corner. 

4. Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, mensuration, plane trigonometry, analytical 
and descriptive geometry, differential and integral calculus. 

5. Elementary mechanics and physics. 

6. Chemistry of the elementary bodies, and general principles of chemical philos- 
ophy. 

7. Reading, writing, and speaking the French language. 

8. Explanation of the manner of putting engines in operation; how to regulate 
their action and guard against danger from boilers, due to foaming and other causes. 
Boiler scale; the causes of, the means of preventing its formation, its chemical com- 
position, and how to remove it. The loss by blowing off. The various instruments 
for determining the density of the water, their principles, the method of graduating, 
and manner of using them. 

9. Description of the various marine boilers commonly used, together with their 
attachments. 

10. Description of the different kinds of condensers and air and feed-pumps, and 
their connections; causes of their derangements, and how to prevent and remedy 
them. 

11. Principles and peculiarities of the different kinds of steam and expansion 
valves and valve-gears applied to steam machinery. 

12. The theory of using steam expansively, together with the limits and modifica- 
tions imposed, and the necessary calculations relating thereto. 

13. The construction and mode of applying the indicator, and the interpretation 
of its diagrams. The construction and principles of the various steam and vacuum 
gauges, and causes of their derangement. 

14. Practical building and repairing of steam machinery. 

Valuation of Subjects. 



No. 1 100 

" 2 40 

" 3 60 

" 4 100 

" 5 100 

" 6 50 

" 7 40 

" 8 100 



590 



Carried forward 590 

No. 9... _ ___. 70 

" 10 60 

" 11 _„ 60 

" 12 60 

" 13 _ 60 

" 14 ._ 100 



Total 1,000 



Lowest satisfactorv, 700. 



GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 15. 
Examination of Candidates for Admission into the Naval Service as Assistant Engineers. 

November 17, 1874. 

Paragraph 866, Regulations for the Navy, 1870, is hereby altered and amended to 
read as follows: 

Before a candidate can be commissioned as assistant engineer in the Navy, he must 
have passed an examination before naval medical officers as to his physical fitness, 
and a satisfactory examination before a board of naval engineer officers designated 
by the Secretary of the Navy, as the Avants of the service require. 

Application for permission to appear before such Board must be made in writing 
to the Secretary of the Navy, stating the age and residence of the applicant, and. 
must be accompanied by satisfactory testimonials as to good moral character, correct 
habits, and sound constitution. The application will be registered, and when a Board 
next meets permission will be sent to the applicant, at the discretion of the Depart- 
ment, stating the time and place of meeting of the Board. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 133 

A candidate for an appointment to the grade of assistant engineer must be not 
less than nineteen nor more tlian twenty-six years of age; he must have had not 
less than two years of service in the fabricating and management of steam machinery 
for marine purposes, and shall give satisfactory evidence of his skill in such capaci- 
ties; or else have served not less than that period as an engineer on board of a 
steamer provided with a condensing engine, and must have obtained certificates 
from the director or superintending engineer as to his ability. 

He will be examined on the following subjects: 

1. Testimonials. 

2. English grammar, composition, and penmanship. 

3. Mechanical drawing ; size of sheet 18 by 26 inches. Name and date to be in 
the lower right-hand corner. 

4. Arithmetic. The elements of the following subjects: Algebra, geometry, men- 
suration, plane trigonometry, analytical and descriptive geometry. 

5. Elementary mechanics and physics. 

6. Chemistry of the elementary bodies, and general principles of chemical philos- 
ophy. 

7. Reading, writing, and speaking the French language. 

8. Explanation of the manner of putting engines in operation ; how to regulate 
their action and guard against danger from boilers, due to foaming and other causes. 
Boiler scale; the causes of, the means of preventing its formation, its chemical com- 
position, and how to remove it. The loss by blowing off. The various instruments 
for determining the density of the water, their principles, the method of graduating, 
and manner of using them. 

9. Description of the various marine boilers commonly used, together with their 
attachments. 

10. Description of the different: kinds of condensers and air and feed-pumps, and 
heir connections; causes of their derangements, and how to prevent and remedy 
hem. 

11. Principles and peculiarities of the different kinds of steam and expansion 
valves and valve-gears applied to steam machinery. 

12. The theory of using steam expansively, together with the limits and modifica- 
tions imposed, and the necessary calculations relating thereto. 

13. The construction and mode of applying the indicator, and the interpretation 
of its diagrams. The construction and principles of the various steam and vacuum 
gauges, and causes of their derangement. 

14. Practical building and repairing of steam machinery. 

Valuation of Subjects. 

No. 1 __ 100! Carried forward 590 

" 2 40 | No. 9 _.. 70 

" 3___ 60 I " 10 60 

11 60 



" 4 100 

" 5 100 

" 6 50 

" 7 40 

" 8 100 



12 60 

13 60 

14 100 

Total 1,000 



590 



Lowest satisfactory, 700. 



GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 16. 

Examination of Assistant Engineers for Promotion. 

Xovemoer 17, 1874. 

Paragraph 904, Regulations for the Navy, 1870, is hereby altered and amended to 
read as follows : 

Before an assistant engineer can be commissioned a passed assistant engineer in 
the Navy, he must have passed an examination before naval medical officers as to 
his physical fitness, and a satisfactory examination before a board of naval engi- 
neer officers designated by the Secretary of the Navy. 



134 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

A candidate for promotion to the grade of passed assistant engineer mnst have 
served at least three years at sea as assistant engineer on board a naval steamer, and 
favorable testimonials concerning him mnst have been received by the Department 
from all the commanding officers and senior engineers under whom he may have 
served. The Department will submit such testimonials to the Board of Engineer 
Officers. 

Should any officer appear before the Board whose testimonials are unsatisfactory 
as to his other than professional qualifications, the Board will, without acting on 
his case, refer it to the Department for such action as may be required under the 
circumstances. 

He will be examined on the following subjects: 

1. Testimonials. 

2. Mechanical drawing. Size of sheet 18 by 26 inches. Name, rank, and date to 
be in lower right-hand corner. 

3. Arithmetic, algebra, geometry (six books Davies' Legendre), mensuration, plane 
trigonometry, analytical and descriptive geometry, differential and integral calculus. 

4. Mechanical philosophy, embracing statics, dynamics, hydrostatics, and hydro- 
dynamics; natural philosophy, embracing heat, electricity, pneumatics, chemistry 
of the elementary bodies, and general principles of chemical philosophy. 

5. The details of construction of the various marine boilers commonly used with 
simple and compound engines, together with their attachments. 

6. Boiler scale; the causes of, the means of preventing its formation, its chemical 
composition, and how to remove it. The loss by blowing off. The various instru- 
ments used for determining the density of the water, their principles, the method 
of graduating and manner of using them. 

7. The construction, principles, peculiarities, and uses of the different kinds of 
condensers, air and feed-pumps, and their connections; derangements in their opera- 
tion, with the causes thereof, and how to prevent and correct them. Description of 
various steam-pumps in use. 

8. Principles, peculiarities, and details of construction of the different kinds of 
steam and expansion valves and valve-gears applied to steam machinery. 

9. Practical building and repairing of steam machinery, including the details of 
molding and casting. 

10. A general knowledge of the theory, laws, and construction of the various 
kinds of paddle-wheels and screw-propellers. 

11. Theory of the steam-engine, the calculations connected therewith, and the 
interpretation of indicator diagrams. 

12. Strength of materials, and the influence of form in connection therewith. 



Valuation of Subjects. 



No. 1 100 

" 2 _ 60 No. 

" 3 

" 4 

" 5 

" 6 _ 

" 7 



580 



Carried forward 580 



.00 


u 9 


.00 


" 10 


.00 


" 11 


40 


" 12 


80 





100 
90 
70 

F80 



Lowest satisfactory, 700. 



Total 1,000 



GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 17. 

Examination of Passed Assistant Engineers for Promotion. 

Novem 

Paragraph 905, Regulations for the Navy, 1870, is hereby altered and amended to 
read as follows : 

Before a passed assistant engineer can be commissioned a chief engineer in the 
Navy, he must have passed an examination before naval medical officers as to his 
physical fitness, and a satisfactory examination before a board of naval engineer 
officers designated by the Secretary of the Navy. 

A candidate for promotion to the grade of chief engineer must have served at least 
two years at sea as a passed assistant engineer on board a naval steamer, and favor- 
able testimonials must have been received concerning him by the Department from 
all of the commanding officers and senior engineers under whom he may have served. 
The Department will submit such testimonials to the Board of Engineer Officers.. 



GENERAL ORDERri AND CIRCULARS. 



135 



Should any officer appeal before the Board whose testimonials are unsatisfactory 
as to his other than professional qualifications, the Board will, without acting on 
his case, refer it to the Department for such action as may be required under the 
circumstances. 

He will be examined on the following subjects: 

1. Testimonials. 

2. Pure mathematics, embracing algebra, geometry (through eight books Da vies' 
Legendre), mensuration, plane trigonometry, analytical and descriptive geometry. 

3. Mechanical philosophy, embracing statics, dynamics, hydrostatics, hydrody- 
namics; natural philosophy, embracing heat, electricity, pneumatics, chemistry of 
the elementary bodies, and general principles of chemical philosophy. 

4. The details of the construction of the various marine boilers in use, together 
with their attachments. To proportion boilers for a given power for simple and 
compound engines. Decay of boilers, its causes and remedies. 

5. Principles, peculiarities, and details of construction of different condensers, 
and of air and feed-pumps and their connections. Derangements in their operation, 
with the causes thereof, and how to prevent and correct them. Description of 
various steam-pumps and injectors. 

6. Principles, peculiarities, and details of construction of the various kinds of 
steam and expansion valves and valve-gears applied to steam machinery. Various 
types of marine governors. 

7. Practical building and repairing of steam machinery. Capability of furnishing 
a working drawing. Practical metallurgy. 

8. Theory, laws, and details of construction of the various propelling instruments 
in use, and the necessary calculations relating to them. 

9. Theory of the steam-engine; the calculations connected therewith, and the 
interpretation of indicator diagrams. 

10. Advantages and disadvantages of the different kinds of paddle-wheel and 
screw-propeller engines (simple and compound), to be able to proportion them for a 
given vessel so as to secure a given speed with a given propelling instrument. 

11. Strength of materials, and the influence of form in connection therewith. 

12. General theory and practice of iron ship building. 



Valuation of Subjects. 



No. 1 

" 2. 

" 3^ 

" 4. 

" 5. 

" 6. 

" 7. 



100 

100 No. 8. 

100 

80 

70 

70 
100 



620 



Carried forward 620 



10. 
11. 

12. 



90 
80 
50 



Total. 



1,000 



Lowest satisfactory, 700. 



GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

December 19, 1874. 
Vessels-of-war passing in the vicinity of supposed dangers will make, without 
special reasons to the contrary, such search for them as weather and other conditions 
may allow. 

In the event of no search being made, the commanding officer will inform the 
Department, in a special report, of his reasons for the omission ; and, if the search is 
made, forward the results to the Bureau of Navigation, with track-chart of the trav- 
erses made, soundings taken, &c, and in general fulfilling the conditions indicated 
by the hydrographer in making the examination. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

February 1, 1875. 
The attention of disbursing officers of the Navy is called to the following list of 
offices and banks which have been specially designated, under the act of June 14, 
1866, for the reception, safer keeping, and disbursement of their funds, intrusted to 
them on public account. 



136 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULAR* 



A strict compliance with the provisions of the act referred to will hereafter be 
required from the pay officers of this Department. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



State. 


City. 


Office or Bank. 






U. S. Depository. 




















New Orleans _ 


IT. S. Assistant Treasurer. 




























Santa Fe 


U. S. Depository. 








Buffalo 




Ohio 
















U. S. Depository. 




Erie 




Erie 


Keystone National Bank. 








Norfolk 


Exchange National Bank. 









Circular. 

February 22, 1875. 
Commandants of navy yards and naval stations will direct that no article in the 
different departments will be loaned for the private use of persons or officers residing 
in or out of the yards, except books, which may be loaned a definitely specified time 
upon a requisition approved by the commandant and held by the officer of the depart- 
ment as a receipt, and which will be returned on the return of the book. Delin- 
quencies now existing, or that may hereafter occur, will be reported to the Bureau 
concerned, the article charged to the borrower through it, and such explanations 
demanded as may be proper. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 18. 

March 20, 1875. 
U. S. Navy Regulation Circular No. 6 is hereby so far modified as to provide that 
machinists and other engine-room petty officers are to be given charge of the watches 
in the engine and fire-rooms, under the supervision of the engineer officers, when the 
number of assistant engineers, or graduated cadets, is not sufficient for that duty. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

April 2, 1875. 
In view of the limited number of men allowed the Navy by law, it has become 
necessary to make a reduction in the complement of crews of vessels. 

Commanding officers of vessels are directed to reduce the complement of crew of 
their respective commands according to the list furnished them by the Bureau of 
Equipment and Recruiting. This reduction is to take place as soon as practicable. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 193. 

April 5, 1875. 
General Order No. 153, of April 18, 1870, is hereby annulled. 

When an officer of the Navy, who is entitled to a secretary or a clerk, appoints 
him from civil life and desires him to report for duty at any given place, the Depart- 
ment, if it approves thereof, will issue the requisite order on receiving official notice 
of his appointment and a request for such orders. 

All officers, including secretaries and clerks, serving on board ships in commission, 
will receive orders, which involve traveling expenses, from their commanding officer, 
senior officer present, commander-in-chief, or from the Department, as the case may be. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 137 

Circular relating to the Enlistment of Boys in the U. S. Naval Service. 

April 8, 1875. 

A limited number of boys between the ages of sixteen and seventeen years will be 
enlisted under the provisions of the following acts of Congress, viz., Revised Statutes 
of the United States : 

Section 1418. Boys between the ages of 16 and 18 years may be enlisted to serve 
in the Navy until they shall arrive at the age of 21 years, &c, &c. 

Section 1419. Minors between the ages of 16 and 18 years shall not be enlisted for 
the naval service without the consent of their parents or guardians. 

Section 1420. No minor under the age of 16 years, no insane or intoxicated person, 
and no deserter from the naval or military service of the United States shall be 
enlisted in the naval service. 

These boys will be sent on board the flag-ship " Minnesota," at New York, to be 
trained for the naval service, under the following regulations: 

Every boy previous to being enlisted must satisfy the examining board of ofiicers — 

1st. That he is of robust frame, intelligent, of perfectly sound and healthy consti- 
tution, free from any physical defects or malformation, and not subject to fits. 

2d. That he is able to read and write. 

In special cases, where the boy shows a general intelligence and is otherwise quali- 
fied, the examining board, if they think fit, may enlist him, notwithstanding his 
knowledge of reading and writing is imperfect. 

3d. That he is of proper age. 

4th. That his height and measure are sufficient, being, for a boy of 16 years of age, 
5 feet and 1 inch without shoes, and 30 inches around the chest. 

Boys, however, who do not quite reach this standard of height and measurement 
may be enlisted by special order of the Navy Department, if in all other respects 
desirable. 

Each boy must also bring with him a certificate or declaration, made by his parents 
or guardian, as to his age, and also their consent in writing to his entering the Navy, 
and engaging to serve until he shall have reached 21 years of age. 

The board of examining ofiicers will consist of the captain, a line officer, and the 
senior medical officer of the vessel. 

If the examining officers are of the opinion that the boy is in every respect fit for 
the service, the engagement to serve continuously in the service until 21 years of age 
is' to be read and explained to him, and if he voluntarily* agrees to its terms, he is 
then, in the presence of a witness, to sign the agreement and be enlisted. 

The examining officers will fill up the form and certificate attached to the engage- 
ment and transmit it to the Department. 

The education of the boys will comprise only the elements of an English education, 
alternating with practical seamanship and other professional occupations designed 
to prepare them for sailors in the Navy. 

The boys will be enlisted as second-class boys, at the rate of $10.50 per month and 
one ration. While serving on the "Minnesota" they may, if deserving, be promoted 
to the rating of first-class boys, and on sea-going vessels will be entitled to higher 
ratings, at the discretion of their commanding officers, as a reward of proficiency and 
good conduct. 

In the enlistment of boys preference will be given to the sons of old sailors and 
soldiers. 

Boys on being enlisted will be furnished an outfit of clothing, the cost of which 
will be charged to their respective accounts, or, if the parents so elect, they may pur- 
chase the necessary outfit from the paymaster of the ship themselves and give to 
their sons. 

Boys enlisted to serve until 21 years of age will not be permitted to allot any part 
of their pay to parents or guardians, nor will they be allowed to draw any money 
from the paymaster for this purpose. 

Boys will be allowed to draw monthly, from the paymaster of the ship, one dollar 
for pocket-money, if they are out of debt, and will be allowed liberty to go on shore, 
at the discretion of the commanding officer. 

Boys will be transferred to sea-going vessels on reaching 18 years of age, accom- 
panied by the recommendation of their commanding officer as to their conduct and 
proficiency. 

Boys who may be recommended for honorable discharge upon the expiration of 
their enlistments will receive continuous-service certificates, which will entitle them 
to three months' extra pay of their rating when discharged, and to the addition of 
one dollar per month to their pay provided they re-enlist under such certificates for 
three years within three months from the dates thereof. 

Boys will not be discharged from the service until they have reached 21 years of 
age, except upon a medical survey or for misconduct. 

Boys injured in the service, or having contracted a disease in the line of duty, will 
be entitled to the benefits of a pension. 



138 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

These boys will be under the immediate supervision of the Bureau of Equipment 
and Kecruiting, Navy Department, and applications for enlistment will be made to 
the chief of that Bureau, or to the commanding officer of the flag-ship " Minnesota," 
at New York. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular relating to Bills of Exchange. 

April 12, 1875. 

1. When a pay officer is ordered to a vessel going to or already on a foreign station, 
it becomes his duty before leaving the United States to make written application to 
the Secretary of the Navy for authority to draw bills of exchange to supply himself 
with funds for disbursement during his cruise. No pay officer will draw bills with- 
out such express authority, and if not a fleet paymaster, only in cases of absolute 
necessity, and when absent from that officer. 

2. When such authority is granted the pay officer will be duly notified by the Sec- 
retary, who will also direct the Paymaster General to forward to him a book contain- 
ing blank sets of bills, with a sufficient supply of paymaster's forms, numbers 18, 19, 
and 20, for the letters of advice and accounts of sale. 

3. The bills will be kept in the pay officer's exclusive possession, and all remaining 
at the end of the cruise will be returned immediately to the Paymaster General, with 
a letter stating the exact number of blank sets. If relieved during the cruise, he 
will take a receipt from bis successor, and make a similar report to the Paymaster 
General. 

4. Immediately upon receiving authority to draw bills, the pay officer must forward 
to the Secretary of the Navy specimens of the official signatures, on a separate blank 
sheet, of himself and of the commanding officer in whose name he is required to draw, 
to be transmitted by the" Secretary to the foreign agents of the Department. 

5. Bills must invariably be made payable to the order of the commander-in-chief 
of the station if the vessel is a flag-ship, or of the commanding officer of the vessel 
if otherwise; and his indorsement on the bills is taken as his approval of the pay 
officer's act in drawing them. 

6. When a pay officer needs funds for which he will have to draw exchange, he will 
inform the indorsing officer of the fact, and upon receiving his sanction for the 
amount, he will, before selling his bills, make such diligent inquiry of bankers, mer- 
chants or others, or by inviting bids, as will enable him to negotiate them upon the 
best terms as to rates, kind of money, and their time and place of payment. 

7. Bills will be drawn either upon the foreign financial agents of the Navy Depart- 
ment or upon the Secretary of the Navy, and also at such time after sight as may be 
most advantageous to the Government, and as many different sets may be drawn to 
make up the whole sum required as may be most easily negotiated, or as the pur- 
chaser or purchasers may request for their accommodation. 

8. Before leaving a port the pay officer should fully inform himself of the probable 
course of exchange and facilities for drawing in the places he expects to visit, and 
also as to the coins usually current there, so that he may know when and where to 
draw most favorably, and may avoid, as far as possible, taking away from a port, 
either at home or abroad, coin which can only be used elsewhere at a disadvantage. 

9. Immediately after negotiating any bill of exchange the pay officer is required 
to transmit to the Secretary of the Navy letters of advice, according to form 18, of 
which the original (so marked) is to be forwarded through the proper channels by 
the earliest opportunity, and the duplicate (also marked) similarly forwarded by the 
next succeeding mail. When the bills are drawn upon the Secretary, a triplicate 
letter should also accompany each different set. 

10. Whenever bills are drawn upon the foreign agents, letters of advice to them, 
according to form 19, must also be made in duplicate for each set, of which the orig- 
inal is to accompany the bills, and the duplicate to be sent direct by the earliest 
opportunity. 

11. For each series of bills an account of sale and letter of advice, according to 
form 20, must be forwarded to the Fourth Auditor as soon as the bills are negotiated, 
and the account of sale must include the certificate of two respectable merchants 
resident at the place where the bills were sold, stating the current rates of exchange 
at that time upon London and New York, and in what money payable. 

12. Unless otherwise especially directed, all bills of exchange must be drawn under 
the appropriation for ' ' Pay of the Navy " for the current fiscal year. 

13. The following instructions, suggested by the accounting officers of the Treasury,. 
as to the proper mode of accounting for and paying out the proceeds of bills of 
exchange, will hereafter be strictly observed by the pay officers of the Navy. 

14. When bills are made payable in United States money, or are sold for such other- 
wise than at par, the entries in the cash accounts should be so made as to show not 
only the net amount actually received by the pay officer, but also the face value, and. 
premium obtained or discount charged thereon. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 139 

Examples. — First. "Proceeds of bill No. 10 for $10,000, U. S. coin, at 5 per cent, 
premium = $10,500." 

Second. "Proceeds of bill No. 12 for $10,000, U. S. coin, at 3 per cent, discount = 

$9,700." 

15. When bills are drawn, or tlie proceeds thereof are received in foreign money, 
the entries in the cash accounts should show the amount and kind of money drawn 
for. and the amount and kind of money received, both at its local current value as 
to the money drawn for, and its legal value in United States money, as thus: 

"Proceeds of bill No. 20 for £1,000 0s. 0(7., sterling, received in francs at fir. 24.85 
per £ = 21.850 francs at 19-, 5 , r cts. = $4,796.05." 

16. The legal value in United States money of the standard foreign coins is required 
by law to be annually proclaimed by the Secretary of the Treasury on the first day 
of January, and pay officers are hereby required to keep themselves supplied, by 
timely application to the Fourth Auditor, with the official circulars containing this 
information. 

17. All foreign coins received will be charged to and paid out by pay officers at the 
legal valuation thus fixed, without regard to its local valuation where received or 
paid out. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of tlie Navy. 

Circular. 

May 28, 1875. 
Sir : The instructions contained in printed letter, addressed to you, of the 15th 
November, 1872, are modified, as follows : 

In ordering officers to their domiciles, or when relieving them on "waiting orders," 
the Office of Detail will be guided by the following considerations : 

Officers who have been three years attached to a sea-going vessel will be, on their 
detachment, ordered to their domiciles. If on duty on a sea-going vessel for a less 
time, or if detached after any length of service from other than sea duty, they will 
not be ordered to their domiciles, unless they be on a foreign station or at Key West, 
in which cases, if detached without their application, before the usual period, they 
will be ordered to their domiciles. 

Officers "on duty," or "on leave or waiting orders," ordered as members of, or wit- 
nesses to, a court-martial, or on some other temporary duty, will, on its completion, 
be ordered, as the case may be, either to resume their duties or return to their domi- 
ciles. 

Eespectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of tlie Navy. 
Commodore Daxiel Ammbn, U. S. N., 

Chief of Bureau of Navigation, Navy Department. 



General Order, No. 194. 

August 2, 1875. 

"Commanding officers of vessels of war, and of naval stations, shall take prece- 
dence over all officers placed under their command ; and the Secretary of the Navy- 
may, in his discretion, detail a line officer to act as aid or executive of the command- 
ing officer of a vessel of war, or naval station, which officer shall, when not impracti- 
cable, be next in rank to said commanding officer, and who, as such aid or executive, 
shall, while executing the orders of the commanding officer on board such ship, or 
at such station, take precedence over all officers attached to such vessel or station; 
and all orders of such aid or executive shall be regarded as proceeding from the com- 
manding officer, and such aid or executive shall have no independent authority in 
consequence of such detail." 

" Staff officers, senior to the officer so detailed, shall have the right to communicate 
directly with the commanding officer." 

"In processions on shore, on courts-martial, summary courts, courts of inquiry, 
boards of survey, and all other boards, line and staff officers shall take precedence 
according to rank." 

The foregoing are provisions of the statute law of the country. In view of the 
fact that their meaning and force have been sometimes misunderstood, they are 
republished for the information of the service, with the following declarations and 
regulations, promulgated as the views of the Nayy Department upon the subject- 
matter, and its official construction of the law, as it exists, in relation thereto. 

Sank — Command. 
By the force of naval law, and regulations made in conformity therewith, the fol- 
lowing principles are established and exist, as essentials of all military service, with- 
out which there can be neither command, discipline, nor responsibility. 



140 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



the command or direction of any military expedition or duty, whatever their rank, 
must, while properly in such command or direction, have full command, authority, 
and precedence over all officers and persons, of whatever rank, serving in such vessel, 
station, or expedition, or in the execution of such duty. This authority and prece- 
dence will descend to the officer or person on whom such command or direction may 
devolve, by reason of the death, disability, or absence of the person otherwise in 
command or direction. 

II. In case of the death, disability, or absence of an officer in military command or 
direction, this command and direction, with all its authority and precedence, devolves 
&nd rests upon the line officer next in rank who may be present. The direction of all 
courts and boards, and precedence thereon, and in all processions on shore, will 
devolve upon the officer next in rank who may be present, without regard to the 
corps to which he belongs. 

III. Officers of the staff-corps of the Navy will, on all occasions, be treated with 
the same respect as officers of corresponding rank in the line, not in command, under 
like circumstances. Their legal rank carries with it the same personal dignity, and 
is to receive, in all respects, the same consideration. If they are at any time sub- 
ordinated, for any purpose of organization or duty, to the exercise of authority dele- 
gated by law to their juniors in actual or relative rank, it is for reasons growing out 
of the necessities of military service, operating alike on all officers of both line and 
staff under like circumstances, and subject to the same conditions applicable to all. 
The right of military command and to additional quarters is restricted by law. 

IV. No officer of any grade of the Navy is authorized, by virtue of his own mere 
rank and authority, to give any order or grant any privilege, permission, or liberty 
to his senior in rank of any corps ; nor is any senior officer required to receive such 
order, privilege, permission, or liberty from his junior, unless such junior is at the 
time in command of the vessel-of-war or naval station to which the senior is attached, 
or in command or direction of the military expedition or duty on which such senior 
is serving ; and no commanding officer is authorized to delegate to any junior the 
authority to grant any permission, privilege, or liberty to his senior, but must him- 
self receive and hear, under proper regulations, any request therefor from such senior, 
satisfying himself as to its propriety, and deciding the matter in the exercise of his 
own authority. Any officer on shipboard, however, who is entrusted, by general pro- 
vision or special order of proper authority, with any duty, the present performance 
of which may involve the movements of the ship itself, or the attitude of the ship's 
company as a whole, represents the commandant for that purpose, and is entrusted, 
for the time, with all the authority necessary for the proper performance of such 
duty; and all officers, of whatever rank, are required to assist in carrying out such 
duty, and to receive and execute his orders for that purpose; nor will he be inter- 
fered with therein, unless by the commandant, or the officer next in command, who 
is entitled to relieve him in the performance of such duty. 

Aid or Executive of the Commanding Officer. 

The efficiency of every military organization requires of the commanding authority, 
besides the general duties of command and direction, the additional duties of organi- 
zation, police, and inspection; all these appertain to, and go with the command. 
For the relief of the commanding officer they are usually entrusted, in their details, 
to subordinates, but they are performed by his authority and under his direction. 
On shipboard, the Secretary of the Navy, by authority of law, designates the senior 
line officer to perform these duties, in addition to the ordinary duties assigned to him 
as such line officer attached to the ship. The officer so designated is called, for the 
time being, the "aid or executive of the commanding officer." This is not a new 
rank; nor has the officer, by virtue of the title, or in consequence of the detail, any 
new "independent authority." It is merely a designation of the officer who, for the 
relief of the commandant, and by his authority alone, carries out, on board the ship, 
the details of organization, inspection, and police; duties corresponding to those which, 
in the Army, are performed by the adjutants, inspectors, and. officers of the day. 

I. As the officer in charge of the police of the ship, and the execution of all provi- 
sions made for her general good condition, appearance, and safety, his duties are 
constant, and call him everywhere, and give him, as representative of the command- 
ant for that purpose, charge of, and authority over, the details necessary to the 
proper performance of all police duties. To this authority all officers and persons 
are required to yield full and prompt acquiescence. 

II. As the inspecting officer of the ship, required at stated periods to examine and 
report her general condition and efficiency in all her departments, he is entitled to 
make personal examination of and report upon all these, and, for that purpose, every 
facility is to be afforded him by every officer of every department. The reports of 
the heads of departments are made to the commanding officer. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 141 

III. As the officer to whom the details of the organization of the ship's company 
arc entrusted, he is the proper person to station the officers and crew, and to prepare, 
form, parade, arid present them in proper attitude for review and inspection by the 
commandant or other proper officer; and fortius purpose he has authority to take 
preliminary charge of all formations and parades, to see that the whole is properly 
organized and paraded, and to receive the reports of every part and transmit them 
as a whole. 

IV. These duties of organization, inspection, and police devolve upon the "aid or 
executive of the commanding officer of a vessel-of-war," by virtue of his detail as 
such "aid or executive," and they, and the exercise of the authority necessary to 
execute them, are recognized by all military law and usage, and by the statute which 
authorizes his designation. But they are duties pertaining to the command dele- 
gated, under sanction of law, by the commanding officer to his "aid or executive," 
who. in carrying them out, is "executing the orders of the commanding officer;" 
and the authority exercised as necessary to their execution is the authority of "the 
commanding officer," exercised by his "aid or executive," and not the authority of 
the "aid or executive" himself. By the express provision of the statute, this officer 
has "no independent authority" as such "aid or executive," but exercises only the 
authority necessarily delegated for the execution "of the orders of the commanding 
officer." This delegated authority, however, is recognized by the statute which con- 
fers on the "aid or executive," while exercising it, "precedence over all officers 
attached to the ship," of whatever rank or corps. But this special precedence is 
given to him only "while executing the orders of the commanding officer on board 
ship," and is not his under other circumstances. 

V. The officer in command of a ship-of-war is not authorized to delegate his power, 
except for the carrying out of the details of the general duties to be performed by 
his authority. The command is his, and he can neither delegate the duties of it to 
another, nor avoid its burdens, nor escape its responsibilities; and his "aid or execu- 
tive," in the exercise of the power given to him for " executing the orders of the com- 
manding officer," must keep himself constantly informed of the commander's opinions 
and wishes thereon; and whenever, and as soon as he maybe uninformed or in doubt 
as to such opinions or wishes, he must remedy such defect by prompt and personal 
application, to the end that the authority of the commandant may be used only to 
carry out his own views; and that he may not be, by its unwarranted exercise, in 
any measure relieved from his official responsibilities, which can neither be assumed 
by nor fall upon any other officer. 

VI. The details of these duties may be more fully defined by general or special 
orders and regulations, but the "aid or executive of the commanding officer of a 
vessel-of-war" has, as such "aid or executive," no other duties or authority except 
those which come within the scope of the above descriptions ; and any other author- 
ity at any time to be exercised by the officer designated as such "aid or executive" 
must be such authority only as belongs to him by virtue of his rank in the line. 
This is his, in his own right, with all the power and precedence which belong to it, 
but it is to be exercised only according to the general rules governing alike all officers 
of all corps and every grade. 

VII. It is not necessary, nor consistent with military usage and efficiency, that 
the "aid or executive" should be required to announce with every order given, or 
authority exercised by him as such, that he is "executing the orders of the com- 
manding officer." The delegated character of this authority is fully understood, 
and is defined by the statute, which contemplates obedience to it as such by "all 
officers attached to the vessel;" and the statute, while it provides that the officer 
detailed to act as "aid or executive/' shall, "when not impracticable, be next in rank 
to the commanding officer," still contemplates the same obedience when this is im- 
practicable. But orders to seniors not given in the ordinary progress of military 
organization or duty are to be so announced. 

VIII. Any complaint or appeal growing out of the exercise of these duties should 
be made to the commanding officer, and the right to make any such complaint or 
appeal will not be denied to any one. 

IX. The right of all officers, whether of the line or staff, senior to the officer detailed 
as "aid or executive," to communicate with the commanding officer at all proper 
times and places, is not to be denied nor restricted; but this does not interfere with 
the duty of all such officers to recognize and acquiesce in the authority delegated to 
the "aid or executive" for the purpose of police, organization, and inspection as 
aforesaid, nor confer upon any such officer the right to interrupt the ordinary course 
of military organization or duty, while in actual execution, for the purpose of making 
such communication. Every officer in charge of a department has, of course, the 
general right, at all proper times, to communicate and confer directly with the 
responsible commanding officer concerning any matter relating to his department ; 
and his duty to do so is absolute whenever he thinks it necessary for the good of his, 
department or of the service. 



142 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

X. All orders and regulations inconsistent with these provisions are hereby abro- 
gated to the extent that they are so inconsistent, and the Revised Regulations will 
conform to them in all respects. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

August 10, 1875. 

When prisoners under sentences of courts-martial are delivered or received at a 
navy yard or station, and the commandant has received no instructions respecting 
the disposition to be made of them, he will, without delay, report the case to the 
Department. 

No sentence of a general court-martial, requiring the action of the Department, 
will be carried into effect without instructions from it, otherwise than by the simple 
confinement of the prisoner until such instructions have been received. 

DANIEL AMMEN, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 195. 

September 20, 1875. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened on board the U. S. flag-ship Richmond, 
in the harbor of Callao, Peru, June 30, 1875, by order of the commander-in-chief of 
the U. S. naval forces on the South Pacific Station, Assistant Paymaster James A. 
King was tried on the following charges : 

Charge I. — "Absence without leave, or after the expiration of leave." 
Charge II. — "Disobedience of the lawful orders of, and disrespect to, his superior 

officer." 
Charge III. — "Drunkenness." 

Charge IV. — "Making a false statement, thereby deceiving his commanding officer." 
Charge V. — "Violation of 'An act to regulate arid secure the safe-keeping of public 
money intrusted to disbursing officers of the United States.' — Approved June 
fourteen, eighteen hundred and sixty-six." 

Of which charges the Court found that the accused of the first charge was " Guilty 
by plea ; " of the second charge, " Guilty in a less degree than charged, viz : Guilty of 
disobedience of lawful orders of, but not guilty of disrespect to, his superior officer; " 
of the third charge, "Not guilty;" of the fourth charge, "Guilty by plea;" and of 
the fifth charge, "Not guilty." And the said Assistant Paymaster James A. Ring 
was sentenced — 

"To be suspended from duty for the term of six (6) months; to receive one-half 
the sea-pay of his grade during that time, and to be publicly reprimanded by the 
Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

Which sentence was approved by the officer who ordered the Court. 

In carrying into execution that part of the sentence of the Court which requires 
that Assistant Paymaster Ring be publicly reprimanded by the Secretary of the Navy, 
little more is considered necessary than to promulgate, in this General Order, the 
charges, with the findings and sentence of the Court ; which order will be read at all 
naval stations of the United States and on board all ships in commission. Any officer 
having a proper regard for his reputation and standing in the service would feel such 
promulgation as in itself a poignant reprimand. . 

J. C. HOWELL, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 196. 

December 15, 1875. 

I. Section 138, Chapter IV, of the "Orders, Regulations, and Instructions for the 
Administration of Law and Justice in the United States Navy," promulgated April 
15, 1870, is hereby modified so as to read as follows, viz: 

No person in the Navy shall be tried and sentenced by a court-martial for any 
crime or offense which shall appear to have been known to the authority convening 
the Court three years before the issuing of the order convening the Court. 

II. Whenever any person, convicted by court-martial, shall be sentenced for any 
period exceeding ten days to confinement on diminished rations, or on bread and 
water, there must appear on the face of the record of the proceedings the certificate 
of the senior medical officer present, to the effect that such sentence will not be seri- 
ously injurious to the health of the accused. 

III. In every sentence of confinement with loss of pay and dismissal from the serv- 
ice, it must be provided that a sum not less than twenty dollars shall be paid to the 
offender on his discharge from imprisonment. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 143 

General Order, No. 197. 

December 24, 1875. 

Hereafter it shall be the duty of the commanding officer of every vessel of the Navy 
to appoint a board, consisting of at least three officers attached to the ship, whose 
duty it shall be to inform themselves, as fully as possible, of the previous naval his- 
tory of the general-service men of the ship, and their general character, ability and 
fitness, and to make recommendations, signed by themselves and entered upon the 
log-book of the ship, as to the ratings of the general-service men ; and the ratings 
and disratings of general-service men shall be made by the commanding officer in 
view of such recommendation; and when, in his opinion, it shall be for the interests 
or discipline of the service to disregard such recommendation in any particular case, 
or to rate or disrate any man, independently of or contrary to the same, he shall 
enter the fact, together with his reasons for acting in disregard of such recommen- 
dation, upon the log-book of the ship, over his own signature. 

This order supersedes the circular of the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting 
dated October 6, 1875. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



No. 198. 

January 6, 1876. 

For various reasons, involving past usages and services, and for the convenience 
of distinguishing the relative rank of officers of the same grade, the Department has 
determined to restore the flag of the Secretary of the Navy, of the Admiral, of the 
Vice-Admiral, of Rear Admiral of blue, red, and white, and the pendant of Commo- 
dore of blue, red, and white. 

The patterns will be those in use prior to, and changed on, January 1, 1870. 
The execution of this order will take effect on July 4, 1876. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 199. 

January 10, 1876. 
A commanding officer of a vessel-of-war when relieved on a foreign station will 
transfer his clerk to the officer relieving him, when desired by his relief and agree- 
able to the clerk. Should such transfer, on these conditions, be not effected, the 
clerk of the officer relieved will be ordered to his home, but in no case will trans- 
portation be furnished or paid for to any one going abroad to take his place. The 
commanding officer entitled to a clerk may appoint one present on the station, if a 
fit person to perform the duties can be found. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 200. 

January 17, 1876. 
General Order, No. 92, dated March 11, 1869, which forbids the practice of covering 
the berth-decks of vessels-of-war with shellac, is hereby revoked. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 201. 

January 18, 1876. 
The Department is gratified to publish in a general order the following commenda- 
tory report from Commander A. P. Cooke, commanding U. S. S. Swatara, relative to 
the gallant conduct of Michael Deneef, captain of top, on board of that ship. 

Such an exhibition of gallantry and presence of mind deserves and receives the 
warmest appreciation of the Department. 

A medal of honor will be awarded to Michael Deneef for his efforts in saving human 
life. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. S. Swatara (Third Rate), 
Port Royal, South Carolina, December 28, 1875. 

Sir : I have the honor to call to your attention the gallant conduct of Michael Deneef (C. T.) of this vessel. 

On the morning of December 1, while at anchor in the harbor of Para, the dinghy, riding at the port-boom, 
capsized and got loose from her moorings, and the very strong flood-tide (about four knots an hour) swept the 
boat rapidly astern. One of the crew of the dinghy continued to cling to her, but from his fright, or from 
accident, lost his hold, from which moment his life was much in peril. As soon as the danger became apparent, 
and before a boat could possibly be manned, Deneef jumped overboard from the port gang-way, and, from his 
presence of mind and physical strength, succeeded in getting his shipmate on to the dinghy, and kept him there 
until assistance from the ship could be rendered, and both men were taken into a cutter. * 



144 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

I am glad to say that this act of gallantry is in perfect keeping with Deneef's habitual seaman-like bearing. 
He is an American, formerly an apprentice boy, and probably the finest seaman in the ship. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. P. COOKE, 
Forwarded : Commander Commanding. 

A. W. Weaver, 
Commander, Senior Officer present. 
Hon. Geo. M. Robeson, 

Secretary of the Navy, 

Washington, D. C. 



General Order, No. 202. 

January 20, 1876. 
The following change has been adopted in the uniform of the enlisted men, of aLE 
grades, in the Navy; and commanding officers of vessels are directed to have the 
alteration made by the men themselves. 

Three stripes of tape, to be three-sixteenths of an inch wide, one-quarter of an inch 
apart, and laid on one-quarter of an inch from the edge of the collar of the frock r 
with a three-quarter inch white star in each corner thereof. When new clothing is. 
contracted for, or made up by the men, the collar of the frock, which is now six and 
one-half inches deep, should be increased to nine inches. The different ratings of 
the men are to be indicated by the stripes on the cuffs. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 203. 

January 31, 1876. 
On board of all vessels of the Navy having three or less than three watch officers 
on duty, the navigation officer shall keep a regular night watch, or be assigned to a 
particular night watch, at the option of the commanding officer. 

At sea, during daylight, the deck may be left in charge of a junior line officer — 
the executive officer, or the officer whose regular watch it may be, remaining on 
deck and being directly responsible for the junior in charge. 
The log will be signed by the regular officer of the watch. 

Junior officers shall be afforded frequent opportunities to tack and wear ship, to 
reef, and make and shorten sail. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 204. 

February 9, 1876. 

The Department has noticed, with regret, the frequency of punishments inflicted 
upon the enlisted men on board of some of the ships now in commission- — no one 
punishment, perhaps, exceeding the law, but some commanding officers, taking ad- 
vantage of the law, inflict punishment for slight offences so frequently as to harrass 
the men and create discontent, without adding to the efficiency of their ships or to 
the maintenance of discipline. 

The Department, without taking more decided action at present, would suggest to 
commanding officers to try the experiment of forbearance and consideration for the 
feelings of the men, and endeavor to induce cheerful obedience by granting indul- 
gences, instead of coercing reluctant obedience through fear of punishment. 

If these means fail, then they can resort to punishment, for the Department does 
not desire nor intend that the efficiency of the Navy shall be impaired by any undue 
leniency, nor will it sanction any willful disregard of law or disrespect to authority. 

GEO. M. EOBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 205. 

February 11, 1876. 

The service is reminded that the rank of all officers is established by the statute 
law of the country, and that the rank of officers of the staff corps, as fixed by law, 
is derived from the same authority as that fixed by law for the officers of the line ; 
therefore on all occasions of official courtesy, where it is customary to interchange 
personal salutes, it is the duty of the junior in rank to first salute his senior, whether 
of the line or staff, provided, however, that the officer actually in command of the 
ship is entitled to the respect due to that position, whatever may be his rank or 
seniority. 

Hereafter on board of all vessels of the Navy on all occasions of general muster, 
inspections, quarters, reviews, and like occasions and ceremonies, the officer at the 
time in actual command of the ship shall himself be present, and he shall receive in 
person, as commanding officer, the reports customary on such occasions direct from 
the heads of departments and officers of divisions. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 145 

All commissioned officers of the Navy attached to a vessel-of-war, when desiring 
leave from the ship, shall obtain the required permission from the commanding offi- 
cer, and upon their return report the same to him through the officer of the deck. 

Officers senior in rank to the aid or executive are not required to inform the aid or 
executive of their departure from or their return to the ship; this is the duty of the 
officer of the deck, who will communicate such information to the aid or executive. 

All orders and regulations of the Navy inconsistent with this order are hereby 
abrogated to the extent they are so incon consistent. 

GEO. M.ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 206. 

February 15, 1876. 
Medals of honor will be awarded to John Handran, seaman, and Edward Maddin, 
ordinary seaman, for the gallant conduct displayed by them in saving human life, as 
per the following commendatorv report from Captain S. R. Franklin, commanding 
theU. S. S. " Franklin." 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Flagship Franklin, 

Lisbon, Portugal, January 19, 1876. 
Sin : 1 have the honor to bring to the notice of the Department the gallant conduct of John Handran, seaman, 
and Edward Maddin, ordinary seaman, which was displayed under the following circumstances : 

On the morning of the 9th instant, Henry 0. Neil, landsman, fell overboard from the lower boom of this 
vessel while a strong tide was running, and would probably have been drowned had it not been for the timely 
assistance of the men above named, who instantly sprang into the water and sustained him until a boat was 
sent to their assistance. 

I would state in this connection that John Handran, seaman, has displayed the same sort of gallantry on 
several occasions. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

S. R. Franklin, 

Captain Commanding. 
Hon. Geo. M. Robeson, 

Secretary of the Navy, 

Washington, D. C. 



General Order, No. 207. 

March 23, 1876. 
Medals of honor will be awarded to Albert Weisbogel, captain of mizzen-top, and 
Richard Ryan, ordinary seaman, for the gallant conduct displayed by them in 
saving human life, as per the following commendatory reports from Lieut. Com- 
mander Joshua Bishop, Executive Officer of the U. S. S. " Plymouth," and Captain 
S. B. Luce, commanding the U. S. Flagship " Hartford. 7 ' 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. S. Plymouth, (Second Rate,) 

Hampton Roads, Va., February 26, 1876. 
Sir : I respectfully present for your consideration the following facts, of which I am personally cognizant in 
the case of Albert Weisbogel, captain of mizzen-top, now serving on board this vessel : 

That while serving on board the U. S. S. "Benicia," he, Weisbogel, jumped overboard and succeeded in sav- 
ing a marine by the name of Wolf, who had, while laboring under a fit of insanity, attempted to commit sui- 
cide by drowning. 

I know that Rear Admiral Almy instructed Captain Hopkins to present this case to the Department with a 
recommendation for a gallant-conduct medal, and also that, by admission of Captain S. B. Luce, he had per- 
formed a like gallant feat while serving on board the U. S. S. "Juniata." 

By my own appreciation of this man's conduct in hard gales of wind on the Pacific ocean, I recommend him 
for a medal. 

Very respectfully, 

JOSHUA BISHOP, 
Lieut. Commander, U. S. Nary, and Executive Officer. 
Capt. Edward Barrett, U. S. N., 

Commanding. 

U. S. Flagship Hartford, 

Norfolk, Va., March 7, 1876. 
Sir : I beg leave to report that during the morning watch on the 4th instant, James Mullen landsman fell 
overboard from one of the forward gun ports on the port side. A strong ebb tide was running' and the man 
unable to swim, was sinking, when Richard Ryan, ordinary seaman, one of the crew of the steam-launch then 
at the port gangway, jumped after Mullen and sustained him until they were rescued by the launch. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. B. LUCE, 
„ „ Captain, V. S. N, Commanding. 

Hon. Geo. M. Robeson, 

Secretary of the Nary, 

Washington, D. C. ■ 

10 



146 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



-General Order, No. 208. 

April 1, 1876. 
The pay of the crews of receiving ships, and the number of men allowed in each 
rating, will hereafter he in conformity with the following table : 



Ratings. 


Monthly 
pay. 


_, 


d 

_. 

p 
o 
O 


1 
1 

55 

! o> 

A 

s 


! i 
\ ! 

1 * 


si 


ai 
65 

s 
1 

a 








$23. 50 
26.50 
26.50 
26.50 
26.50 
23. 50 
26.50 
26.50 
26.50 
76.50 
21.50 
31.50 
26.00 
21.50 
21.50 
20.50 
21.50 
15.50 


! \ 
I * 

i 

2 
1 


3 
4 

1 

1 

1 2 

\ 


2 
3 
1 

1 
2 
1 
2 
1 


1 

2 
3 

[______ 

-____ 

| 

! : 


2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 


! . 

3 
1 


i 
1 

2 

i 










__ 


Captains of Forecastle 




| 


1 










1 * 


1 




Quarter Gunners 






1 






Sailmakers' Mates 





Machinists 


2 

i 

2 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


2 

* 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

1 


2 
1 
1 

\ 

2 
2 
1 
1 

\ 

1 
1 
1 






! 




Captains of Hold 


r 


1 

1 






1 
1 




r 


_____ 


Assistant Cooks 




i 
i 

1 


1 
1 

1 


I 

1 























1 


1 


Coopers — 




______ 

i 


1 
1 


______ 


__ 
1 




Ships' Yeomen 

Engineers' Yeomen 


__ 






i 
i 
i 


1 
1 
1 

2 

1 


i 
i 

i 


_____ 

1 

1 








__ 
1 






Schoolmasters 


36.50 
31.50 
26.50 
23.50 
20. 50 , 
23.50 ! 
36. 50 ! 
31. 50 
81. 50 
26. 50 
21.50 
19. 50 | 
31.50 I 
19.50 ! 
17.50 
15. 50 
21. 50 i 
17.50 i 
41. 50 
36. 50 1 
31. 50 
19.50 ! 
51. 50 j 
36. 50 ! 
31. 50 | 


Ships' Writers 

Ships' Printers __ 


2 
1 
1 


2 
1 
1 


1 


i 


i 





1 


Ships' Tailors 


1 




1 

1 








Ships' Bakers 








Painters, 2d class 


1 

! 

i 

1 ! 
1 1 
1 i 
6 I 

8 1 

16 ! 

8 i 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 ' 
1 : 

l\ 

16 ! 
8 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
8 
16 
6 












i 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

2 
2 
4 

2 

1 


1 

1 | 
1 

1 1 
1 | 
1 
1 

7 I 
6 i 

8 ! 

2 

1 

1 ! 


i, 

l 

l 

l 

1 ! 
1 

2 ' 
2 i 

14 
______ 

1 i 

l ! 

l ; 

__-.. 

l\ 


1 

1 

- __ 

______ 

! 

" 1 ' 
2 | 
5 ! 

1 

i < 

1 1 


1 
1 
1 
1 






Wardroom Cooks ! 






Bugler [ 

Seamen 

Ordinary Seamen 1 


_____ 




Ordinary Seamen, E. E.__ _ _ | 






- 


1 

1 


1 
1 


1 

1 


Cook to Commander-in-Chief 

Coxswain to Commander-in-Chief ! 


Carpenter. _ __ _ _ ' 


8 


, 


_____ 

7 
8 


_.__. 

7 
8 


-- 

7 
8 1 


— I- 


__ 








Second-class Musicians _[ 









The pay of master-at-arms and ships' and engineers' yeomen on receiving ships at 
Brooklyn and Charlestown is $61.50 per month, at Philadelphia $56.50 per month, 
and on other receiving ships $51.50 per month. 

First class paymasters' yeomen allowed to all receiving ships. 

First class apothecaries allowed to receiving ships at Boston, New York, and Nor- 
folk, all others allowed second class apothecaries. 

Paymasters' yeomen and apothecaries will be allowed $1.50 per month additional 
as heretofore. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretcu-y of the Navy. 



Circular. 

May 3, 1876. 
Officers of the Navy who are invited and officially attend the opening of the Cen- 
tennial Exhibition at Philadelphia on May 10th will wear undress uniform, with 
sword, epaulettes, and cap. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 147 

General Order, No. 209. May 20, 1876. 

At a Naval General Court-Martial recently convened at the navy yard, Washington, 
D. C, Lieut. Commander Joseph B. Coghlan was tried on the following charges and 
specifications, viz: 

Charges and specifications of charges preferred by the Secretary of the Navy 
against Joseph B. Coghlan, a lieutenant commander in the United States Navy: 
Charge I. — "Conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman." 

Specification — In this: that Joseph B. Coghlan, then and now a lieutenant commander 
in the Navy of the United States, did, at Port Royal, South Carolina, on or 
about the fourteenth day of April current, having written and subscribed a 
profane, scurrilous, and ungentlemanly letter to William P. Moran, a clerk in 
the Navy Department, forward said letter by mail to said Moran, addressed to 
him as "William P. Moran, Clerk, Bureau of Navigation, Washington, D. C," 
in violation of his duty as a gentleman, and of the laws of decency, decorum, 
and morality, which are incumbent upon every officer in the naval service. 
Charge II. — "Scandalous conduct, tending to the destruction of good morals." 
Specification — In this: that Joseph B. Coghlan, then and now a lieutenant commander 
in the Navy of the United States, did, at Port Royal, South Carolina, on or 
about April fourteenth, A. D. eighteen hundred and seventy-six, write, sub- 
scribe, address, and forward by mail, to William P. Moran, a clerk in the 
Navy Department at Washington, in the District of Columbia, a profane, 
indecent, scandalous, and threatening letter, in the words and figures following: 
(then follows copy of letter, which it is unnecessary to give,) and did thereby 
violate good morals, and set an evil example to others in like manner to offend. 

Geo. M. Robeson, 
Navy Dept., April 22, 1876. Secretary of the Navy. 

The Court found the specification proven and the accused guilty of the charges, 
and passed sentence, as follows: 

"And the Court do therefore sentence the said Lieut. Commander Joseph B. Coghlan, 
United States Navy, to be suspended from duty for the period of one year; to retain 
his present number on the list of lieutenant commanders for the said time, and to be 
publicly reprimanded in General Orders by the Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

The finding of the Court is approved, and the sentence, though not approved in 
the fullest sense of the word, is confirmed. 

In carrying into execution that part of the sentence which requires that Lieut. 
Commander Coghlan "he reprimanded in General Orders," the Department is con- 
strained, in order that the effect of its reprimand may not be perverted, or the 
younger officers of the Navy be misled by the lenient action of the Court, to state 
its opinion that the punishment awarded is certainly not too severe for the offenses 
found proved. 

Neither the evidence taken by the Court, nor the defense offered by the accused, 
shows any cause or excuse for the violent and vindictive tone and disgraceful lan- 
guage of the letter set forth in the specifications; and the only assignable cause 
appears to be an impression on the part of the writer that orders distasteful to him 
had been issued at the instigation or through the contrivance of the clerk to whom 
the letter is addressed, and were the result of personal considerations and malevolent 
feelings, instead of being, as they were, proper and necessary for the interests of the 
service. 

The accused pleaded no provocation; the Court upon inquiry could find none, and 
the only conceivable motive for the letter is one which not only deprived Lieut. Com- 
mander Coghlan of all claim to the lenient consideration of his case by the Depart- 
ment,. but adds to the disgraceful offenses of "ungentlemanly conduct," and "scan- 
dalous conduct, tending to the destruction of good morals," the grave military 
offense of treating with disrespect and contempt his superior officer, the officer of 
high rank who occupies the position of Chief of the Bureau whence the orders 
emanate, and shows a degree of insubordination which renders the offender unfit for 
the service. 

Lieut. Commander Coghlan will be considered as suspended from this date, in con- 
formity with his sentence. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

General Order, No. 210. Secretary of the Navy. 

June 5, 1876. 
The order of December 30, 1865, dismissing Julius S. Bohrer, Master in the U. S. 
Navy, from the naval service, is hereby declared void, and Mr. Bohrer is hereby, 
under and by virtue of the Revised Statutes of the United States, Title 15, Chapter 
10, Article 37, restored to the Retired List as master. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



148 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 211. 

June 7, 1876. 

I. Before a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the navy yard at New York, 
May 18, 1876, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, dated May 15, 1876, of which 
Court Captain D. B. Harmony, TJ. S. Navy, was president, was arraigned and tried 
Frederick E. Upton, master, U. S. Navy, upon the following charges and specifications: 
Charge I. — "Using provoking and reproachful words towards another person in the 

Navy." 

Specification — In this : that on or about the twenty-seventh day of April, in the year 
eighteen hundred and seventy-six, on board the United States ship Albert, at 
the navy yard at Brooklyn, New York, the said Master Frederick E. Upton, then 
attached to and serving on board said ship, did use provoking and reproachful 
words to David P. Wilson, quartermaster of said ship, and did repeatedly say 
to him, the said Wilson, "God damn you, get up on the poop," and "I can 
hound you every day in the week, and I'll do it." 

Charge II. — "Treating his superior officer with contempt while in the execution of 
his office." 

Specification — In this : that on or about the seventh day of May, in the year eighteen 
hundred and seventy-six, on board the United States ship Alert, then at the 
navy yard at Brooklyn, New York, the said Master Frederick E. Upton, attached 
to and serving on board said ship, and being at the time officer of the deck, 
and while sitting in the cabin of said ship, did, upon being informed by the 
executive officer, Lieutenant Geo. B. Livingston, U. S. Navy, that that was 
not the place for the officer of the deck, and that he should report him to his 
commanding officer, reply, "report and be damned." 

Charge. — "Absence without leave." 

Specification — In this: that on or about the eighth day of May, in the year eighteen 
hundred and seventy-six, the said Master Frederick E. Tipton, then attached to 
and serving on board the United States ship Alert, at the navy yard at 
Brooklyn, New York, did absent himself from that vessel without leave. 

Finding. 
After full and mature consideration of all the evidence adduced, the Court find in 

the case of the accused, Master Frederick E. Upton, of the United States Navy, as 

follows : 
The specification of the first charge proven in part, and the accused guilty of the 

first charge. 

The specification of the second charge proven, and the accused guilty of the 

second charge. 
The specification of the third charge proven, and the accused guilty of the third 

charge. 

Sentence. 

"And the Court do therefore sentence the said Master Frederick E. Upton, of the 
United States Navy, to be suspended from duty and rank for one year, and to be 
reprimanded in General Orders by the Hon. Secretary of the Navy." 
Action of'the Department. 

II. The proceedings and finding of the Court are approved by the Department. 
The sentence also is approved, although reluctantly, because the offenses proved 

would have warranted, and, in the judgment of the Department, demanded, a punish- 
ment far more severe. 

In conformity with his sentence, Master Frederick E. Upton, U. S. Navy, is hereby, 
and from this date, suspended from duty and rank for one year. 

This order and reprimand will be publicly announced and read at all navy yards 
and naval stations, and on board of all naval vessels in commission. 

The Secretary of the Navy deeply regrets that an officer so young in the service as 
Master Upton should have disgraced himself and the Navy of the United States by 
committing the very grave offenses proved against him — offenses whose perpetration 
betrays an ignorance of, or disregard for, the very first and fundamental duties of 
his profession. It is to be hoped that the punishment now visited upon the offender 
may prevent him from again forgetting the respect and courtesy due at all times to 
his superior officers. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 212. 

June 9, 1876. 
The Department is gratified to publish, in a general order, the following commend- 
atory repor g- from Capt-. Edward Barrett, commanding the U. S. S. Plymouth, rel- 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 149 

ative to the gallant conduct of Albert Weisbogel, captain of mizzen top, and Emila 
Lejeune, seaman, and to the good conduct of Gunner William Wilson and Seamen 
William Higgins, of that vessel. 

Such exhibitions of gallantry and presence of mind deserve and receive the warm- 
est appreciation of the Department. 

A medal of honor will be awarded to Albert Weisbogel, being the second which the 
Department has awarded him for his successful efforts in saving human life. Medals 
of honor will also be awarded to Emile Lejeune and William Higgins. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

L'. S. s. Plymouth, (Second Rate,) 
At Sea., oee Haiti, West Indies, May in, 1876. 
Siu : It affords me pleasure to again bring to the notice of the Department the presence of mind and prompt- 
ness of Albert Weisbogel, captain of mizzen top, in endeavoring to save the life of Peter J. Kenny, landsman, 
who had fallen overboard, and was subsequently rescued, while this vessel was entering the harbor of Kingston, 
Jamaica, on the morning of the 27th of April, 1876. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. BARRETT, 
Captain, U. S. A'., and Senior Officer present. 
Hon. GEO. M. Robeson, 

Secretary of the Navy, 

Washington, D. C. — 

(J. S. S. Plymouth, (Second Rate,) 
At Sea, off Saint Domingo, May 19, 1876. 
Sir : I have the honor to report that about 8 p. m. on the evening of the 15th instant, while this ship was 
underway, off Vache Island, south coast of Haiti, James Duncan, seaman, fell overboard. The two life-boats 
were about to be lowered, when the whale-boat's detaching bolt, of the Wood's apparatus, gave way and pre- 
cipitated the boat into the sea, staving her bottom. Two men were in her, the balance of the crew having suc- 
ceeded in reaching the deck. The boat filled with water and floated astern. 

Through the promptness and energy of Gunner William Wilson, who jumped in and took charge of her, the 
second cutter was quickly lowered and went to the rescue. 

I take pleasure in recommending to the notice of the Department Gunner Wilson's conduct. 
I also take pleasure in recommending for a medal of honor William Higgins, seaman, who on the occasion 
referred to was the first to lower the balsa, and to row her off in the direction of the whale-boat, and rescuing one 
of the men from the sinking boat. Higgins is an efficient and cool man, always ready for an emergency. 

I am happy to state that there was no Toss of life, but the whale-boat had to be cut adrift and the life-buoy was 
lost. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

E. BARRETT, 
Captain, U. S. A*., Commanding V. S. S. Plymouth. 
Hon. Geo. M. Robeson, 

Secretary of the Navy, 

Washington, D. C. — 

U. S. S. Plymouth, (Second Rate,) 
Harbor of Port Royal, S. C, Jiine 7, 1876. 
Sir : 1 take pleasure in bringing to the notice of the Department the gallant conduct of Emile Lejeune, sea- 
man, serving on board this ship, who, on the 6th instant, while on shore, as one of the crew of the steam 
launch of this ship, rescued a citizen from drowning, who had fallen off the steamer wharf at Port Royal, 
South Carolina. 

I respectfully recommend Lejeune to the Department for a medal of honor. 
Very respectful 1 v. your obedient servant, 

E. BARRETT, 
Captain, JJ. S. A'., Commanding ('. S. S. Plymouth. 
Hon. Geo. M. Robeson, 

Secretary of the Navy, 

Washington, D. C. 

General Order, No. 213. 

June 27, 1876. 

At a General Court-Martial, convened at the navy yard at Norfolk, Virginia, on 
the 7th of June, 1876, was arraigned and tried James A. Bing, an Assistant Paymaster 
in the Navy, upon the charges of " conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman" 
and ''persistent and continued violation of the regulations of the Norfolk Navy 
Yard," and was found guilty of these charges, though in a less degree than charged, 
and sentenced as follows: 

" To be suspended from rank and duty for the term of six (6) months from the date 
of approval of this sentence; to be paid during that period at the rate of nine hun- 
dred dollars ($900) per annum, and to be reprimanded in General Orders by the Hon- 
orable Secretary of the Navy." 

The proceedings, finding, and sentence are approved; to take effect from the date 
of this order. 

In carrying out that part of the sentence which relates to reprimand, it is necessary 
to advert to the fact that the Secretary of the Navy is now called on for the second, 
time within a period of nine months to reprimand Assistant Paymaster James A. Bing, 
conformably to sentence of a General Court-Martial. General Order No. 195, dated 
in September last, contains the first of these reprimands. 

It is to be regretted that the sense of shame produced in the accused by that order 
has not been strong enough to prevent him from committing further offenses, and 
from thus doubly dishonoring himself and the naval service. 



150 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Every officer in the Navy should cherish a respect for authority, law, regulation, 
and gentlemanly decorum. Mr. Ring has, as this and the former conviction show, 
betrayed not only a disregard for this duty, hut a want of self-respect greatly to be 
deplored, and must now, therefore, be again published, as an offender, in every navy 
yard, naval station, and on every ship in commission. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 214. 

July 27, 1876. 
A medal of honor is hereby awarded to John Costello, ordinary seaman of the U. 
S. Steamer Hartford, for gallantry in rescuing from drowning a landsman of that 
vessel, at Philadelphia, July 16, 1876. 

Also to John Lucy, second-class boy of the U. S. Steamer Minnesota, for heroic con- 
duct on the occasion of the burning of Castle Garden at New York, July 9, 1876. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 215. 

Any ust 9, 1876. 

A medal of honor is hereby awarded to Charles Giddings, seaman, and William 
Corey, landsman, of the U. S. S. Plymouth, for heroic conduct, for their efforts in 
trying to save the life of one of the crew of that vessel, who had fallen from aloft 
overboard, at the navy yard, New York, July 26, 1876. 

Also to Thomas Kersey, seaman, of the U. S. S. Plymouth, for bravery and presence 
of mind in rescuing from drowning one of the crew of that vessel, at the navy vard, 
New York, July 26, 1876. 

Also to Boatswain's Mate Alexander Parker, of the U. S. S. Portsmouth, for gallant 
conduct in attempting to save a shipmate from drowning, at the navy yard, Mare 
Island, July 25, 1876. 

The Department notes with pleasure the promptness of Acting Boatswain John 
Brady, of the Portsmouth, in jumping overboard to assist Parker. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Seci-etary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

August 9, 1876. 
When companies of seamen and marines are united for battalion drill, or infantry 
service afloat or ashore, the marine company will take the right of the line. 

The companies of seamen shall be formed in the order of rank of the company offi- 
cers, according to the authorized tactics. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order. No. 216. 

August 12, 1876. 

The estimates made for "Pay of the Navy" for the current year were $7,600,000. 
To keep the personnel of the Navy properly employed to meet the best interests of 
the service and of the country, this amount was, in the opinion of the Department, 
actually required, as will appear from the estimates submitted, and the statements 
made up in the office of the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, where all naval accounts 
are finally settled. The representatives of the people in Congress have, however, 
determined that this sum was not necessary, upon the express grounds (see explana- 
tion of Conference Report on Naval Appropriation Bill) "that by a very rigid enforce- 
ment of a somewhat disused power on the part of the Secretary of the Navy to fur- 
lough officers, instead of having them under the heads of 'other duty' or 'waiting 
orders,' a very considerable reduction could be made," and they therefore "give the 
Secretary of the Navy the disagreeable duty of putting officers upon furlough, when 
they can be spared from the actual needs of the service, at the same time saying, that 
if it should be found by experiment that it is impossible to get through the fiscal 
year, we at another session of Congress will perhaps make it right." (Congressional 
Record, June 30, page 16.) 

In pursuance of this policy, Congress appropriated for the current year, for the 
"Pay" of the Navy to be administered upon this plan, and also reduced by cutting 
off 1,000 from its former complement of 8,500 men, the sum of $5,750,000, or nearly 
$2,000,000 less than the amount of the estimates. Under these circumstances, the 
Department, although entertaining different views, feels bound to make, in good 
faith, the effort to bring the actual expenses of this branch of the service as near as 
possible to the amount appropriated by Congress. This can only be done by reducing 
the number of officers employed to those absolutely needed to meet the daily pressing 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 151 

requirements of the service, and by putting those unemployed upon the lowest pay 
recognized by the provisions of existing laws. 

It is, indeed, a ''disagreeable duty" for the Secretary to be obliged to put so many 
well-deserving officers in a position reserved, of late years, solely for the useless and 
undeserving, and perhaps to reduce the pay of some gallant men below what is actu- 
ally necessary for the support of their families. But he has no other alternative, 
except that of refusing to carry out the expressed will of the representatives of the 
people. 

Congress will be asked, at its next session, to remedy to the deserving the evil 
which is thus done them, and, in the meantime, it will be understood that this order 
neither imputes any wrong to, nor involves the disgrace of, any such officer; but 
that it is simply an effort to meet, as near as may be, the requirements of public law, 
binding alike upon the Department and the service. 

It is therefore ordered, that — 

I. Until further orders, officers relieved from sea-going vessels, and having made a 
cruise or part of a cruise, will have as many months "leave" or "waiting orders," 
dating from the day of their detachment in any port of the United States, or if 
detached abroad, from the date of their arrival in the first port of the United States, 
as that cruise or part of a cruise has been in years, with a proportionate "leave" for 
a fraction of a year of such service. At the expiration of their " leave" or "waiting 
orders" such officers will thereafter be regarded as on "furlough," and are, by virtue 
of this order, so placed on "furlough," and will be so paid by disbursing officers 
without further instructions from the Department. 

II. Officers relieved from shore stations, harbor ships, or special duty, will have 
one month's "leave" or "waiting orders," dating from the day of their detachment, 
at the expiration of which they will be regarded as on "furlough," and are, by virtue 
of this order, so placed on "furlough," and will be so paid by disbursing officers 
without further instructions from the Department. 

III. All officers not on duty on the 1st of September next, and who are not affected 
by either of the two preceding paragraphs, will be regarded as on "furlough," and 
are, by virtue of this order, so placed on "furlough" from that date, and will there- 
after be so paid by disbursing officers without further instructions from the Depart- 
ment. 

IV. The foregoing applies only to the active list of the Navy, the pay of retired 
officers being fixed by special provision of law. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 217. 

August 12, 1876. 

Before a Naval General Court-Martial convened at the navy yard at Mare Island, 
Cal., on the 31st day of May, 1876, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, was arraigned 
and tried Bancroft Gherardi, a captain in the United States Navy, upon the charge of 
"causing punishment forbidden by law to be inflicted on persons in the Navy;" 
which charge consists of sixteen specifications, each setting forth one individual case. 

Nine of these specifications are found proven, and of the Charge the accused is 
found " Guilty." 

Sentence. 

"And the Court does therefore sentence the said Bancroft Gherardi, a captain in the 
Navy, to be suspended from duty for two years, and to be publicly reprimanded in 
general orders by the Hon. Secretary of the Navy." 

The Secretary of the Navy reluctantly approves the proceedings, finding, and sen- 
tence, because he deems the sentence inadequate to the crime proven. 

In reprimanding Captain Gherardi, the Secretary of the Navy reminds him, and the 
service at large, that no officer should abuse his lawful authority; far less should any 
officer set the example, as in this case, of a wilful and deliberate violation of law — 
of laws enacted to prevent the infliction of cruel and barbarous forms of punishment. 
No commander of a naval vessel who thus sets the example of misconduct can expect 
to secure the respect or obedience of the officers and men who are placed under his 
command,- or the confidence of the Navy Department. 

Captain Bancroft Gherardi, U. S. Navy, will, in conformity Avith his sentence, be 
suspended from duty for two years from the date of this order. 

It is further ordered that this general order be read at all navy yards, naval sta- 
tions, and on board every naval vessel in commission. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy, 

General Order, No. 218. 

August 21, 1876. 

A medal of honor is awarded to John Powers, ordinary seaman, and Michael Con- 



^52 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

nolly, ordinary seaman, of the U. S. S. Plymouth, for gallantry in rescuing a citizen 
from drowning in the harbor of Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 7, 1876. 

Also to John Osborne, seaman, of the U. S. S. Juniata, for gallant conduct in res- 
cuing from drowning an enlisted boy of that vessel, at Philadelphia, Pennsvlvania, 
August 21, 1876. 

DANIEL AMMEN, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 219. 

September 1, 1876. 
The Admiral of the Navy, on his application to the President and by his direction, 
is exempted from the provisions of General Order No. 216, operating to place other 
unemploved officers of the Navy^on "furlough." 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

September 8, 1876. 
The attention of Pay Officers of the Navy is called to the following "Circular 
Instructions relative to Public Moneys and Official Checks of United States Disburs- 
ing Officers," issued by the Treasury Department, August 24, 1876. 

J. C. HOWELL, 
Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular Instructions Belative to Public Moneys and Official Checks of United States Dis- 
bursing Officers. 
1876.— Department No. 107.— Ind. Treasury Div. No. 26. 

Treasury Department, 
Washington j D. C, August 24, 1876. 

The following sections of the Revised Statutes are published for the information 
and guidance of all concerned : 

"Section 3620. It shall be the duty of every disbursing officer having any public 
money intrusted to him for disbursement, to deposit the same with the Treasurer or 
some one of the Assistant Treasurers of the United States, and to draw for the same 
only as it may be required for payments to be made by him in pursuance of law,* and 
all transfers from the Treasurer of the United States to a disbursing officer shall be 
by draft or warrant on the Treasury or an Assistant Treasurer of the United States. 
In places, however, where there is no Treasurer or Assistant Treasurer, the Secretary 
of the Treasury may, when he deems it essential to the public interest, specially 
authorize in writing the deposit of such public money in any other public depository, 
or, in writing, authorize the same to be kept in any other manner, and under such 
rules and regulations as he may deem most safe and effectual to facilitate the pay- 
ments to public creditors." 

"Section 5488. Every disbursing officer of the United States who deposits any pub- 
lic money intrusted to him in any place or in any manner, except as authorized by 
law, or converts to his own use in any way whatever, or loans with or without inter- 
est, or for any purpose not described by law withdraws from the Treasurer or any 
Assistant Treasurer, or any authorized depository, or for any purpose not prescribed 
by law transfers or applies any portion of the public money intrusted to him, is, in 
every such act, deemed guilty of an embezzlement of the money so deposited, con- 
verted, loaned, withdrawn, transferred, or applied ; and shall be punished by impris- 
onment with hard labor for a term not less than one year nor more than ten years, or 
by a fine of not more than the amount embezzled or less than one thousand dollars, 
or by both such fine and imprisonment." 

In accordance with the provisions of the above sections, any public money ad- 
vanced to disbursing officers of the United States must be deposited immediately to 
their respective credits, with either the United States Treasurer, some Assistant 
Treasurer, or designated depository, other than a national bank depository, nearest 
or most convenient, or, by special direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, with a 
national bank depositary, except — 

(1.) Any disbursing officer of the War Department, specially authorized by the 
Secretary of War, when stationed on the extreme frontier or at places far remote from 
such depositaries, may keep, at his own risk, such moneys as may be intrusted to him 
for disbursement. 

(2.) Any officer receiving money remitted to him upon specific estimates, may dis- 
burse it accordingly, without waiting to place it in a depository, provided the pay- 
ments are due, and he prefers this method to that of drawing checks. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 153 

Any check drawn by a disbursing officer upon moneys thus deposited must be in 
favor of the party, by name, to whom the payment is to be made, and payable to 
''order'' or "bearer," with these exceptions: 

(1.) To make payments of individual pensions, checks for which must be made pay- 
able to "order," (2) to make payments of amounts not exceeding twenty dollars, (3) 
to make payments at a distance from a depository, and (4) to make payments of fixed 
salaries, due at a certain period ; in either of which cases, except the first, any disbursing 
officer may draw his check in favor of himself or bearer for such amount as may be 
necessary for such payment, but in the last-named case the check must be drawn not 
more than two days before the salaries become due. 

Any disbursing officer or agent drawing checks on money deposited to his official 
credit must state on the face or back of each check the object or purpose to which 
the avails are to be applied, except upon checks issued in payment of individual pen- 
sions, the special form of such checks indicating sufficiently the character of the dis- 
bursement. 

Such statement may be made in brief form, but must clearly indicate the object of the 
expenditure, as, for instance, "pay," "pay-roll," or "payment of troops," adding 
the fort or station; "purchase of subsistence" or other supplies; "on contract for 
construction," mentioning the fortification or other public work for which the pay- 
ment is made; "payments under $20 ; " " to pay foreign pensions," &c. 

Checks will not be returned to the drawer after their payment, but the depositary 
with whom the account is kept shall furnish the officer with a monthly statement of 
his deposit account. 

No allowance will be made to any disbursing officer for expenses charged for col- 
lecting money on checks. 

In case of the death, resignation, or removal of any disbursing officer, checks prev- 
iously drawn by him will be paid from the funds to his credit, unless such checks have 
been drawn more than four months before their presentation, or reason exists for sus- 
pecting fraud. 

Every disbursing officer when opening his first account, before issuing any checks, 
will furnish the depositary on whom the checks are drawn with his official signature 
duly verified by some officer whose signature is known to the depositary. 

For every deposit made by a disbursing officer to his official credit a receipt in 
form as below shall be given, setting forth, besides its serial number and the place 
and date of issue, the character of the funds, i. e., whether coin or currency; and if 
the credit is made by a disbursing officer's check transferring funds to another dis- 
bursing officer, the essential items of the check shall be enumerated; if by a Treasury 
draft, like items shall be given, including the warrant number; the title of each offi- 
cer shall be expressed, and the title of the disbursing account shall also show for 
what branch of the public service the account is kept, as it is essential for the proper 
transaction of departmental business that accounts of.moneys advanced from differ- 
ent bureaus to a disbursing officer serving in two or more distinct capacities be kept 
separate and distinct from each other, and. be so reported to the Department both by 
the officer and the depositary — the receipt to be retained by the officer in whose favor 
it is issued : 

No. . Office of the U. S. (Assistant Treasurer or Depositary,) 

, , 18 . 

Received of , rB5 - Dollars, consisting of , to be placed to his credit as , 

and subject only to his check in that official capacity. 

$ . " • 1— , 



['. S. (Assistant Treasurer or Depositary.) 

These regulations are intended to supersede those of January 2, 1872. 

Chas. F. Conant, 

Acting Secretary. 



Circular. 

September 28, 1876. 

The armorer of a vessel of war, as his title signifies, is a person appointed to keep 
the ship's arms in a condition for service. 

These duties have fallen into disuse, and he has become the ship's blacksmith. 

Hereafter, on board steam-vessels, all blacksmith's work shall be done by the en- 
gineer department. 

The armorer and his mates shall, under the supervision of the gunner, have charge 
of the armory, and shall keep the small arms and machine guns in order. 

No person shall be rated armorer or armorer's mate unless he shall pass a satisfac- 
tory examination as to his knowledge of the construction and care of the small arms 
and machine guns used in the naval service, and is capable of shifting and replacing 
spare parts. 

GEO. M. RORESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



154 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 19. 

October, 17, 1876. 

The provisions of paragraph 805 of the Navy Regulations, restricting the right of 
naval officers on furlough " to leave the State or Territory of which they are residents, 
or to visit the Navy Department " without permission, and the provisions of para- 
graph 1432, forbidding them "to wear their uniforms, except on occasions of special 
ceremonies," are not to apply to the officers placed upon furlough under the opera- 
tions of General Order No. 216, and all officers so placed upon furlough by the opera- 
tion of said General Order are hereby exempted from the operations and effect of 
the provisions of the said paragraphs 805 and 1432. 

GEO. M. RORESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 220. 

December 25, 1876. 

The Commandants of naval stations and Commanding Officers of vessels-of-war 
will direct observations to be taken, recorded, and forwarded to the Bureau of Navi- 
gation, in accordance with the accompanying instructions, designating a particular 
officer to be responsible for the duty. 

One meteorological observation, suitable for the preparation of synoptic charts, 
and to embrace, when practicable, at least atmospheric pressure, temperature, wind, 
rain, reading of wet-bulb thermometer, sea-swell, and weather, will be taken and 
recorded daily, commencing the day following the receipt of this order, with the 
accompanying forms, on every vessel in commission and at every naval station of the 
United States, at 7.35 a. m., Washington mean time. 

The record of these observations will form part of the record of the System of In- 
ternational Meteorological Observations, taken simultaneously, upon which the 
United States have entered. 

The Secretary of the Navy enjoins the greatest care and promptitude in the prep- 
aration of it. GEO. M. RORESON, 

— Secretary of the Navy. 

INSTRUCTIONS. 

The blanks prepared and issued for these Simultaneous International Meteorologi- 
cal Observations exhibit the character of the particular readings required. Any 
necessary additional instruments will be furnished by the Department with as little 
delay as practicable, and will be employed as soon as received, to render the obser- 
vations more complete. Applications jtherefor, or correspondence upon the subjects 
of this order, wil" " 



General Order. No. 221. 

January 9, 1877. 
At a Naval General Court-Martial, convened at the New York navy yard, October 
31, 1876, the following officers were tried on the charges and specifications herein set 
forth, and were convicted and sentenced as is herein declared, viz: 

I. Alexander A. Semnies, a captain in the Navy of the United States. 

Charge. — "Violation of article twenty-fourth of the Articles for the Government of 

the Navy." 
Specification. — "Compelling seamen in double irons to stand up all day, till 10 o'clock 
in the evening, except at meals, and to have no blankets or hammocks at night." 

Finding. 
"Guilty," except as to dermvation of hammocks and blankets, and "until 10 
o'clock in." 

Sentence. 
"To be suspended from duty six months, and reprimanded in general orders by 
the Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

II. Felix McCurley, a lieutenant commander in the Navy of the United States. 

Charges. 

1. "Using disrespectful language concerning his superior and late commanding officer 

in an official communication to the Secretary of the Navy." 

2. "Employing an enlisted man to act as his scribe in writing a letter to the Secre- 

tary of the Navy, charging his superior officer with making a false official 
report in regard to said Lieutenant Commander McCurley. 11 

3. "Conduct subversive of discipline." 

4. "Official neglect of duty and inefficiency in performing his official duties." 
Specifications embrace, besides the facts stated in first and second charges, utter- 

ng similar complaints and using language of censure on his commander in ward- 
room conversations : various negligences as executive officer." 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 155 

Finding! 
"Guilty " of charges 1 and 2; not guilty of charges 3 and 4. 

Sentence. 
"Six months' suspension from duty, and reprimand in general orders by the Hon- 
orable Secretary of the Navy.*' 

III. William /.'. IlroivH, a captain in the United States Marine Corps. 

Charges. 

1. "Disrespectful treatment of his commanding officer." 

2. "Conduct subversive of naval discipline." 

Specifications. — "Seeking interview with Captain Semines in order to make an official 
communication, and then refusing to make it unless Paymaster Lisle were 
present as witness ; promising and then failing to make the communication in 
writing; twice employing enlisted men to write letters for him to the Depart- 
ment, containing complaints and accusations against their commanding officer.'-* 
Finding.— "Guilty." 
Sentence. 
"To be suspended from duty one year, and be reprimanded in general orders by 
the Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

IV. Michael Bradley, a surgeon in the United States Navy. 
Charge. — " Drunkenness." 

Specifications. — "On several successive days: July 13 and September 27, 1876." 
Finding. — "Guilty by plea." 
Sentence. 
"Three years' suspension from rank and duty, on furlough pay, and reprimanded 
in general orders by the Honorable Secretary of the Navy." 

V. The reprimand of Lieut. Commander Felix McCurley is remitted. With this 
exception, the Department approves the proceedings, findings, and sentences in each 
and all of said cases ; and this order will be read on board every U. S. vessel in com- 
mission, at each naval station, and at the several Marine barracks, as an order of 
reprimand to Captain Alexander A. Semmes, U. S. N., to Captain William B. Brown, V. 
S. Marine Corps, and to Surgeon Michael Bradley, U. S. N. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 222. 

March 5, 1877. 

All officers furloughed under the operation of General Order No. 216, dated August 
12, 1876, will hereafter be paid as on "waiting orders," under the provisions of the 
act of March 3, 1877, "making appropriations to supply deficiencies in the appropria- 
tions for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-seven, 
and prior years, and for other purposes." 

Under the special wording of said act, it seems necessary that the general order 
should remain in force until the expiration of the fiscal year, in order to secure to 
the service the full benefits of said provisions, but the same is hereby absolutely 
revoked, to take effect from the first of July, 1877. 

The following instructions, as to the mode of payment, are hereto appended, at the 
request of the accounting officers of the Treasury : 

1st. Officers affected by said General Order No. 216 will make application to the 
Fourth Auditor of the Treasury for amount due for difference between "furlough" 
and "waiting orders'" pay from the date they were placed on furlough until the first 
of March, 1877. 

2d. After March first officers on furlough under said order will be paid by disburs- 
ing officers. 

3d. Paymasters, upon whose books such officers on furlough are borne, will make 
up the amount of furlough pay separate, and in the line immediately below the 
amount of the difference between furlough and waiting orders' pay, showing on their 
pay-rolls the amount paid out under each head; and the accounting officers will 
adjust the accounts upon settlement. 

4th. Requisitions will be made on "Pay of the Navy," as heretofore, for the fur- 
lough, pay, and on the indefinite appropriation for the difference; and each disburs- 
ing officer is directed to report to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, each month, 
upon the summary statement the amount so credited, as difference of pay. 

GEO. M. ROBESON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



156 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

CIRCULAR. 

March 14, 1877. 
All cases involving questions of law and regulations shall be immediately referred 
to the Naval Solicitor and Judge Advocate of the Department, who will promptly 
consider them and render his opinion as early as possible, together with a brief of 
same, to the Secretary. 

Respectfully, R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

March 15, 1877. 
Commandants of navy yards and stations will report to the Secretary of the Navy, 
without delay, the names of any clerks, writers, or employes whose services can be 
dispensed with without detriment to the naval service. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

March 15, 1877. 

The Chiefs of Bureaus of the Navy Department will meet twice each week at the 
hour named by the Secretary of the Navy, who will preside over them as a Board. 
In his absence, the senior in rank will do so. 

Each Chief of Bureau, as directed by the Secretary, will lay before him the actual 
condition of the affairs of the Bureau ; the exact condition of its funds ; the supplies 
on hand; all supplies supposed to be required for its efficiency, and to what extent 
and in what manner he proposes to supply them; and any supposed obligation or 
indebtedness entered into and existing. 

The obtainment of supplies for each Bureau; the opening and discussion of bids; 
the assignment of contracts proposed; the failure of contractors to properly fulfill 
their contracts; the proposed expenditures of all moneys, on estimates, stating their 
purposes, will be laid before the Secretary by the Chief of Bureau having cognizance 
of that branch of the Department, and will be passed upon by him, with the assent of 
the Secretary. If any other Chief of Bureau should regard the subject discussed 
adversely, he will state briefly the ground of his dissent, which will be entered upon 
the record, but will not control in any manner the proposed expenditure appropri- 
ated for the Bureau concerned. 

Any proposed increase or decrease of the working force at the several navy yards, 
of an extensive character, will be discussed, and the reasons given therefor, and 
passed upon in like manner as above; and instructions will be issued to the com- 
mandants of the said navy yards, when discharges are to be made, to select for dis- 
charge those least efficient, and to retain no employes that are not necessary, useful, 
and effective in their vocation, whether found to be employed by the recommenda- 
tion of the Department or otherwise. 

A record shall be kept of the proceedings, which will be read and approved by the 
Board at the next meeting. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

March 16, 1877. 
The following circular from the Treasury Department, containing instructions 
concerning the payment of Treasury drafts and official checks of public disbursing 
officers, is published for the information of the pay officers of the United States Navy. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular Instructions Concerning the Payment of Treasury Drafts and Official Checks of 

Public Disbursing Officers. 

1877.— Department No. 27.— Ind. Treasury Div. No. 28. 

Treasury Department, 
Washington, D. C, February 13, 1877. 
The following sections of the Revised Statutes of the United States and the sub- 
sequent regulations are published for the information and guidance of all concerned: 
" Section 306. At the termination of each fiscal year all amounts of moneys that 
are represented by certificates, drafts, or checks, issued by the Treasurer, or by any 
disbursing officer of any Department of the Government, upon the Treasurer or any 
assistant treasurer, or designated depositary of the United States, or upon any national 
bank designated as a depositary of the United States, and which shall be represented 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 157 

on the books of either of such offices as standing to the credit of any disbursing officer, 
and which were issued to facilitate the payment of warrants, or for any other pur- 
pose in liquidation of a debt due from the United States, and Avhich have for three 
years or more remained outstanding, unsatisfied and unpaid, shall be deposited by 
the Treasurer, to be covered into the Treasury by warrant, and to be carried to the 
credit of the parties in whose favor such certificates, drafts, or checks were respect- 
ively issued, or to the persons who are entitled to receive pay therefor, and iuto an 
appropriation account to be denominated ' outstanding liabilities. 4 ' " 

" Section 308. The payee or the bona fide holder of any draft or check, the amount 
of which has been deposited and covered into the Treasury pursuant to the preced- 
ing sections, shall, on presenting the same to the proper officer of the Treasury, be 
entitled to have it paid by the settlement of an account and the issuing of a warrant 
in his favor, according to the practice in other cases of authorized and liquidated 
claims against the United States. 

"Section 309. The amounts, except such as are provided for in section three hun- 
dred and six, of the accounts of every kind of disbursing officer, which shall have 
remained unchanged, or which shall not have been increased by any new deposit 
thereto, nor decreased by drafts drawn thereon, for the space of three years, shall in 
like manner be covered into the Treasury, to the proper appropriation to which they 
belong; and the amounts thereof shall, on the certificate of the^Treasurer that such 
amount has been deposited in the Treasury, be credited by the proper accounting 
officer of the Department of the Treasury on the books of the Department, to the 
officer in whose name it had stood on the books of any agency of the Treasury, if it 
appears that he is entitled to such credit. 

" Section 310. The Treasurer, each assistant treasurer, and each designated deposi 
tary of the United States, and the cashier of each of the national banks designated 
as such depositaries, shall, at the close of business on every thirtieth day of June, 
report to the Secretary of the Treasury the condition of every account standing, as 
in the preceding section specified, on the books of their respective offices, stating the 
name of each depositor, with his official designation, the total amount remaining on 
deposit to his credit, and the dates, respectively, of the last credit and the last debit 
made to each account. And each disbursing officer shall make a like return of all 
checks issued by him, and which may then have been outstanding and unpaid for 
three years or more, stating fully in such report the name of the payee, for what pur- 
pose each check was given, the office on which drawn, the number of the voucher 
received therefor, the date, number, and amount for which it was drawn, and, when 
known, the residence of the payee." 

KEGULATIONS. 

(1.) Hereafter any Treasury draft or any check drawn by a public disbursing officer 
still in service, which shall be presented for payment before it shall have been issued 
three full fiscal years, will be paid in the usual manner by the office or bank on which 
it is drawn, and from funds to the credit of the drawer. Thus, any such draft or 
check issued on or after July 1, 1873, will be paid as above stated until June 30, 1877, 
and the same rule will apply for subsequent years. 

Any such draft or check which has been issued for a longer period than three full 
fiscal years will be paid only by the settlement of an account in this Department, as 
provided in Section 308 above published ; and for this purpose the draft or check 
will be transmitted to the Secretary of the Treasury for the necessary action. 

(2.) The reports of independent Treasury officers, national bank depositaries, and 
public disbursing officers, required by Section 310 above published, will be rendered 
promptly to the Secretary of the Treasury at the close of each fiscal year. 

(3.) Whenever any disbursing officer of the United States shall cease to act in that 
capacity, he will at once inform the Secretary of the Treasury whether he has any 
public funds to his credit in any office or bank, and, if so, what checks, if any, he 
has drawn against the same which are still outstanding and. unpaid. Until satisfac- 
tory information of this character shall have been furnished, the whole amount of 
such moneys will be held to meet the payment of his checks properly payable there- 
from. 

(4.) Hereafter, at the close of each fiscal year, the Treasurer, the several assistant 
treasurers and designated national bank depositaries, will also render to the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury a list of all disbursing officers' accounts still unclosed which 
have been opened on the books of their respective offices or banks more than three 
fiscal years, giving in each case the name and official designation of the officer, the 
date when the account with him was opened, and the balance remaining to his credit. 

(5.) In case of the death, resignation, or removal of a public disbursing officer, any 
check previously drawn by him and not presented for payment within four months 
of its date will not be paid until its correctness shall have been attested by the Sec- 
retary or Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. 



158 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

(6.) If the object or purpose for which any check of a public disbursing officer is 
drawn is not stated thereon, as required by Departmental regulations, or if any 
reason exists for suspecting fraud, the office or bank on which such check is drawn 
will refuse its payment. 

Chas. F. Conant, 

Acting Secretary. 

General Order, No. 223. 

March 16, 1877. 
As the Department is frequently receiving records of proceedings of naval courts 
and boards purporting to be convened, or organized and conducted, under acts of 
Congress prior in date to the Eevised Statutes of the United States, all officers in the 
service and all persons acting as recorders, or judge advocates, of boards or courts, 
are reminded that the Revised Statutes and the acts of Congress passed subsequent 
to December 1, 1873, are the only laws which define the powers and duties and regu- 
late the organization and mode of procedure of courts-martial (general or summary), 
of courts of inquiry, and of naval boards. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No* 224. 

March 23, 1877. 

Application for orders, or revocation of them, shall be made by the officer himself, 
in an official form, stating the precise ground upon which he bases his claim for a 
change. 

All applications for this purpose made by other than the officer himself will be 
regarded as exceptional, and will be considered only when the circumstances are 
extraordinary, and the officer so distant as not to be able to make an official appli- 
cation within a reasonable time, and where the public interests will not suffer by the 
change. 

The applications will be placed on file and regarded as official. 

R: W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 2. 

March 23, 1877. 
Paragraph 18, page 37, of the Regulations of 1876, for the government of the Navy, 
is modified as follows : 

When an officer in charge of a division is senior in rank to the "aid or executive," 
as a senior cannot be required to report to a junior, unless that junior be in actual 
command of the vessel or station at the time, the commanding officer will direct 
either that a junior officer of the division shall make the customary reports to the 
"aid or executive," or that the officer of division senior to the "aid or executive" 
shall make such reports directly to himself. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

April 3, 1877. 

The Secretary of the Navy regrets that it has become his duty to announce to the 
officers of the naval service that the amount of money found by him in the Treasury 
of the United States, to the credit of the appropriation "Pay of the Navy," is insuffi- 
cient to pay the officers for the months of April, May, and June. 

The Secretary proposes to retain as much as may be found necessary of what there 
is in the Treasury, under "Pay of the Navy," for the purpose of paying allotments 
to the Avives of officers and sailors whose husbands are abroad in the service of their 
country, and unable to otherwise provide for them; and in this purpose the Secre- 
tary feels that he will be sustained by every high-minded, honorable officer in the 
Navv of the United States. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

April 14, 1877. 
The Department's circular of April 3, 1877, does not apply to officers on furlough, 
who are allowed the difference between furlough and waiting orders' pay, under the 
provisions of the act of March 3, 1877. 

They will continue to be paid the difference of pay for the present quarter, as indi- 
cated in General Order No. 222. 

J. C. HOWELL, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 159 

Circular. 

April 20, 1877. 
Pay officers of the Navy, having been detached from duty involving monetary and 
property responsibilities, will forward to this Department, before proceeding to enter 
upon other like trusts and duties, a certificate from the accounting officers of the 
Treasury testifying that their accounts have been examined, and that there are no 
cheokages on account of past duty, nor any apparent present indebtedness, existing 
against them. 

They will in no such case be permitted to enter upon the new sphere of duty, in 
the absence of such certificate, without satisfactory explanation and special permis- 
sion of the Department. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular Letter of Instructions. 

April 25, 1877. 

Sir: Your attention is called to the Revised Statutes, Title 43, which relates to 
public contracts, and especially to Sections 3743 to 3747, inclusive, which are as fol- 
lows, viz : 

Sec. 3743. ******** 

Sec. 3744. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of War, of the Secretary of the 
Navy, and of the Secretary of the Interior, to cause and require every contract 
made by them severally on behalf of the Government, or by their officers under them 
appointed to make such contracts, to be reduced to writing, and signed by the con- 
tracting parties with their names at the end thereof: a copy of which shall be filed 
by the officer making and signing the contract in the Returns Office of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior, as soon after the contract is made as possible, and within thirty 
days, together with all bids, offers, and proposals to him made by persons to obtain 
the same, and with a copy of any advertisement he may have published inviting 
bids, offers, or proposals for the same. All the copies and papers in relation to each 
contract shall be attached together by a ribbon and seal, and marked by numbers in 
regular order, according to the number of papers composing the whole return. 

Sec. 3745. It shall be the further duty of the officer, before making his return, 
according to the preceding section, to affix to the same his affidavit in the following 
form, sworn to before some magistrate having authority to administer oaths: "I do 
solemnly swear (or affirm) that the copy of contract hereto annexed is an exact copy 

of a contract made by me personally with ■; that I made the same fairly 

without any benefit or advantage to myself, or allowing any such benefit or advant- 
age corruptly to the said , or any other person; and that the papers 

accompanying include all those relating to the said contract, as required by the stat- 
ute in such case made and provided." 

Sec. 3746. Every officer who makes any contract, and fails or neglects to make 
return of the same, according to the provisions of the two preceding sections, unless 
from unavoidable accident or causes not within his control, shall be deemed guilty 
of a misdemeanor, and shall be fined not less than one hundred dollars nor more than 
five hundred, and imprisoned not more than six months. 

Sec. 3747. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of War, of the Secretary of the 
Navy, and of the Secretary of the Interior to furnish every officer appointed by them 
with authority to make contracts on behalf of the Government with a printed letter 
of instructions, setting forth the duties of such officer, under the two preceding sec- 
tions, and also to furnish therewith forms, printed in blank, of contracts to be made, 
and the affidavit of returns required to be affixed thereto, so that all the instruments 
may be as nearly uniform as possible. 

With this "Letter of Instructions" I forward to you two sets of blank forms of 
contracts, and a copy of the affidavit required of you by said Section 3745. 

It is desired that all contracts should be uniform in the size and style of paper on 
which they are engrossed, and also that this Department be informed of your com- 
pliance with these instructions. 

Whenever you transmit to the Returns Office the copies, papers, and affidavit in- 
quired bylaw, you will, at the same time,, transmit the original contract to the 
Secretary of the Navy, with a letter informing him of the fact that the copies, re- 
quired by Section 3744 to be filed in the Returns Office, were sent to the Secretary of 
the Interior. 

Please acknowledge the receipt of this letter and of the accompanying forms. 
Respectfully vours, 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To the Bureaus and Others. 



160 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular No. 3. 

April 28, 1877. 
The following regulations in regard to the interchange of visits between officers 
of U. S. ships-of-war and those of foreign men-of-war shall, in future, be observed 
in all ports, whether home or foreign, by the commanding officers of U. S. ships. 

PRELIMINARY VISITS. 

The senior officer in port will — whatever may be his rank— send an officer with 
the offer of the customary courtesies to the senior officer of any arriving vessel or 
vessels of war. 

It is expected that such visits of courtesy will be returned. 

OFFICIAL VISITS. 

Within twenty-four (24) hours of arrival, weather permitting, the officer in chief 
command of the arriving ship or ships will visit the officer in chief command of the 
ship or ships in port, if he be his equal in grade ; and the visit will be returned 
within twenty-four (24) hours afterwards. Should the arriving commanding officer 
be superior in grade to the officer commanding in port, the first visit will be paid by 
the latter officer, as the inferior in grade. 

Flag officers will return the visits of captains and those of higher rank. 

Captains, and commanding officers of a lower grade, will return the visits of com- 
manders and officers of inferior rank in command. 

Captains and other officers in command of arriving ships will — after visits have 
been exchanged by their superiors — call upon captains and other officers in com- 
mand of ships first in port, who will return the visits. 

Anything in the Naval Regulations conflicting with these instructions, is hereby 
annulled. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
Secretary of the Xavy. 

Order. May 3, 1877. 

All questions, hereafter, in reference to the movements of ships will be considered 
confidential. Such orders as the Secretary of the Navy may give on this subject 
will be communicated by him to the Bureau of Navigation, by which a record thereof 
shall be kept for the information of the Chiefs of Bureaus. 

The same rule will be observed in regard to reports received respecting the move- 
ments and operations of vessels in commission for service. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
— — Secretary of the Xavy. 

Circular to Pay Officers. 

May 9, 1877. 

Sir : I have carefully considered the probable embarrassment to which the officers 
and men of the Navy will be subjected because of the deficiency under appropria- 
tion " Pay of the Navy," and consequent inability to make the current payments for 
the months of April, May, and June. But I find, myself unable, without violating 
express provisions of law, to afford them any relief in an official form. If I pos- 
sessed the power it would gratify me to exercise it for their protection. 

The law prohibits all the Departments of Government from expending, in any fis- 
cal year, any sum in excess of appropriations for that year, or from involving the 
Government in any contract for the future payment of money in excess of such ap- 
propriations. It, moreover, subjects any officer who shall violate it to indictment 
and punishment. These provisions are imperative, and leave me without any offi- 
cial discretion whatever. 

At the expiration of each month any officer on your rolls who may desire it may be 
furnished by you with a certificate of the accompanying form, showing the amount 
due him by the Government. If the law permitted to be attached to this a promise 
by the Secretary of the Navy that the money would be paid out of any future appro- 
priation, it is believed there would be no difficulty in procuring money upon it. But 
as this is impossible under the law, all further transactions must be conducted solely 
between the officer holding the certificate and the person advancing the pay. 

Respectfully, &c, , 

To . — Secretary of the Xavy. 

FORM OF CERTIFICATE. 

u. s. , 

To . , 1877. 

I certify that there is due you on the books of this , under appropria- 
tion of " Pay of the Navy," the sum of dollars and cents, 

for the month of , 1877. , 

Pay , U. S. N. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 161 

Circular. 

May 9, 1877. 

The Department having decided that it will not be proper to pay the balances re- 
maining due to officers and men, under " Pay of the Navy," at the close of the pres- 
ent fiscal year, from the appropriation made for the fiscal year, the pay officers of all 
stations and vessels are hereby directed not to carry their balances forward to their 
pay-rolls for the third quarter of 1877, but to leave them as "remaining due and un- 
paid," on their rolls ending June 30, 1877, and they will be considered as turned into 
the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, for final adjustment and settlement when an ap- 
propriation shall be made therefor by Congress. In opening their pay-rolls for the 
third quarter of 1877, pay officers will transfer the accounts of all the persons on 
their books, as usual only omitting the balances " remaining due and unpaid;" but 
where officers or men are indebted to the Government, the balances overpaid shall 
be transferred and taken up on the new accounts. 

In order to enable the Department to ascertain the exact total deficiency at the 
earliest practicable moment, pay officers will make up and forward their accounts 
ending June 30, 1877, as soon as they possibly can after the close of the quarter. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 4. 

May 10, 1877. 
The Regulations (of 1876) for the Government of the Navy are hereby amended as 
follows : 

Paragraph 13, page 93, by inserting the word/ve after the word " thirty," so as to 
read thirty-five years. 

Paragraph 3, page 155, by substituting the word his for the word " their," and the 
word account for the word "pay" in the third line, so as to read deducted from his 
account. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 225, 

May 14, 1877. 
It is hereby ordered that, in the event of an enlisted man of the Navy being sen- 
tenced by court-martial to loss of pay, such sentence shall not deprive "him of such 
articles of clothing and small stores as may be deemed necessary for his health and 
comfort by the commanding officer of the ship or barrack where he may be confined. 
The pay officer issuing the stores will make a return of the same to the Bureau of 
Provisions and Clothing, in order that a transfer of the cost of the clothing may be 
made from the appropriation " Pay of the Navy" to the "Clothing Fund for the 
Navy." 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 226. 

May 15, 1877. 
Many steam-logs, quarterly reports, synopses, and indicator diagrams are for- 
warded to the Department with important data omitted, without which they are 
almost useless. The attention of engineer officers in charge is called to the explana- 
tions and directions contained in the steam-log books, and to the regulations gov- 
erning logs and reports. All the blanks in the printed forms must be filled up, and 
the reports must be made out so as to comply literally with the regulations. This 
is important, as the Department depends chiefly on these logs and reports for its 
knowledge of the performance and efficiency of the machinery of our ships. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

May 21, 1877. 
For the purpose of ascertaining the relation between the diseases incident to life on 
board ship and the condition of the air between decks, medical officers of the Navy 
are required to make careful hygrometric, and, when possible, accurate eudiometric 
observations on board all ships in commission. 

They will make quarterly tabulated returns of these observations to the Bureau 
of Medicine and Surgery. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
11 Secretary of the Navy. 



162 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 5. 

June 1, 1877. 
The "jack-of-the-dust" and baymen are to be enlisted for general service, sub- 
ject to selection by the paymaster and senior surgeon, and the approval of the com- 
manding officer. 

Paragraphs 11 and 12, pages 95 and 96, Navy Regulations, are hereby, amended in 
conformity with this order. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

June 4, 1877. 

Attention is called to the following sections of the Revised Statutes, the opinion 
of the Attorney General relating to advertisements, and the requirements of the 
Second Comptroller in regard to accounts for advertising: 

Sec. 853. For publishing any notice or order required by law, or the lawful order 
of any court, Department, Bureau, or other person, in any newspaper, except as 
mentioned in sections thirty -eight hundred and twenty-three, thirty-eight hundred 
and twenty-four, and thirty-eight hundred and twenty-five, title "Public Printing, 
Advertisements, aDd Public Documents," forty cents per folio for the first insertion, 
and twenty cents per folio for each subsequent insertion. The compensation herein 
provided shall include the furnishing of lawful evidence, under oath, of publication, 
to be made and furnished by the printer or publisher making such publication. 

Sec. 854. The term folio, in this chapter, shall mean one hundred words, counting 
each figure as a word. When there are over fifty and under one hundred words 
they shall be counted as one folio, but a less number than fifty words shall not be 
counted, except when the whole statute, notice, or order contains less than fifty 
words. 

Department of Justice, 
The Secretary of the Interior. Washington, D. C, August 14, 1876. 

Sir : Yours of the seventh instant, addressed to the Attorney General, calls his 
attention to the discrepancy between the rates payable for advertisements on behalf 
of the Government, between sections 853 and 3826, and also to the repealing language 
used in the act of 1875, ch. 128, s. 1 (18 Stats., 342), in reference to section 3826, and 
asks what is the united effect of such sections upon a claim presented by " The 
Republican," a newspaper of this city, for publishing by due order an advertisement 
for stationery for your Department. 

Section 853 treats of publications on behalf of the Government of notices in general^ 
and prescribes a certain compensation therefor, viz : forty cents by the folio, &c. 
Section 3826 treats of such notices as are required to be published in the District of Co- 
lumbia, fyc, and prescribes therefor a compensation not higher than is paid by individuals 
for advertising in said paper. 

I understand the joint effect of these two sections to be that papers in the District 
of Columbia shall have the compensation fixed by section 853, unless (under section 
3826) that be more than is paid by private individuals for like services. This construction 
reconciles the apparent conflict, and shows why section 3826 is not named with the 
other sections expressly excepted in section 853. This rule, I believe, has been often 
applied by courts in like cases, and in the instance before me gives due effect to both 
sections. 

However, I regard the effect of section 3826 upon section 853 as entirely specula- 
tive for all publications of advertisements in newspapers since the act of March 3,, 
1875, above referred to. A provision for repeal as sweeping as that therein contained 
"has an effect (in appropriation acts) wholly regardless of the place or the general 
nature of the act in which it is found." 7 Opinions, &c, 303; 14 tfo.,681. In my 
opinion it repeals section 3826 for every purpose connected with the claim before you. 
Yours, with great respect, 

S. F. Phillips, 

Approved: Solicitor General. 

Alphonso Taft, 

Attorney General. 

Extract from letter of Second Comptroller. 

Treasury Department, 

Second Comptroller's Office, 

Washington, May ;14, 1877. 
Sir: * * * * " Heretofore the payment to newspapers for publishing notices 
authorized by 'the Department, Bureau, or other person/ has been made by the pay 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 163 

officers at the usual rates for advertising charged by the respective newspapers, on 
general hills approved by the Department." 

In the adjustment of the accounts of disbursing officers of the Navy this office will 
hereafter require that all payments for newspaper advertisements must be in con- 
formity with the inclosed opinion, and that a certified copy of the advertisement 
accompany the voucher on which payment is made as well as a copy of the written 
authority of the Department for such advertisement, as required by section 3828 of 
the Revised Statutes. 

Very respectfully, 

C. C. Carpenter, 

Second Comptroller. 
Hon. R. W. Thompson, 

' Secretary of the Navy. — 

Attention is also called to the following provision of law : 

Act of July 31, 1876. * * * "And in no case of advertisements for 
contracts for the public service shall the same be published in any newspaper pub- 
lished and printed in the District of Columbia unless the supplies or labor covered 
by such advertisements are to be furnished or performed in said District of 
Columbia." 

Pay officers or others, who, in carrying out orders from the Department or any 
Bureau thereof, are under the necessity of advertising, will forward to the Depart- 
ment a copy of the proposed advertisement, and the Department will take such 
further steps as may be required for the publication of the same. 

R. W. THOMPSON. 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 1. 

Instructions to Commandants of Navy Yards. 

June 22, 1877. 

1. Commandants of navy yards and stations will conform strictly to the require- 
ments of the Navy Regulations of 1876, and will hold all under their command to a 
strict accountability under these regulations. 

2. Laborers shall be employed in the several navy yards by the proper officers in 
charge with reference to skill and efficiency, and without regard to political or other 
considerations. No officer or employe in any of the navy yards shall require or 
request any workingman to contribute or to pay any money for political purposes, nor 
shall any workingman be discharged for political opinions. [See Revised Statutes, 
Sections 1544 and 1546.] 

3. So soon as the quarters now occupied at a navy yard or station shall become 
vacant, the Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, subject to the approval of the 
Secretary of the Navy, shall assign the same to such officer as, in his opinion, may 
be entitled to them In this assignment of quarters the necessity of the continual 
presence of a surgeon shall be recognized. 

4. The commandants of navy yards and stations shall assemble the heads of 
departments under their command, at the commandant's office, at 10 a. m. of each 
working day, in order that the letters from the Navy Department referring to the 
business of the navy yard or station may be read to them collectively. Each head 
of department will then be handed the letters relating to his especial duties — with 
directions to have them copied — marked " copied" over his signature, and returned 
to the commandant's office within twenty-four hours. 

5. A board of inspection, consisting of a line officer and a paymaster in the Navy, 
shall be appointed by the commandant of each navy yard, from the officers of the 
yard, to serve three months, unless otherwise ordered. 

To this board the commandant shall, when necessary, appoint a third officer, to 
be taken from the department whose material is to be inspected; and these three 
officers will carefully inspect such articles as may be submitted to them, and shall, 
report to the commandant in writing, whether, in their judgments, the material 
inspected is of good quality, of fair market price, or according to contract if furnished 
by contract. 

Should any member of the board make objection to any of the articles inspected, 
he shall, upon the face of the report of inspection, state his objections in writing, 
over his signature; and in case of difference of opinion between said board of 
inspection and any paymaster engaged in making purchases, the same shall be 
reported by the commandant to the proper Bureau for decision. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



164 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 227. 

June 30, 1877. 
The following decision of the Supreme Court of the United States is published for 
the information of the Navy. 

Under this construction of the law, regulating public labor, given by the Supreme 
Court of the United States, the Department has fixed the rate of labor for mechanics, 
foremen, leading-men, and laborers on the basis of ten hours a day. All workmen 
electing to labor only eight hours per day will receive a proportionate reduction of 
their wages. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 
No. 401.— October Term, 1876. 

The United States, Appellants, ) 

vs. >• Appeal from the Court of Claims. 

Arthur Martin. ) 

The act of Congress declaring " that eight hours shall constitute a day's work for all 
laborers or workmen * * employed by or on behalf of the Government of 
the United States," is in the nature of a direction by the United States to its 
agents. 

It is not a contract with laborers to that effect, and does not prevent the officers of 
the Government from making agreements with laborers by which the day's 
labor may be more or less than eight hours. 

The act does not prescribe the amount of compensation to be paid for the labor of 
eight hours or of any other time. 

Where a laborer has been in the habit of working for the Government twelve hours 
a day at a compensation of $2.50 per day, and in answer to his request is 
informed that if he wishes to remain in the service he must continue to work 
twelve hours per day, and receive his pay accordingly, he cannot afterwards 
recover for the additional time over eight hours as a day's labor. 

When an application is made to the defendant for the excess of time over eight hours 
per day, and an allowance is made and the receiver receipts in full for the 
account, this is a bar to any further claim. 

Mr. Justice Hunt delivered the opinion of the Court. 

On the 25th of June, 1868, Congress passed an act (15 Stats., 77) declaring "that 
eight hours shall constitute a day's work for all laborers, workmen, and mechanics 
now employed, or who may hereafter be employed, by or on behalf of the Govern- 
ment of the United States."— (Revised Stats., § 3738.) 

This was a direction by Congress to the officers and agents of the United States, 
establishing the principle to be observed in the labor of those engaged in its service. 
It prescribed the length of time which should amount to a day's work when no 
special agreement was made upon the subject. There are several things which the 
act does not regulate which it may be worth while to notice. 

First. It does not establish the price to be paid for a day's work. Skilled labor 
necessarily commands a higher price than mere manual labor, and whether wages 
are high or low depends chiefly upon the inquiry whether those having labor to be- 
stow are more numerous than those who desire the services of the laborer. The 
English statute books are full of assizes of bread and ale, commencing as early as the 
reign of Henry 2d, and regulations of labor, and many such are to be found in the 
statute, of the several States. It is stated by Adam Smith, as the law in his days, 
that in Sheffield no master cutter or weaver or hatter could have more than two ap- 
prentices at a time, and so lately as the 7 8th Geo. 3d, and which remained unrepealed 
until 1825, an act was passed prohibiting, under severe penalties, all master tailors 
in London, or within five miles of it, from giving, or their workmen from accepting, 
more than two shillings seven pence halfpenny a day, except in the case of general 
mourning.— (Smith's Wealth of Nations, 125, 6 Oxford ed. of 1869.) A different 
theory is now almost universally adopted. Principals, so far as the law can give the 
power, are entitled to employ as many workmen and of whatever degree of skill and 
at whatever price they think fit, and except in some special cases, as of children or 
orphans, the hours of labor and price to be paid are left to the determination of the 
parties interested. The statute of the United States does not interfere with this 
principle. It does not specify any sum which shall be paid for the labor of eight 
hours, nor that the price shall be more when the hours are greater, or less when the 
hours are fewer. It is silent as to everything except the direction to its officers that 
eight hours shall constitute a day's work for a laborer. 

Second. The statute does not provide that the employer and the laborer may not 
agree with each other as to what time shall constitute a day's work. There are some 
branches of labor, connected with furnaces, foundries, steam or gas works, where 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



165 



the labor and the exposure of eight hours a day would soon exhaust the strength of 
a laborer and render him permanently an invalid. The Government officer is not 
prohibited from knowing these facts, nor from agreeing when it is proper that a less 
number of hours than eight shall be accepted as a day's work. Nor does the statute 
intend that where out-of-door labor in the long days of summer may be offered for 
twelve hours at an uniform price, the officer may not so contract with a consenting 
laborer. 

We regard the statute chiefly as in the nature of a direction from a principal to 
his agent, that eight hours is deemed to be a proper length of time for a day's labor, 
and that his contracts shall be based upon that theory. It is a matter between the 
principal and his agent in which a third party has no interest. The proclamation 
of the President and the act of 1872 are in harmony with this view of the statute. 

We are of the opinion, therefore, that contracts fixing or giving a different length 
of time as the day's work are legal and binding upon the parties making them. 

In the case before us the claimant continued his work, after understanding that 
eight hours would not be accepted as a day's labor, but that he must work twelve 
hours, as he had done before. He received his pay of $2.50 a day for the work of 
twelve hours a day, as a calendar day's work during the period in question, without 
protest or objection. At that time ordinary laborers under the same Government 
received but $1.75 per day at the same place, and those engaged in the same depart- 
ment with the claimant in a private establishment, at the same place, received but 
$2 for a day's work of twelve hours, and the finding adds, "they had more work to 
do than the claimant had while similarly employed." The claimant's contract was 
a voluntary and a reasonable one, by which he must now be bound. 

In 1873 the claimant applied for the same arrears of pay as are here in question, 
and received from the auditor an award of $205.63. That amount was paid to the 
claimant, and he receipted in writing in full for the account. This has often been 
held in this court to be a bar to any further claim. — (U. S. vs. Justice, 14 Wal., 535; 
U. S. vs. Child, 12 lb., 232.) 

These principles require a reversal of the judgment of the Court of Claims. The 
case is remanded to the Court of Claims with directions that the petition of the 
claimant be dismissed. 



CIRCULAR NO. 2. 



June 30, 1877. 



Eegulations relating to employes under the cognizance of the Bureau of Construc- 
tion and Repair at the several navy yards are modified as follows : 

There will be a foreman of shipwrights, joiners, smiths, iron-platers, plumbers, 
painters, mast-makers, boat-builders, block-makers, calkers, and laborers. 




Foreman of shipwrights, embracing pattern-makers, borers, and sawyers, will be paid 

Foreman of joiners, embracing cabinet-makers and upholsterers, will be paid 

Foreman of smiths will be paid 

Foreman of iron-platers will be paid 

Foreman of plumbers, embracing founders and galvanizers, will be paid 

Foreman of painters will be paid 

Foreman of mast-makers will be paid . 



§4.50 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 

Foreman of boat-builders will be paid j 4.00 

Foreman of block-makers will be paid 

Foreman of calkers, embracing spinners and scrapers, will be paid 

Superintendent of rolling-mill will be paid 

Foreman of laborers wiltbe paid 

Quarterman in charge of coopers will be paid 

Oakum-maker will be paid 

Superintendent of floating-dock will be paid 



4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
3.20 
3.20 
3.20 
3.20 



So. 50 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 



All foremen, quartermen in charge, and superintendents will attend as closely as 
possible to their men; they will, in all cases, be ready to set them to work at roll- 
call, and see that they do not quit work before bell-ring. 

The sawyer in charge of the mill and shipwright in charge of the mold-loft will be 
paid 50 cents per day more than first-class shipwrights. 

The inspector of timber, where allowed, will be paid $4.20 per diem, except at the 
Washington yard, where the pay will be $3.50 per diem. 

The draughtsman will be paid $5 per diem. The pay of assistant draughtsman, 
■where one is necessary, will be the same as that of first-class shipwrights. 

If, in the judgment of the commandant, the services of a quarterman only is required 
in any department, the case will be referred to the Bureau. 



166 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

But two classes of workmen will be employed in any of the above-named depart- 
ments. 

The pay of quartermen will be 50 cents per day, and the pay of leading-men 24 cents 
per day more than that of first-class workmen in their respective departments, and 
this pay shall not be based upon the pay of special or extra hands. 

To all the above departments there will be not more than one quarterman to 24 
workmen, exclusive of boys, helpers, or assistants of any description. Should it be 
necessary to divide the men into two or more gangs to work in different parts of the 
yard, a leading-man may be temporarily appointed to have charge of not less than 
twelve men. 

No foreman, quarterman in charge, or superintendent, other than those herein 
mentioned, will be allowed. 

A quarterman of shipkeepers will be allowed when they are six or more shipkeepers 
employed, and his pay will be 20 cents per day more than that of ordinary shipkeepers. 

In yards where an assistant naval constructor is on duty, in addition to his other 
work, he will inspect all timber and lumber offered under contract or order, and in 
such yards the position of timber-inspector is abolished. 

When foremen, quartermen in charge, or superintendents shall make extra time, 
they shall be paid for the same as in the case of other men. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 3. 

July 3, 1877. 

Under an opinion of the Attorney General, the Navy Department and Bureaus 
thereof are authorized to use stamped envelopes or official stamps, as they may elect. 

All other offices connected with the Department, either in or out of Washington, 
are not authorized to use stamped envelopes. These, and all others to whom official 
stamps are usually supplied, will be continued to be supplied on requisition made on 
the Secretary of the Navy. 

Stamped envelopes must be procured by the Department or Bureau authorized to 
use them, and it is lawful to transmit, through the mail, free of postage, any letters 
or other matters of the Government of the United States, provided, that every such 
letter or package shall bear over the words " official business" an endorsement, show- 
ing the name of the Department and Bureau, as the case maybe, whence transmitted, 
and the words "Any person using this envelope to avoid the payment of postage on 
private matter of any kind will be subject to a fine of three hundred dollars." 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 4. 

July 3, 1877. 

The Department directs that from and after the first of July, 1877, the percentage 
paid by officers on mess and state-room furniture shall cease. 

No percentage paid by officers previous to that date will be refunded. 
New regulations prescribing the responsibility of officers in using these articles 
will be issued by the Bureau of "Equipment and Recruiting." 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 6. 

July 5, 1877. 

The regulations of the Navy regarding open purchases are hereby modified as fol- 
lows: 

When a public exigency requires the immediate use of articles not on hand or pro- 
curable under existing contract, the commandant of the yard will make requisition 
on the purchasing officer for the same and transmit it to the proper Bureau for 
approval, with a statement of the circumstances and nature of the exigency. 

The Bureau will then decide as to the necessity of open purchase, and, if it approve, 
will return the requisition so approved to the purchasing officer, who will procure 
the articles in the manner prescribed by law. 

The Department directs that when no public exigency exists, all articles, not other- 
wise exempted by law, shall be procured after public advertisement. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 167 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 7. July 6, 1877. 

Paragraph 23, page 130, of the Navy Regulations of 1876, is not in accordance with 
section 178 of the Revised Statutes. 

It provides that communications, orders, &c, of a Bureau shall be signed "by the 
Acting Chief of such Bureau specially appointed by the President, &c, or by the 
Secretary of the Navy, &o." 

This would imply that, in the absence of a Chief, an Acting Chief should be 
appointed by the President; whereas, section 178 provides that in such an event 
the assistant or deputy, "or if there be none, then the Chief Clerk of such Bureau," 
shall perform the duties of Chief, "unless otherwise directed by the President." 

This paragraph, therefore, will be amended so as to read as follows: 

In case of the actual absence of a Chief of a Bureau, the communications, orders, 
bills, requisitions, and papers required to be signed by him shall be signed, by the 
Acting Chief of such Bureau, if one shall be specially appointed by the President; 
but if none such shall be appointed, then the Chief Clerk of such Bureau. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 8. 

August 1, 1877. 
Chaplains whose relative rank is not fixed by law will, in the assignment of quar- 
ters, in the matter of uniform, and in all cases affecting their official status, be 
regarded and treated as having the relative rank of lieutenant. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 228. 

August 1, 1877. 

It is the well-digested policy and intention of the Department, in making assign- 
ments to duty, to assign the senior grades of the service to the higher and more 
important positions. This is what the law contemplates, and reason and propriety 
demand; and.it is most just and fair to all. 

In accordance with this principle, medical and pay inspectors, and chief engineers 
having the relative rank of commander, will be appointed to fill the positions of fleet 
surgeon, fleet paymaster, and fleet engineer; and. the assignments will be made by 
the Department. 

Officers of lower rank at present holding fleet positions will be relieved as early as 
practicable by those of the required rank. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 229. 

August 2, 1877. 
The rank of officers, after confirmation by the Senate, cannot justly be changed by 
the exercise of executive discretion so as to put them on the Register above those of 
the same grade, and the Department will not hereafter exercise this discretion, but 
leave the question, whenever presented, to be decided by Congress. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 230. 

August 3, 1877. 
Vessels in commission, lying in port, held in reserve for sea service and reduced in 
complement, will be considered by the Department as on special shore service, and the 
officers attached thereto "on shore duty." 

Whenever the complement of such vessel is filled, she will be considered as on sea 
service, and her officers on sea duty, until the completion of the cruise, or the reduction 
of the complement, when she will again be considered as on special shore service 
and her officers on shore duty. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 9. 

August 6, 1877. 
The mustering of workmen under paragraph 5, section 16, page 160, of Navy Regu- 
lations, 1876, will be modified to read as follows: 

The bell will be rung for ten minutes before the hour of labor in the morning and 
afternoon, and at the last tap of the bell the mustering of the workmen will com- 
mence. The moment the men are mustered they must proceed to the place of work. 
No workman is to leave his work until the bell rings to knock off. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



168 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



August 14, 1877. 

The act making appropriations for the naval service, approved March 3, 1877, Stat- 
utes at Large, Vol. 19, page 390, provides that "cadet midshipmen during such period 
of their course of instruction as they shall be at sea in other than practice-ships, 
shall each receive as annual pay not exceeding nine hundred and fifty dollars." 

This provision of law applies to cadet midshipmen who have completed the aca- 
demic course pursued at the Naval Academy, but have to perform two years' service 
at sea, or undergo instruction for that period, in other than practice-ships, prior to 
graduating. The class first to come under the operation of this law of March 3, 1877, 
and to receive the maximum of pay on the conditions therein provided, is shown on 
page 45 of the July Navy Register for the current year. 

The term " sea-service," as applied to vessels of the Navy, is defined in General 
Order No. 230. Cadet midshipmen of the class above mentioned, when borne on the 
rolls of vessels (other than practice-ships) on sea-service, as thus defined, will be paid 
at the rate of nine hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 






Circular No. 5. 

Instructions to Commandants of Navy Yards. 

August 18, 1877. 
The labor rolls in the yards must exhibit the actual rating and description of work 
performed by each employe" ; and employe's rated in one capacity must not be em- 
ployed in any other. 
Commandants of navy yards will please give the necessary directions accordingly. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



No. 232. 

October 15, 1877. 

In accordance with the requirements of the Revised Statute of the United States, 
"the titles and grades" of all staff' officers of the Navy shall be inserted in their 
commissions ; and the new commissions specified shall be issued as soon as practica- 
ble, as also required by said Revised Statutes. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular to Yards. 

October 25, 1877. 

The working hours of the several navy yards may be as follows: From March 21 
to September 21, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m.; from September 22 to March 20, 7.40 a. m. to 4.30 
p. m., with the usual intermission of one hour for dinner. This regulation is not 
designed to carry with it any present reduction of pay. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 6. 

November 17, 1877. 

Apothecaries of navy yards, naval stations, and naval hospitals who sign articles 
of agreement, as prescribed by the Navy Regulations, are entitled to the rights and 
privileges of a petty officer of the Navy. 

Their names will accordingly be placed on the books to be paid from the "Pay of 
the Navy." 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 7. 

Disbursing officers in making requisitions to pay officers and men balances due for 
the months of April, May, and June, will draw under the head of "Pay of the Navy 
deficiency, 1877," and in making requisitions for funds to pay other back claims, 
under pay, they will draw under "Pay of the Navy arrearages;" and keep these 
accounts of appropriation separate and distinct upon their books. 

^ R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 169 

General Order, No. 233. 

December 8, 1877. 

The steam launches and cutters furnished to Navy vessels will be employed prin- 
cipally for towing and other ship's purposes, and not for the exclusive use of officers. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



December 12, 1877. 

From and after the first of January next, paymasters' yeomen of the first class will 
be allowed to vessels of the third and fourth rates where no paymaster's clerk is 
allowed. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 10. 

January 15, 1878. 

Owing to the fact that the appointed men in the Navy are debarred from the bene- 
fits accrued or accruing, according to law, as to pensions, &c, to the enlisted men, 
for and during their service, the Department directs that hereafter these appoint- 
ments shall be discontinued, and that men shall, under all circumstances, be selected 
as heretofore for these ratings, and then enlisted in them. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 235. 

February 9, 1878. 
General Order No. 164 is modified by omitting the words "at sea," so as to read: 
Assistant surgeons shall hereafter not be examined for promotion until they shall 
have served two years on board a public vessel of the United States. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Orders, No. 236. 

February 23, 1878. 
In connection with the complete descriptive muster rolls required to be forwarded 
to the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting upon sailing, quarterly thereafter, and 
upon the expiration of the cruise, commanding officers are directed to forward to 
the Bureau, before sailing from port to port, a report showing all changes to that 
date not previously reported, which have occurred among the petty officers and 
enlisted men under their command. 

Blanks will be furnished by the Bureau ef Equipment and Recruiting. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 237. 

March 12, 1878. 
The following regulations will be observed hereafter in regard to disrating and 
reducing in rating non-commissioned officers of the Marine Corps, and in filling 
vacancies caused thereby: 

1. Non-commissioned officers of a marine guard of a vessel shall not be reduced in 
rating, except to the next inferior one, and in pursuance of a sentence of a court- 
martial, as a punishment for offence or offences committed; nor shall they be dis- 
rated except, under similar process, for incompetency, in accordance with the laws 
for the government of the Navy, Articles, 24, 30, and 31. 

2. When a vacancy is thus created, or occurs by death or discharge, out of the United 
States, the commanding officer of the guard, if there be one, shall recommend, or if 
there be none, the commanding officer of the vessel shall designate, some one of the 
guard for promotion to the vacancy, and the commanding officer of the vessel shall 
appoint a board, to consist of the commanding officer of the guard, when there is one, 
one line officer, and one staff officer, to examine the person so designated, under the 
regulations herein prescribed, as to his qualifications for promotion ; and if reported 
qualified, the promotion shall be made by the commanding officer of the vessel, the 
appointment to continue until the termination of the cruise, unless vacated upon a 
similar recommendation or designation, and by similar authority as under which 
appointed. If there is no commanding officer of the guard, an additional line officer 
will be put on the board. 



170 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

3. When a vacancy occurs from the causes stated in paragraphs 1 and 2, in the 
guard of a vessel in the United States, the Commandant of the Corps, upon the recom- 
mendation of the commanding officer of the guard, approved by the commanding 
officer of the vessel, shall promote some one of the guard to fill it, if there is a suit- 
able one (after examination as above), and shall issue a printed warrant; otherwise 
he may fill it by the transfer of a non-commissioned officer from some other quarter. 

4. Non-commissioned officers of the Marine Corps serving on shore in the United 
States shall not be reduced, except with the approval of the Commandant of the 
'Corps, or the sentence of a court-martial, and no enlisted man serving on shore shall 
be promoted to be a non-commissioned officer except upon the recommendation of 
the commanding marine officer and the report of a board of two officers of the Marine 
Corps, to be ordered by the commandant of the station, whose report shall be for- 
warded to the Commandant of the Corps for his approval, who shall thereupon issue 
a warrant. 

5. The examination of privates to be corporals shall consist of reading, writing, 
and the simple rules of arithmetic, a knowledge of the duties of a corporal and of the 
school of the soldier and company; for corporals to be sergeants, the same, with the 
addition of a knowledge of keeping the necessary accounts and making out muster- 
rolls, instructions for skirmishers, and the duties of a sergeant. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

TJ. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 11. 

March 14, 1878. 
Section III and Section IV, Chapter XXIII, of Navy Regulations, are hereby an- 
nulled, and the follow ing is substituted therefor : 

Section III. — Captain of the Yard. 

1. There shall be attached to each navy yard a captain of the yard, who, under 
Section 1469, Revised Statutes, will be the aid or executive of the Commandant, and 
who in the absence of the Commandant will act in his stead. 

2. He will have special charge of the police and the enforcement of police regula- 
tions; of the fire and other tugs, and will direct the fire department ; of all fires and 
ilights in the workshops, and after working hours he will satisfy himself that there 
is no danger of fire through the night. 

3. He will have charge of the walks and grounds, of moving and mooring vessels, 
and will. visit and observe all parts of the navy yard and its establishments, and 
make such reports as will enable the Commandant to be fully informed as to the 
working of the various parts of the station under his command. 

4. A regular journal will be kept under his direction, which he will sign daily and 
submit monthly to the Commandant for his approval. In it shall be entered the time 
when all officers report for duty at or shall be detached from the yard, when any 
vessel is received for repairs or put in commission, the number of mechanics and 
•others employed, the arrival and departure of all vessel s-of-war, and of vessels with 
stores of any kind for the yard, the time when any vessel is taken into or removed 
from the dock, the state of the wind or weather, as well as the barometer and ther- 
mometer, and the other principal transactions of the yard. 

5. He will cause to be scrutinized all articles and packages passing into or out of 
the yard. All which may be suspected are to be stopped and examined, when, if 
found to be of an important character, they are to be detained and a report made to 
the Commandant. Each morning all passes presented at the gate during the pre- 
ceding day will be delivered to the captain of the yard for inspection and report. 

6. Should the captain of the yard be absent, his duties will be performed by the 
line officer next in rank. 

7. Other line officers, of inferior rank, may be attached to the yards as subordinate 
aids to the Commandant, for the purpose of assisting the aid or executive, and for 
general experience and observation in the duties of their profession. 

Section IV. 
An officer not above the grade of commander shall be detailed to perform the duties 
of equipment officer. 

The office of aid to Commandant, at present existing, shall he abolished from the date 
of the receipt of this regulation. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 12. 

March 14, 1878. 
Article 6, Section XVI, of Chapter XXIII, page 160 of the U. S. Navy Regulations, 
is hereby changed by striking out the words u of the line" in the first line of the article, 



(iExN'ERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 171 

so that it will read: "A cheek-officer, who is to be a commissioned officer, is to be 
present at each mustering office or station whenever a muster takes place, <fcc, &c." 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 8. 

March 21, 1878. 

The following is hereby substituted, to take effect from this date, for the Circular 
of October 25, 1877, in relation to the working-hours at the several navy yards and 
shore stations: 

The working hours will be — 
From March 21 to September 21, from 7 a. m. to 6 p. m.; 

From September 22 to March 20, from 7.40 a. m. to 4.30 p. m., with the usual inter- 
mission of one hour for dinner. 

The Department will contract for the labor of mechanics, foremen, leading-men, 
and laborers on the basis of eight hours a day. All workmen electing to labor ten 
hours a day will receive a proportionate increase of their wages. 

The Commandants will notify the men employed, or to be employed, of these con- 
ditions, and they are at liberty to continue or accept employment under them or not. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular No. 9. 

March 23, 1878. 

Commanding officers of vessels in offering rewards for the apprehension and deliv- 
ery of stragglers or deserters from their respective commands shall distinctly state, 
in the offer of reward, that it will only be paid for the apprehension and delivery of 
the offender on board some United States vessel within the limits of the port in which 
the man deserted, and within three months from date of offer. 

Commanding officers of vessels at naval stations within the United States are never 
to receive on board stragglers or deserters from other vessels, unless so ordered by 
the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 10. 

May 6, 1878. 

The Third Assistant Postmaster General has called the attention of the Depart- 
ment to the fact that unclaimed foreign letters addressed to persons in, or formerly 
in, the naval service, which have been returned to the Dead-Letter Office, have had 
the postage stamps removed from them, thus often rendering it difficult to determine 
the country of mailing. 

The removal of postage stamps from letters by persons employed in the postal ser- 
vice is a penal offence, and it should not be done by any one connected with the Navy 
Department or the naval service, and all such will avoid violating either the letter 
or the spirit of the law on this subject. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

May 16, 1878. 
In consequence of the representations by the Bureau of Navigation of the losses, 
injuries, and extra labor through the loaning of flags, none will be loaned in the 
future without the written order of the Department. 

The Department will confine itself, in giving orders for this purpose, to occasions 
of national celebrations and to others of general interest to the public. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 238. 

June 18, 1878. 

In pursuance of the provisions of the act of Congress approved May 4, 1878, 
making appropriations for the naval service, the appointments of all secretaries and 
-clerks, from civil life, to commanders of squadrons and vessels of the United States 
Navy, in the waters or ports of the United States, on the first day of July, 1878, will 
•cease on that day, and such secretaries and clerks will be allowed mileage to their 
actual homes or residences. 

The appointments of secretaries and clerks, from civil life, on vessels out of the 
waters or ports of the United States on and after the first day of July, 1878, will 



172 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

cease on the arrival of the vessels on which they are serving within the waters or 
ports of the United States, and such secretaries and clerks will be allowed mileage 
to their actual homes or residences. 

E. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

July 2, 1878. 

1. All matters submitted to the Secretary of the Navy involving questions of law 
or regulations will be referred by him or by the chief clerk of the Department, act- 
ing under his order, to the proper Rureau, or clerk, for the ascertainment and report 
of the facts in the case, and on the receipt of a written report of the facts the Secre- 
tary of the Navy will refer the matter to the acting Judge Advocate for a report on 
the question of law, or regulation, which may be involved. 

2. All summary and general courts-martial will.be briefed by the proper clerk and 
laid before the acting Judge Advocate for examination, report, and recomendation 
to the Secretary of the Navy. 

3. Reports of examining and retiring boards will be referred to the acting Judge 
Advocate for report to the Secretary of the Navy, whether they are correct in form 
and substance, and whether the evidence sustains the finding. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 13. 

August 14, 1878. 

On board of all vessels of the Navy the marine officer in command of the marine 

guard will occupy the fourth room from forward, on the port side of the ward-room. 

All other marine officers will be assigned quarters in accordance with their rank. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

September 21, 1878. 

The change in the working hours which goes into effect on the 22d instant will 
not involve any reduction of pay. The employes will be paid the same as if they 
could work the full length of time that the working hours in the spring and sum- 
mer permit them to do. 

R. W. SHUFELDT, 

Acting Secretary of Navy. 



Circular. 

October 3, 1878. 

To preserve uniformity in making out the quarterly schedule of wages at the navy 
yards, it is hereby ordered that there shall be four rates of pay provided for in said 
schedules. This order to take effect from the first instant. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 239. 

November 1, 1878. 

In cases where enlisted men of the Marine Corps on board vessels in the United 
States are to be discharged from the service by reason of sentence of court-martial, 
or other cause, they will be transferred to the nearest marine barracks for that pur- 
pose, and the staff returns forwarded at once to the Commandant of the Marine 
Corps at Washington, D. C, who will, when notified by the Secretary of the Navy, 
prepare and issue the discharge in accordance with the sentence of the court, or as 
the circumstances may require. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 240. 

November 23, 1878. 

Hereafter the state-rooms opening into the ward-room country of all vessels of the 
Navy shall be occupied by officers attached to the vessel, as follows: 

On the starboard side, the forward room shall be occupied by the senior line offi- 
cer, and the next room by the navigator. All other rooms on the starboard side 
shall be occupied by line officers according to rank. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 173 

On the port side, the forward-room shall be occupied by the senior engineer officer 
in charge of the engineer's department; the next room by the pay officer in charge 
of the pay department ; the next room by the senior medical officer in charge of the 
medical department; and the next room by the senior marine officer. All other 
rooms on the port side shall be occupied by officers entitled to quarters on the port 
.side, according to rank. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 14. 

November 29, 1878. 

As there seems to be some misapprehension, or misunderstanding, as to the true 
force and construction of the regulations regarding purchases by the purchasing 
pay officers upon-open purchase requisitions, the Department deems it necessary to 
renew and reissue its instructions on that subject. 

All such purchases must be made either by the Secretary of the Navy, the chiefs 
of bureaus, or the purchasing paymaster at the station. This authority does not 
extend to the officers representing the Bureaus at any yard or station. 

Articles to be purchased on open-purchase requisition are subjected to inspection 
by the proper inspecting officer or officers, but the latter are not to purchase them. 
The purchasing agent or officer will procure them on requisition on him and be 
responsible that they are obtained at the lowest market price. 

The approval of a requisition by a Chief of Bureau, and the transmission of it to 
the officer representing that Bureau at any navy yard or station, will not give valid- 
ity to the purchase unless it be made by the purchasing paymaster. 

Where there is an immediate necessity for medicines, or surgical instruments, for 
the proper selection of which the services of an expert are absolutely essential, these 
regulations can be waived, and the officer representing the Bureau of Medicine and 
Surgery may make the purchase, and will certify the facts on the triplicate bills be- 
fore payment. The term " medicines," herein used, will not include liquors, or med- 
ical stores generally. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 15. 

December 5, 1878. 

Paragraph 10, Section II, Chapter XI, of Navy Regulations, is hereby annulled, 
and the following is substituted therefor : 

If a petty officer or person of inferior rating, entitled to wear a good-conduct 
badge, commits an offence for which the commanding officer considers he should be 
punished by the forfeiture of one or more badges, with the privileges attached there- 
to, such offence is to be inquired into by a board, of not less than three officers, ap- 
pointed by the commandyig officer, and the offender may be deprived of one or more 
of such badges, with the accompanying privileges, in accordance with the finding of 
the board, if such finding is approved by the convening authority. By subsequent 
very good conduct during one year, on recommendation of his commanding officer, 
the offender may be granted one good-conduct badge; and the other badges and 
privileges of which he may have been deprived may be reconferred by subsequent 
service of one year between the bestowal of each badge ; provided that his conduct 
has been very good during the intervals. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

December 6, 1878. 
Department's Circular of June 5, 1871, is so far modified that the concluding pro- 
vision, which limits the extra compensation of seamen, ordinary seamen, or lands- 
men, serving in the engineer's force as firemen and coal-heavers, will not be regarded 
as in force from and after this date. 

R, W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 16. 

December 30, 1878. 
Paragraph 22, page 15, Navy Regulations, 1876, is hereby annulled. 
Upon the arrival of a United States vessel-of-war at any navy yard or station 
within the limits of the United States, the junior officer, whether in command ashore 
or afloat, shall make the first visit of ceremony. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy, 



174 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

• 

Circular. 

December 30, 1878. 
The officers of the Navy and Marine Corps will assemble at the Navy Department 
at 11 o'clock a. m. on Wednesday, January 1, 1879, in full-dress uniform for occasions 
of special ceremony, to pay their respects to the President of the United States at 
12 o'clock. 

They will form in the Navy Department, under the direction of the senior officer 
present, and will, in a body, wait upon the President. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 17. 

January 18, 1879. 
In addition to the instructions in paragraph 96, page 45, Navy Regulations, 1876, 
in relation to " care of iron vessels," the following order will be observed : The inner 
surface of the plating will be examined semi-annually, and thoroughly scraped and 
painted where necessary. Special care is to be taken to remove all rust before apply- 
ing the paint. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 241. 

February 12, 1879. 
Commanders-in-chief of squadrons will issue the necessary orders requiring a 
statement of the amount of each bill made by any vessel under their command, to 
be forwarded immediately upon its payment to the Bureau to which it is properly 
chargeable. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order r No. 242. 

February 24, 1879. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular No. 14, dated November 29, 1878, was intended to 
apply to all stations and squadrons at home and abroad. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

March 21, 1879. 

The attention of disbursing officers of the Navy is invited to the following circu- 
lar from the Treasury Department, relating to the issue of the United States 
refunding certificates under the act of February 26, 1879. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

18 79 —Department No. 42.— Secretary's Office, 

Treasury Department, 

Washington, D. C, March 12, 1879. 

The Secretary of the Treasury calls attention to the four per cent, refunding cer- 
tificates of the United States to be issued under the following provisions of the act 
of Cono-ress approved February 26, 1879, entitled "An Act to authorize the issue of 
certificates of deposit in aid of the refunding of the public debt," to wit : 

That the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized and directed to issue, in 
exchange for lawful money of the United States that may be presented for such 
exchange, certificates of deposits, of the denomination often dollars, bearing interest 
at the rate of four per centum per annum, and convertible at any time, with accrued 
interest, into the four per centum bonds described in the refunding act ; and the 
money so received shall be applied only to the payment of the bonds bearing inter- 
est at a rate of not less than five per centum in the mode prescribed by said act, and 
he is authorized to prescribe suitable rules and regulations in conformity with this 
act. 

Each certificate will be of the denomination of ten (10) dollars; will be made 
nearly of the form and size of a United States note; and will bear on its face and 
back the conditions of its issue, as follows : 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 175 

[ On the Face.~\ 

United States Refunding Certificate. 

TEN DOLLARS. 

April 1, 1879. 

This certifies that the sum of TEN DOLLARS has been deposited with the Treas- 
urer of the United States, under act of February 26, 1879. 

Jas. Gilfillan, 

Treasurer of the United States. 
G. W. Scofield, 

Washington, D. C. Eegister of the Treasury. 

Convertible, with accrued interest, at 4 per cent, per annum, into four per cent, 
bonds of the United States, issued under the acts of July 14, 1870, and January 20 r 
1871, upon presentation at the office of the Treasurer of the United States, Washing- 
ton, D. C, in sums of $50, or multiples thereof. 

[ On the Back.] 

Interest on this note will accrue as follows : 

For each 9 days, or l-10th of a quarter 1 cent. 

For each quarter year .__ 10 cents. 

For each entire year . 40 cents. 

Such certificates will be sold for lawful money, at par and accruing interest to the 
date of purchase, by the Treasurer of the United States at Washington, and by the 
Assistant Treasurers at Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, New Orleans, New 
York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and San Francisco, and by all national banks, post- 
masters, and other officers of the Government who may be authorized to sell them : 
and the Treasurer of the United States at Washington, and the Assistant Treasurer 
at New York, will also receive in payment drafts in favor of themselves, respectively, 
drawn on New York, which will be collected, and the excess, if any, returned by 
check to the depositors. 

The Treasurer of the United States will also accept in payment certificates of de- 
posit of national banks specially designated to receive deposits on this account, but 
the refunding certificates will not be delivered until the certificate of deposit issued 
by the bank has been paid for by a treasury draft, or by a deposit of a like amount 
of lawful money with the Treasurer or some Assistant Treasurer of the United 
States, or until United States bonds of equal amount are substituted in their stead. 

All collectors of the customs, surveyors of the customs acting also as collectors, 
receivers of public moneys, postmasters of money-order offices, and all other public 
officers of whatsoever character, are invited to become agents for the sale of these 
certificates. Any such officer who may request to be thus employed will be promptly 
designated by the Secretary of the Treasury as a depositary for that purpose, 
under the provisions of section 3639, Revised Statutes of the" United States, and 
upon his filing a satisfactory bond he will receive from the Department a supply of 
the certificates for sale, not to exceed in amount at any one time the penalty of "the 
bond, which should not be less than $1,000. A blank bond to be executed will be 
transmitted with the letter of designation. 

All national banks, upon complying with section 5133, Revised Statutes of the 
United States, are also invited to become financial agents of the Government, and 
depositaries of public moneys accruing from the sale of these certificates. The 
money received by depositary banks for such certificates will remain on deposit 
with said banks, subject to the order of the Treasurer of the United States, and calls 
for the redemption of bonds will issue from time to time as the Secretary may direct. 

A commission of one-eighth of one per cent, will be allowed on the sale of these 
certificates to officers other than the Treasurer and Assistant Treasurers, and a like 
commission to banks and others purchasing them directly of the Treasurer or some 
Assistant Treasurer of the United States, provided such sales or purchases by the 
party claiming the commission shall aggregate not less than $1,000 within any one 
calendar month, and a party purchasing at one time $1,000 or more of the certi- 
ficates will be entitled to receive them free of charge for transportation to any point 
on an established express line. 

Commissions will be paid at the Department by check on New York. 

The certificates will be ready for delivery April 1, 1879, at which date they begin 
to bear interest, which will be payable upon the conversion of the certificates into 
four per cent, bonds, but subscriptions may be made at once. 

Certificates will also be issued under this law, whenever requested, similar in form 
and upon similar conditions to those above described, to be registered on the books 
of the Treasury in the name of the owner, which name will also be entered on the 
face of the certificate. 

JOHN SHERMAN, 

Secretary. 



176 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 18. 

March 26, 1879. 

I. Officers detailed for duty on general court-martial or courts of inquiry are, 
while so serving, exempt from other duty, except in cases of emergency, to he judged 
of hy the commanding officer, who will at once communicate with the officer order- 
ing the court, assigning the reasons for his action. 

II. When a general court-martial, or court of inquiry adjourns without day, or 
for a period of more than two days, the presiding officer of the court will report the 
fact to the commanding officer of the station, and the officers of the court, attached 
to the station, will he liable to other duty during that time. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Circular. 

April 12, 1879. 
A hoard of officers will he organized, in conformity with the joint resolution of 
Congress, for the relief of Bushrod B. Taylor and other naval officers, approved Feb- 
ruary 5, 1879, for the purpose of examining into the cases of such officers of the Navy 
as did not have opportunity, from any cause whatever, to appear before the board 
created by virtue of the joint resolution of July 1, 1870, who deem themselves 
unjustly passed over by the promotions made in conformity with the act of Congress, 
approved July 25, 1866. 

The board will be ordered to convene at the Navy Department on Thursday, the 
first day of May, 1879, and all officers concerned are hereby notified that they can 
present their claims for consideration by the board either in person, by counsel, or 
in writing addressed to the " President of Special Board of Examiners, Navy Depart- 
ment." 

Such officers as desire to present their claims for examination will, without delay, 
make application to the president of the board, who will inform them when their 
cases will be considered. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

The following is a copy of the joint resolution referred to: 

Joint Resolution for the relief of Bushrod B. Taylor and other Naval Officers. 

Be it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to organ- 
ize a board of three officers not below the grade of rear-admiral, who shall examine 
into the case of Commander Bushrod B. Taylor and such other officers of the Navy 
as did not have opportunity from any cause whatever to appear before the board 
created by virtue of the joint resolution of July first, eighteen hundred and seventy, 
as may deem themselves unjustly passed over by the promotions made in conformity 
with the act of Congress approved July twenty -fifth, eighteen hundred and sixty- 
six, and such officers shall have the right to appear in person and present to such 
board their cause of grievance. The board so organized shall report their conclu- 
sions to the Secretary of the Navy, who shall report the same to Congress. 

Approved, February 5, 1879. 



Circular No. 11. 

April 24, 1879. 
Under the recent acts of Congress, and the opinion of the Assistant Attorney Gen- 
eral for the Post Office 'Department thereon, relative to the transmission, after May 
1, 1879, within the United States, of official mail matter free of postage, the follow- 
ing privileges are allowed : 

1. The official or Department postage stamps can be used to prepay postage on 
official mail matter. 

2. The same stamps can be used to prepay registry fees on official mail matter. 

3. Official mail matter can be transmitted under cover of the penalty envelope from 
officers of the Government to private individuals. 

4. The official postage* stamps can be enclosed by Government officers to private 
individuals for the purpose of prepaying the postage on answers to official commu- 
nications. The penalty envelopes cannot be sent to private individuals for such 
purpose, as officers of the Government can only use such envelopes. 

5. Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps can send official mail matter between 
themselves, or to any of the Executive Departments, by using the penalty envelope. 

6. The penalty envelope, in addition to having the words " official business" there- 
on, will have the name of the office from which sent, or the signature and rank of 
the officer by whom sent, and the following endorsement: 

"Any person using this envelope to avoid the payment of postage on private matter 
of any kind will be subject to a fine of three hundred dollars." 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 177 

7. The endorsement required on the penalty envelope may he printed, impressed 
with a stamp^or written. 

8. In prepaying postage to foreign countries the ordinary postage stamps must he 
used. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
Secretary of the Nary. 

Circular relating to the Enlistment of Boys in the V. S. Naval Service. 

May 31, 1879. 

The circular of April 8, 1875, relating to the enlistment of hoys in the U. S. naval 
service, is hereby rescinded, and the following substituted, in accordance with the 
amendments to the Revised Statutes of the United States, approved May 12, 1879, 
to wit: 

'■ Section 1418. Boys between the ages of fifteen and eighteen years may he enlisted 
to serve in the Navy until they shall arrive at the age of twenty-one years, &c, &c." 

•■ Section 1419. Minors between the ages of fifteen and eighteen years shall not be 
enlisted for the naval service without the consent of their parents or guardians." 

•'Section 1420. No minor under the age of fifteen years, no insane or intoxicated per- 
son, and no deserter from the naval or military service of the United States, shall be 
enlisted in the naval service." 

These boys wall be sent on board of suitable vessels, to be trained for the naval 
service, under the following regulations: 

Every boy previous to being enlisted must satisfy the Examining Board of Officers — 

That'he is of robust frame, intelligent, of perfectly sound and healthy constitution, 
free from any physical defects or malformation, and not subject to fits. 

That he is able to read and write. 

In special cases, where the boy shows a general intelligence, and is otherwise quali 
fied, the examining board, if they think fit, may enlist him, notwithstanding his 
knowledge of reading and writing is imperfect. 

That his height and measure are sufficient, being as follows: 



Age. 


Height. 


1 
Weight ! (Jhost measurement— 
MeigUr - breathing naturally. 


Fifteen years 

Sixteen years 

Seventeen years 

Eighteen years 


4 feet 11 inches 

5 feet 1 inch 

5 feet 2 inches 

5 feet 3 inches 


85 pounds 'iT'o inches. 

90 pounds > 28 inches. 

100 pounds 29 inches. 

110 pounds , 30 inches. 

i 



Each boy upon presenting himself for enlistment must be accompanied by his 
father, or by his mother in case the father be deceased, or by his legally-appointed 
guardian in case he has no father nor mother, their signature being required on the 
Shipjnng Articles to perfect the enlistment. 

The parent or guardian, however, who by reason of distance, infirmity, or other 
causes, cannot accompany the son or ward to the place of enlistment, will be fur- 
nished, on written application to the commanding officer of either of the training- 
ships or other vessels upon which enlistments are made, with duplicates of a printed 
form of declaration, oath, &c, by which the enlistment will be perfected, should the 
boy be accepted by the board of examining officers. 

All expenses of travel must be paid by the candidates, whether accepted or not. 

The Board of Examining Officers will consist of the captain, a line officer, and the 
senior medical officer of the vessel. 

If the examining officers are of the opinion that the boy is in every respect fit for 
the service, the engagement to serve continuously in the service until twenty-one 
years of age is to be read and explained to him, and if he voluntarily agrees to its 
terms, he is then, in the presence of a witness, to sign the agreement and be enlisted. 
, The examining officers will fill up the form and certificate attached to the engage- 
ment and transmit it to the Department. 

The education of the boys will comprise the elements of an ordinary English edu- 
cation, alternating with practical seamanship and other professional occupations 
designed to prepare them for sailors in the Navy. . 

The prime object is to place in the naval service, with the consent of their parents, 
such good and deserving boys as will elevate its standard and make the Navy more 
reliable as an arm of the national defence. Boys who have been convicted of crime 
cannot, therefore, be received, as it is not advisable that they should become the 
associates of the better class. 

The boys will be enlisted as third-class boys, at the rate of $9.50 per month and 
one ration. While serving on the training-ships they may, if deserving, be promoted 
12 



178 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

to the rating of second and first-class boys, at the pay of $10.50 and $11.50 per mouth, 
respectively, and on cruising vessels will be entitled to higher ratings, at the discre- 
tion of their commanding officers, as a reward of proficiency and good conduct. 

They will be furnished an outfit of clothing, the cost of which will be charged to 
their respective accounts, or the parents may purchase the necessary outfit from the 
paymaster of the ship themselves, and give to their sons. 

Boys enlisted to serve until twenty-one years of age will not be permitted to allot 
any part of their pay to parents or guardians, nor will they be allowed to draw any 
money from the paymaster for this purpose. 

They will be allowed to draw monthly, from the paymaster of the ship, one dollar 
for pocket-money, if out of debt, and will be allowed liberty to go on shore at the 
discretion of the commanding officer. 

They will be transferred to sea-going vessels as they become proficient, accompanied 
by the certificate of their commanding officer as to their conduct and qualifications. 

If recommended for honorable discharge upon the expiration of their enlistments, 
they will receive continuous-service certificates, which will entitle them to three 
months' extra pay of their rating when discharged, and to the addition of one dollar 
per month to their pay, provided they re-enlist under such certificates for three years 
within three months from the dates thereof. 

Boys will not be discharged from the service until they have reached twenty-one 
years of age, except upon a medical survey, inaptitude for the service, or for miscon- 
duct. 

Those injured in the service, or having contracted a disease in the line of duty, 
will be entitled to the benefits of a pension. 

These boys will be under the immediate supervision of the Bureau of Equipment 
and Recruiting, Navy Department, and applications for enlistment will be made to 
the Chief of that Bureau, or to the commanding officers of the following-named train- 
ing-ships, to wit: U. S. steamer " Minnesota " at New London, Conn., U. S. ship 
11 Saratoga' 7 and U. S. ship "Portsmouth" at Washington, D. C, and the U. S. ship 
" Constitution" where stationed from time to time, and such other vessels as may be 
designated for this service. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular to Yards. 

June 3, 1879. 

It is the desire of the Department that the Commandant of the Marine Corps, when 
upon an official visit, shall receive the same salute as is prescribed by the Navy Reg- 
ulations, page 12, par. 17, for Chiefs of Bureaus of the Navy Department. 
Very respectfully, 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 19. 

June 4, 1879. 

I. Article 32, of Articles for the Government of the Navy, is so construed that 
sentences by summary courts-martial which involve loss of pay are deemed to be such 
as deprive the offender of pay in stated terms of amount; and that " disrating" alone 
is not, within the meaning of the law, to be regarded as involving loss of pay, but as 
a reduction of rating only; and such sentences of " disrating," without the addition 
of loss of pay, can be carried into execution when approved by the officer ordering 
the court and the commander-in-chief, or, in his absence, by the senior officer present, 
without reference to the Secretary of the Navy for his approval. Section 42, of 
" Orders, regulations, and instructions for the administration of law and justice in 
the U. S. Navy," is therefore modified accordingly. 

II. In cases where summary courts-martial may impose the sentence of " depriva- 
tion of liberty on shore on foreign stations," the duration of such punishment should 
not exceed the limit of the power given to such courts, — which courts are limited by 
law to punishments not exceeding three months' duration. Hereafter such sentences 
will be graduated to periods within the limit of three months. 

III. Whenever a person, convicted by summary court-martial, shall be sentenced 
for any period exceeding ten days to confinement on diminished rations, or on bread 
and water, there must appear on the face of the record of the proceedings the certifi- 
cate of the senior medical officer present to the effect that such sentence will not be 
seriously injurious to the health of the prisoner. Courtswill exercise care and dis- 
cretion in resorting to this punishment, and not award it in any case for a longer 
period, consecutively, than five days. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 179 

General Ordek, No. 243. 

June 12, 1879. 

Vessels of the Navy hereafter fitted out will have sky-sail poles from four feet to 
seven feet in length. 

The Department's order on this subject, of September 14, 1869, is hereby rescinded. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 241. 

June 13, 1879. 
In the event of a vacancy occurring on a foreign station, the commander-in-chief 
may order the senior medical, senior pay, or senior engineer officer, to perform the 
duty of fleet surgeon, fleet paymaster, or fleet engineer, respectively, unless from 
disability, or other good cause, it should be found necessary to select another officer 
of the same or of a lower grade for that duty. 

Hereafter no officer shall be entitled to the pay of fleet surgeon, fleet paymaster, 
or fleet engineer, unless he shall have been specially designated or ordered as such 
bv the Secretary of the Navy. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 

General Order, No. 245. 

July 1, 1879. 
Paymasters' yeomen will not, hereafter, be required to sign the " Shipping Arti- 
cles." They will be appointed by the paymaster, subject to the approval of the com- 
manding officer, and will be entered on the ship's books upon taking the oath of 
allegiance and signing an agreement to serve faithfully for the cruise ; to be amenable 
to the laws, regulations, and discipline of the service and of the ship, and to be dis- 
charged, in case of misbehavior, in any port, foreign or domestic, without claim for 
passage money, on the approval of the commanding officer. 

R, W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 

General Order, No. 246. 

July 22, 1879. 
Medals of honor are hereby awarded David M. Buchanan and John Hay den, 
apprentices U. S. Navy, for the gallant conduct displayed by them in saving human 
life, as per the following commendatory report from Commander R. D. Evans, com- 
manding the U. S. Training Ship " Saratoga." 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 

U. S. S. ''Saratoga" (Third Rate), 

New London, Conn., July 19, 1879. 
Sir : On the morning of July 15, while this vessel was anchored off the Battery, New York Harbor, Robert 
Lee Robey, apprentice boy, fell overboard from the after part of the ship, and as the tide was running strong 
ebb at the time, he, not being an expert swimmer, was in considerable danger. David M. Buchanan, appren- 
tice, instantly sprang over the rail after him, without hesitating an instant to remove even a portion of his 
clothing. John Hayden, apprentice, stripped himself and stood coolly watching the two in the water, and 
when he thought his services were required, made a dive and came up alongside of them and assisted them 
till all three were picked up by a boat 'from the ship. 

Such conduct on the part of lads of their age promises well for their future usefulness to the service, and I 
beg that you will give them such commendation as you may deem proper. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. D. EVANS, 
Commander U. S. N., Commanding. 
Hon. R. W. Thompson, 

Secretary of the Navy, 

Washington, D. C. 



Circular No. 12. 

August 30, 1879. 
The Board of Inspectors ordered by Circular No. 1, of June 22, 1877, will see that 
the quantity, as well as the quality, of the material offered for inspection is correct; 
and in this they will be assisted by the store clerk of the department whose material 
is to be inspected. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



180 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 20. 

September 4, 1879. 
Paragraphs 12 and 14, Chapter XII, of Navy Regulations, "are hereby annulled, and 
the following are substituted therefor : 

I. Each mess of officers will select a caterer, who will have charge of all matters 
relating to the proper service in and expenditures of the mess. He will keep an 
account of all receipts and expenditures, from which an abstract of the financial 
condition of the mess may at any time be ascertained. At the close of each month 
he will render to the mess a statement of the account of the mess, with his receipts, 
expenditures, and balance on hand, if any, together with any bills remaining unpaid. 
He is to incur no indebtedness which cannot be discharged by the funds appropri- 
ated for the mess, and he will see that all bills are paid before leaving a port. If, 
however, from the unexpected sailing of the vessel, or from circumstances beyond 
his control, he is forced to leave any bills unpaid, he will report the number and 
amount to the commanding officer, who will take measures to have them paid as 
soon as possible. 

II. All officers, not commanding, ranking above the grade of ensign, and all officers 
in charge of departments, are ward-room officers. Those ranking with and below the 
grade of ensign are steerage officers, excepting the warrant officers, who will form a 
mess by themselves. 

In all officers' messes the senior line officer present shall preside and have the power 
to interfere at any time to prevent disorder or unrestrained breaches of decorum. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



'Circular to Commandants of Navy Yards. 

September 13, 1879. 
It is hereby ordered that when the pay officer of a navy yard has occasion to go to 
a public depository for money to make his monthly or semi-monthly payments, and 
a conveyance is necessary, he shall be allowed the use of the navy yard carriage, if 
there is one in service at the yard — thus obviating the employment of some other con- 
vevance at public expense. 

WILLIAM N. JEFFERS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 247. 

October 23, 1879. 

The following act of Congress, approved March 16, 1878, is published for the infor- 
mation of the naval service : 

AN ACT to make persons charged with crimes and offences competent witnesses in the United States and 

Territorial Courts. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Rouse, of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That in the trial of all indictments, informations, complaints, 
and other proceedings against persons charged with the commission of crimes, 
offences, and misdemeanors, in the United States courts, Territorial courts, and 
courts-martial, and courts of inquiry, in any State or Territory, including the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, the person so charged shall, at his own request but not other- 
wise, be a competent witness. And his failure to make such request shall not 
create any presumption against him. 

J * R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Order. 

November 17, 1879. 

By direction of the President, the Navy Department will be closed on Wednesday, 
the '19th instant, to enable its employes to participate in the ceremonies attending 
the unveiling of the statue of the late General George H. Thomas. 

R.'W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

December 30, 1879. 

The officers of the Navy and Marine Corps will assemble at the Navy Department 
at 11.30 o'clock a. m. on "Thursday, January 1, 1880, in full-dress uniform, for occa- 
sions of special ceremony, to pay their respects to the President of the United States 
at 12 o'clock. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 181 

They will form in the Navy Department, under the direction of the senior officer 
present, and will, in a body, wait upon the President of the United States. 

R. \V. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



V. s. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 21. 

• January 10,1880. 

I. Clerks to pay officers of the Navy, authorized by sections 1386, 1387, and 1388 of 
the Revised Statutes, will be appointed in the manner prescribed by the Navy Regu- 
lations, and have the relative rank of midshipman. 

II. In accepting appointments said clerks shall be required to bind themselves to 
be subject to such laws and regulations for the government and discipline of the Navy 
as are. or that maybe, enacted by Congress or established by other competent author- 
ity. The acceptance will be accompanied by the oath of office prescribed by law. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 248. 

February 12, 1880. 

The attention of the Department has been called to the importance of establishing 
a correct and general understanding of the signals struck upon the engine-room gong 
for the guidance of the engineer officer in charge of the watch in the engine-room. 

It is ordered that all engine-room bell guide-plates, wherever situated, shall bear 
the folloAving directions in plain, readily distinguishable letters: 

1 bell, ahead slow. 

2 bells, stop. 

3 bells, back. 

4 bells, ahead fast. 

The repetition of a signal is to be understood as emphasizing its meaning. 

Example. — "One bell, ahead slow"; one bell, repeated, ahead slower. 

"Three bells, back"; three bells, repeated, back faster. 

The efficiency of a steam vessel-of-war depends largely upon prompt and intelligent 
manipulation of the machinery in obedience to signal, and it is therefore made the 
duty of every officer to familiarize himself with the instructions contained in this 
order. 

Inspecting, commanding, and engineer officers are required to see that all guide- 
plates are in strict conformity with the form above given, and such as are different 
will be removed as soon as practicable. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 13. 

March 29, 1880. 
When officers of the Navy are required to make oath in answering interrogatories 
sent them by the Examining Board in Washington, the expense attendisg the execu- 
tion thereof will be paid from "Contingent of the Navy," on the presentation of 
vouchers to any one of the purchasing paymasters of the Navy. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 14. 

March 29, 1880. 
In order to facilitate the execution of orders given by the Department, or any of 
its Bureaus, to the commandant of the navy yard at Norfolk, Virginia, to furnish 
vessels arriving in Hampton Roads with articles to be supplied from the yard, com- 
manding officers of vessels who are junior to the commandant will report to him 
their arrival in the Roads. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the 3,avy. 



Circular No. 15. 

May 12, 1880. 
Commanding officers of training-ships, when receiving apprentices from cruising 
vessels, will have them examined by the permanent board as to their professional 
qualifications. 



182 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

These apprentices may be advanced from time to time, in accordance with their 
proficiency, as high as seamen, upon the recommendation of the board, without regard 
to the complement of the ship, and to the rating of petty officers as vacancies may 
occur, if found in all respects qualified. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 16. 

May 12, 1880. 
Commanding officers of cruising vessels having apprentices on board, may, upon 
the recommendation of a board of officers, advance them to ordinary seamen of the 
2d class during the first year, to ordinary seaman during the second year, and to sea- 
men during the third year of their cruise, without regard to the complement of the 
ship : and when these apprentices have obtained the rating of seamen they may be 
advanced to the rating of petty officers as vacancies occur, if found qualified by a 
board. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

IT. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 22. 

May 26, 1880. 
Hereafter no officer whose name is borne on the books of a disbursing officer of the 
Navy, and who shall be detached and ordered to duty at another station or at sea, 
will be paid as on duty by such disbursing officer for any time beyond the date of his 
detachment. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

June 28, 1880. 
The Circular issued by the Department under date of July 2, 1878, in relation to 
the office of acting judge advocate, is hereby rescinded; and the following rules for 
the transaction of the business appertaining to the office of Judge Advocate General 
of the Navy, as established by the act of June 8, 1880, will hereafter be observed : 

1. All matters submitted to the Secretary of the Navy, involving questions of law 
or regulation, will be referred by him, or by the chief clerk of the Department acting 
under his order, to the Judge Advocate General for examination and report. 

2. The Chiefs of the several Bureaus and other offices connected with the Navy 
Department, and the clerks in the Secretary's office, will furnish the Judge Advocate 
General, upon his application, by reference of papers or otherwise, with all such facts 
and information from the books or records bearing upon any case or cases under con- 
sideration by him as he may require. 

3. The records of all general and summary courts-martial, courts of inquiry, and 
boards for the examination of officers for retirement and promotion, will be filed in 
the office of the Judge Advocate General. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 249. 

June 28, 1880. 
Hereafter, enlisted men of the Marine Corps, serving on board ship, will not be 
assigned to duty as master-at-arms, ship's corporal, ship's writer, school-master, 
yeoman, or apothecary, nor otherwise diverted from their appropriate duties, except 
in cases of emergency. When necessary to make such assignment, it will continue 
only until a suitable person can be selected, for the required duty, from the crew of 
one of the vessels on the station, or one enlisted for such rating. 
Marines will not be enlisted or discharged on foreign stations. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 250. 

June 28, 1880. 
The following act of Congress, approved June 8, 1880, establishing the office of 
Judge Advocate General of the Navy, is published for the information of the naval 
service : 

AN ACT to authorize the President to appoint an officer of the Navy or the Marine Corps to perform the 
duties of solicitor and judge-advocate-general, and so forth, and to fix the rank and pay of such officer. 

Be it enacted by tfie Senate and House of lieprcsentn/ircs of the I'uiirti ,^/n/i's of Amerigo in Congress assembled, 
That the President of the United States be, ami he is hereby, authorized to appoint, for the term of four years, 
by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, from the officers of the Navy or Marine Corps, a judge advo- 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 183 

cate general of the \a\.\. with the rank, pay, and allowances of a captain in the Navy or a colonel in the 
Marine Corps, as the case may be. And the office of the said judge advocate general shall be in the Navy 
Department, where he shall, under the direction <>!' the Secretary of the Navy, receive, revise, and have 
recorded the proceedings of all courts-martial, courts of inquiry, and boards I'm- the examination of officers for 
retirement aud promotion in the naval service, and perform such other duties as have heretofore been per- 
formed by the solicitor and naval judge advocate general. 

Ill accordance with the law above quoted, and with a view of defining more par- 
ticularly the duties and functions of the office of Judge Advocate General of the Navy, 
it is hereby ordered — 

First. The Judge Advocate General shall receive, revise, report upon, and have 
recorded, the proceedings of all courts-martial, courts of inquiry, and boards for the 
examination of officers for retirement and promotion in the naval service, and perform 
such other duties as have heretofore been performed by the solicitor and naval 
Judge Advocate General. 

Second. The proceedings of all general and summary courts-martial, courts of in- 
quiry, and boards for the examination of officers for promotion, after action thereon 
by the reviewing authority, will be forwarded direct to and filed in the office of the 
Judge Advocate'General. 

The presiding officers of general courts-martial, courts of inquiry, and boards for 
the examination of officers for retirement and promotion, convened by order of the 
Secretary of the Navy, will forward the proceedings of such courts and boards direct 
to the Judge Advocate General. 

Third. All communications pertaining to questions of law arising before courts- 
martial, courts of inquiry, and boards for the examination of officers for retirement 
and promotion, or to the proceedings thereof, which may require the action of the 
Department, will be addressed to the " Judge Advocate General of the Navy, Navy 
Department." 

K. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 23. 

June 30, 1880. 
Clauses II and IV of Paragraph 4, and Clauses II and III of Paragraph 5, Section 
I, Chapter III, of the U. S. Navy Regulations, approved August 7, 1876, are hereby 
annulled, and the following are substituted therefor : 

Paragraph 4. 

II. In case of the death, disability, or absence of an officer in military command or 
direction, this command and direction, with all its authority and precedence, de- 
volves and rests upon the line officer next in rank who may be present and on duty 
with such command. In processions on shore all officers take precedence according 
to their rank ; but when such procession forms a military command, the command 
devolves upon the senior officer present eligible to command, and authority and pre- 
cedence attach accordingly. On all courts-martial, courts of inquiry, boards of sur- 
vey , and other boards, line and staff officers take precedence according to rank. The 
senior officer of such courts or boards presides by virtue of his rank. 

IV. No officer of any grade of the Navy is authorized, by virtue of his own mere 
rank and authority, to give any order or grant any privilege, permission, or liberty 
to his senior in rank of any corps ; nor is any senior officer required to receive such 
order, privilege, permission, or liberty from his junior, unless such junior is at the 
time in command of the vessel-of-war or naval station to which the senior is attached, 
or in command or direction of the military expedition or duty on which such senior is 
serving, or is, as aid or executive, executing such order of the commanding officer ; 
and no commanding officer is authorized to delegate to any junior the authority to 
grant any permission, privilege, or liberty to his senior, but must himself receive and 
hear, under proper regulations, any request therefor from such senior, satisfying him- 
self as to its propriety, and deciding the matter in the exercise of his own authority. 
Any officer on shipboard, however, who is intrusted by general provision or special 
order of proper authority with any duty, the present performance of which may in- 
volve the movements of the ship itself, or the attitude of the ship's company as a 
whole, represents the commandant for that purpose, and is intrusted, for the time, 
with all the authority necessary for the proper performance of such duty ; and all 
officers, of whatever rank, are required to assist in carrying out such duty, and to 
receive and execute his orders for that purpose ; nor will he be interfered with therein, 
unless by the commandant, or the officer next in command, who is entitled to relieve 
him in the performance of such duty. All officers having occasion to address the 
officer of the deck on matters of duty, will first salute him by touching their caps r 
which salute he is required to return in like manner. 



184 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Paragraph 5. 

II. As the inspecting officer of the ship, required, at stated periods, to examine and 
report her general condition and efficiency in all her departments, the aid or execu- 
tive is entitled to make personal examination of and report upon all these, and, for 
that purpose, every facility is to be afforded him by every officer attached to the ves- 
sel ; and all officers in charge of store-rooms or other parts of the ship, for the neat 
and orderly appearance of which they are responsible, are required to have such 
store-rooms or parts of the ship in proper condition for his inspection at such times 
as may be designated by the commanding officer. 

III. As the officer to whom the details of the organization of the ship's company 
are intrusted, the aid or executive is the proper person to station the officers and 
crew, and to prepare, form, parade, and present them in proper attitude for review 
and inspection by the commanding or other proper officer ; and, for this purpose, he 
has authority to take preliminary charge of all formations and parades, to see that 
the whole is properly organized and paraded, and to receive the reports, customary 
on such occasions, from the officers in charge of departments and divisions, and. 
transmit them as a whole to the commanding officer. While carrying out the details 
of organization and those of police and inspection, in execution of the orders of the 
commanding officer, the aid or executive takes precedence over all officers attached to 
the ship, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly. Reports of heads of depart- 
ments and of officers senior in rank to the aid or executive, other than those above 
mentioned, will be made direct to the commanding officer. The commanding officer 
is authorized to grant temporary leave of absence to the officers and others attached 
to the vessel ; and under his orders and special directions such leave of absence may 
be granted by the aid or executive to officers who are junior to him in rank, but in no 
case shall he refuse such leave to a commissioned officer until the propriety of grant- 
ing such privilege has been considered and decided upon by the commanding officer 
Officers senior in rank to the aid or executive, desiring leave from the ship, will 
obtain the required permission directly from the commanding officer, and upon their 
return from leave will report the same to him through the officer of the deck. x\ll 
officers returning to the ship from leave will report their return to the officer of the 
deck, who will immediately report the same to the aid or executive. 

All circulars, orders, and regulations which conflict with Section I, Chapter III, of 
he Navy Regulations as modified by this Circular, are hereby abrogated to the extent 
in which they so conflict. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 251. 

June 30, 1880. 

From and after this date the rates of machinist and coppersmith in the Navy are 
abolished, but no machinist or coppersmith shall be discharged from the service in 
consequence of this order until the expiration of his enlistment, except upon his own 
application. 

The following rates are hereby established in the Navy as a part of the complement 
of the engineer force on every steam-vessel when commissioned for sea-service, or 
when employed on receiving-ship or training-ship duty, viz : "Finisher," ''Boiler- 
maker," and " Blacksmith," at an uniform pay of $50 per month and the usual ration. 

It is ordered that the engineer force of every steam vessel-of-Avar in commission 
shall contain two finishers, one boiler-maker, and one blacksmith. 

Applicants for the above rates, who are physically qualified, shall be examined by 
an experienced engineer officer attached to the vessel in which they are to serve 
(when practicable this officer shall be the chief engineer), and upon his recommenda- 
tion they shall be enlisted. 

The men filling these rates are not to be detailed for duty outside of the engine 
department. 

The uniform for the rates of finisher, boiler-maker, and blacksmith, and for the 
engineer's yeoman, shall be as follows : Single-breasted sack coats with a row of five 
medium-size navy buttons on the right breast, as prescribed for master-at-arms, apoth- 
ecaries, and pay master's yeomen. 

For muster these sack coats will be made of navy-blue cloth, and for working suits 
they will be made of navy-blue flannel. 

They will be allowed to wear white cotton or linen shirts and uniform vests, with 
six small-size navy buttons, and plain blue cloth caps, with visors. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circulars No. 6 and No. 18 are hereby revoked. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



185 



General Order, No. 252i 

July 7, 1880. 

Boats of the Navy, when fitted at navy yards, will be painted as follows: \ 

Launches, steam-cutters, and dinghies, black outside below the moldings, and lead- 
color inside. 

All other boats white outside below moldings, and white inside above footlings: 
below the footlings they will be lead-color. 

In all boats the outside moldings and gunwales will be kept bright. 

All smoke-stacks in vessels of the Navy will be kept black. 

WILLIAM N. JEFFEKS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



REGULATIONS FOR PREVENTING COLLISIONS AT SEA. 

General Order, No. 253. 

July 16, 1880. 

A revised code of "Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea" having been ap- 
proved by nearly all the maritime nations of the world, and adopted by them, to go 
into effect on the 1st September, 1880, thus becoming an integral part of the law of 
the sea, it is hereby adopted for the naval service of the United States, to go into 
effect on the above-mentioned date, in so far as the navigation of naval vessels outside of 
United States territorial waters is concerned. Within the waters of the United States 
naval vessels will be guided by the regulations for preventing collisions as specified 
in section 4233 of the United States Revised Statutes. 

Navy Department General Order No. 34, dated May 4, 1864, and forming Appendix 
No. 2 of the United States Naval Regulations, is hereby rescinded; and the precepts 
of the Revised Regulations and of the United States Statutes hereto appended will 
be strictly complied with in accordance with the above specifications. 

A careful examination and comparison of the appended codes is enjoined upon all 
officers of the Navy, especially of those parts of the Revised Regulations which are 
printed in italics, as it is in them that the modifications from the old rules exist. 

WILLIAM N. JEFFERS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



Section 4233, U. S. Revised Statutes. 

Rile I. Every steam-vessel which is under sail, and 
not under steam, shall he considered a sail-vessel : and 
every steam-vessel which is under steam, whether under 
sail or not, shall he considered a steam-vessel. 

Rule II. The lights mentioned in the following rules, 
and no others, shall be carried in all weathers, between 
sunset aud sunrise. 

Rule III. All ocean-going steamers, and steamers 
carrying sail, shall, when under way, carry — 

(A.) At the foremast-head, a bright white light, of 
such a character as to he visible on a dark night, with 
a clear atmosphere, at a distance of at least five miles, 
and so constructed as to show a uniform and unbroken 
light over an arc of the horizon of twenty points of the 
compass, and so fixed as to throw the light ten points 
on each side of the vessel, namely, from right ahead to 
two points abaft the beam on either side. 



(R.) On the starboard side, a green light, of such a 
character as to be visible on a dark night, with a clear 
atmosphere, at a distance of at least two miles, and so 
constructed as to show a uniform aud unbroken light 
over an arc of the horizon of ten points of the compass, 
and so fixed as to throw the light from right ahead to 
two points abaft the beam on the starboard side. 

(-C.) On the port side, a red light, of such a character 
as to be visible on a dark night, with a clear atmosphere, 
at a distance of at least two miles, aud so constructed 
as to show a uniform and unbroken light over an arc 
of the horizon of ten points of the compass, and so fixed 
as to throw the light from right ahead to two points 
abaft the beam on the port side. 

The green and red lights shall be fitted with inboard 
screens, projecting at least three feet forward from the 
lights, so as to prevent them from being seen across the 
bow. 



Revised International ReguUdiom. 

Akthi.k I. In the following rules every steamship 
which is under sail and not under steam is to be con- 
sidered a sailing-ship : and every steamship which is 
under steam, whether under sail or not, is to be con- 
sidered a ship under steam. 

Article II. The lights mentioned in the following 
articles, numbered 3, 4, 5, fj, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, and no 
others, shall he carried in all weathers from sunset to 
sunrise. 

Article III. A sea-going steamship, when under 
way. shall carry — 

('(.) On or in front of the fort-most, id a height above the 
hull of not less titan 20 feet, and if the breadth of the ship ex- 
ceeds 20 feet, then at a 'height above the hull not 'less than such 
breadth, a bright white light, so constructed as to show 
an uniform and unbroken light over an arc of the hori- 
zon of twenty points of the compass, so fixed as to throw 
the light ten points on each side of the ship, viz, from 
right ahead to two points abaft the beam on either side, 
and of such a character as to be visible on a dark night, 
with a clear atmosphere, at a distance of at least five 
miles. 

(b.) On the starboard side, a green light so constructed 
as to show an uniform and unbroken light over an arc 
of the horizon often points of the compass ; so fixed as 
to throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft 
the beam on the starboard side ; and of such a character 
as to be visible on a dark night, with a clear atmos- 
phere, at a distance of at least two miles. 

(c.) On the port side, a red light so constructed as to 
show an uniform and unbroken light over an arc of the 
horizon of ten points of the compass; so fixed as to 
throw the light from right ahead to two points abaft 
the beam on the port side ; and of such a character as 
to be visible on a dark night, with a clear atmosphere, 
at a distance of at least two miles. 

(d.) The said green and red side lights shall be fitted 
with inboard screens projecting at least three feet for- 
ward from the light, so as to prevent these lights from 
being seen across the bow. 



186 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



Rule IV. Steam-vessels, when towing other vessels, 
shall carry two bright white mast-head lights vertically, 
in addition to their side lights, so as to distinguish them 
from other steam-vessels. Each of these mast-head 
lights shall be of the same character and construction 
as the mast-head lights prescribed by Rule three. 



Rule V. All steam-vessels, other than ocean-going 
steamers and steamers carrying sail, shall, when under 
way, carry on the starboard and port sides lights of the 
same character and construction and in the same posi- 
tion as are prescribed for side lights by Rule three, ex- 
cept in the case provided in Rule six. 



(New Regulation.) 



Rui-e VI. River-steamers navigating waters flowing 
into the Gulf of Mexico, and their tributaries, shall 
carry the following lights, namely: One red light on 
the outboard side of the port smokepipe, and one green 
light on the outboard side of the starboard smokepipe. 
Such lights shall show both forward and abeam on their 
respective sides. 

Rule VII. All coasting steam-vessels, and steam- 
vessels other than ferry-boats and vessels otherwise 
expressly provided for, navigating the bays, lakes, riv- 
ers, or other inland waters of the United States, except 
those mentioned in Rule six, shall carry the red and 
green lights as prescribed for ocean-going steamers; 
and, in addition thereto, a central range of two white 
lights; the after light being carried at an elevation of 
at least fifteen feet above the light at the head of the 
vessel. The head-light shall be so constructed as to 
show a good light through twenty points of the com- 
pass, namely: from right ahead to two points abaft the 
beam on either side of the vessel; and the after light so 
as to show all around the horizon. The lights for 
ferry-boats shall be regulated by such rules as the 
board of supervising inspectors of steam-vessels shall 
prescribe. 

Rule VIII. Sail-vessels under way or being towed, 
shall carry the same lights as steam-vessels under way, 
with the exception of the white mast-head lights, 
which they shall never carry. 

Rule IX. Whenever, as in case of small vessels dur- 
ing bad weather, the green and red lights cannot be 
fixed, these lights shall be kept on deck, on their re- 
spective sides of the vessel, ready for instant exhibition, 
and shall, on the approach of or to other vessels, be 
exhibited on their respective sides in sufficient time to 
prevent collision, in such manner as to make them most 
visible, and so that the green light shall not be seen on 
theportside, nor the red light on the starboard side. To 
make the use of these portable lights more certain and 
easy, they shall each he painted outside with the color 
of the light they respectively contain, and shall be pro- 
vided with suitable screens. 

Rule X. All vessels, whether steam-vessels or sail- 
vessels, when at anchor in road-steads or fair-ways, 
shall, between sunset and sunrise, exhibit where it can 
best be seen, but at a height not exceeding twenty feet 
above the hull, a white light in a globular lantern of 
eight inches in diameter, and so constructed as toshow r 
a clear, uniform, and unbroken light, visible all around 
the horizon, and at a distance of at least one mile. 

Rule XI. Sailing pilot-vessels shall not carry the 
lights required tor other sailing vessels, but shall carry 
a white light at the mast-head, visible all around the 
horizon, and shall also exhibit a flare-up light every 
fifteen minutes. 

(New Regulation.) 



Article IV. A steamship, when towing another ship 
shall, in addition to her side lights, carry two bright 
white lights in a vertical line one over the other, not 
less (h,iu three feet apart, so as to distinguish her from 
other steamships. Each of these lights shall be of the 
same construction and character, and shall be carried 
in the same position as the white light which other 
steamships are required to carry. 



(Inland Water Regulation.) 



Article V. A ship, whether a steamship or sailing-ship, 
token employed either in laying or picking up a telegraph cable, 
or which, from any accident, is not under command, shall at 
night carry, in the same position as the white light which steam- 
ships are required to carry; and if a steamship, in place of 
that light, three red lights in globular lanterns, each not less ten 
inches in diameter, in a vertical line one over the other, not 
less than three feet apart; and, shall by day carry in a verti- 
cal line one over the other, not less than three feet apart, in 
front of but not lower than her foremast head, three black balls 
or sltapes, each two feet in diameter. 

These shapes and ligirts are to be taken by approaching 
ships as signals that the ship using them is not wider com- 
'iitand, and cannot therefore get out of the way. 

The above ships, when not making any way through the 
water, shall not carry the side lights, but when making way 
shall earn, them. 



(Inland Watt 

MIS.) 



Regulation not affecting naval ves- 



Articli, VI . A sailing ship under way, or being towed, 
shall carry the same lights as are provided by article 3 
for a steamship under way, with the exception of the 
white light, which she shall never carry. 

Article VII. Whenever, as in the case of small ves- 
sels during bad weather, the green and red side lights 
cannot he fixed, these lights shall be kept on deck, on 
their respective sides of the vessel, ready for use, and 
shall, on the approach of or to other vessels, be exhib- 
ited on their respective sides in sufficient time to pre- 
vent collision, in such manner as to make them most 
visible, and so that the green light shall not be seen on 
the port side nor the red light on the starboard side. 

To make the use of these portable lights more cer- 
tain and easy, the lanterns containing them shall each 
be painted outside with the color of the light they re- 
spectively contain, and shall be provided with proper 
screens. 

Article VIII. A ship, whether a steamship or a 
sailing ship, when at anchor, shall carry, where it can 
best be seen, but at a height not exceeding twenty feet 
above the hull, a white light in a globular lantern of 
not less than eight inches in diameter, and so con- 
structed as to show a clear, uniform, and unbroken 
light, visible all round the horizon at a distance of at 
least one mile. 

Article IX. A pilot-vessel, when engaged on her sta- 
tion on pilotage duly, shall not carry the lights required 
for other vessels, but shall carry a white light at the 
mast-head, visible all round the horizon, and shall 
also exhibit a flare-up light, or flare-up lights, at short 
intervals, which shall never exceed fifteen minutes. 

A pilot-vessel, when not engagedon her station on pilotage 

dllty, Shall carry lights similar /-< those of oilier ships. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



187 



Rvi.i. XII. Coal boats, trading boats, produce boats, 
canal boats, oyster boats, fishing boats, rafts, or other 
water craft, navigating any bay, harbor, or river, by 
hand-power, horse-power, sail, or by the current of the 
river, or which shall he anchored or moored in or near the 
channel or fair-way of any hay, harbor, or river, shall 
carry one or more good white lights, which shall be 
placed in such manner as shall he prescribed by the 

hoard of supervising inspectors of steam-vessels. 

RULE XIII. Open boats shall not he required to 
carry the side lights required tor other vessels, but shall, 
it' they do not carry such lights, cany a lantern having 
a green slide on one side and a red slide on the other 
side; and, on the approach of or to other vessels, such 
lantern shall he exhibited in sufficient time to prevent 
collision, and in such a manner that the gi'ecn light 
shall not be seen on the port side, nor the red light on 
the starboard side. Open boats, when at anchor or 
stationary, shall exhibit a bright white light. They 
shall not, however, be prevented from using a flare-up, 
in addition, if deemed expedient. 



(New Regulations.) 



Ki'i.K. XIV. The exhibition of any light on board of 
a vessel of war of the United States may be suspended 
whenever, in the opinion of the Secretary of the Navy, 
the commander in chief of a squadron, or the com- 
mander of a vessel acting singly, the special character 
of the service may require it. 

Rule XV. Whenever there is a fog, or thick weather, 
whether bv day or night, fog-signals shall be used, as 
follows: 



(.-1.) Steam-vessels under way shall sound a steam- 
whistle placed before the funnel, not less than eight 
feet from the deck, at intervals of not more than one 
minute. 

(B.) Sail-vessels under way shall sound a fog-horn at 
intervals of not more than rive minutes. 

(New Regulation.) 

(C.) Steam-vessels and sail-vessels, when not under 
way, shall sound a bell at intervals of not more than 
five minutes. 

(D.) Coal boats, trading boats, produce boats, canal 
boats, oyster boats, fishing boats, rafts, or other water 
craft, navigating any bay, harbor, or river, by hand- 
power, horse-power, sail, or by the current of the river, 
or anchored or moored in or near the channel or fair- 
way of any hay, harbor, or river, and not in any port, 
shall sound a fog-horn, or equivalent signal, which 
shall make a sound equal to a steam-whistle, at inter- 
vals of not more than two minutes. 



(inland Wat, 

sels.l 



Etegul 



»t affecting naval ves- 



AktioleX. («.) Open fishing boats and other open 
boats, when under way shall not he obliged to carry 
the side lights required for other vessels, but every 
such boat shall, in lieu thereof, have ready at hand a 
lantern with a green glass on the one side and a red 
glass on the other side, and on the approach of or to 
other vessels such lantern shall be exhibited, in suffi- 
cient time to prevent collision, so that the green light 
shall not he seen on the port side nor the red light on 
the starboard side. 

(b.) A fishing vessel and a n open boat, whenatanchor, 
shall exhibit a bright white light. 

(c.) A fishing vessel, when employed in drift-net fishing, 
shall carry on one of Iter masts tiro red light* in. a vertical line 
one over the other, not less than three feet apart. 

(d.) A trawler at work shall carry on one of her masts two 
lights in a vertical line one over the other, not less than three 
feet apart, the upper light red mid the hirer green, and shall 
also eitl/er carry the side lights required for other ressels, or, 
if the siile lights cannot be carried, hare read// at hand the 
colored lights, as provided in article 7, or a lantern with a 
red and a green glass, as described in paragraph (a) of this 
article. 

(e.) Fishing vessels and open boats shall not be pre- 
vented from using a flare-up in addition, if they desire 
to do so. 

( /'. ) The lights mentioned in this article are substituted for 
those mentioned in the 12th, 13th, and Uth articles of the 
convention between France and England scheduled to (fie 
British Sea Fisheries Act, 186S. 

(r/.) All lights required big this article, except side lights. 
shall be in globular lanterns so constructed as to show all 
round the horizon. 



(Rescinded.) 



Article XII. A steamship shall br provided with a steam- 
iPliistle ov other efficient steam-sound signal, so placed that 
the sound may not be intercepted big any obstructions, and 
with an efficient fog-horn to be sounded big a bellows o»- other 
mechanical means, and also with an efficient bell. A sailing- 
ship shall be provided with a similar fog-horn and belt. 

In fog, mist, or falling snow, whether by day or 
night, the signals described in this article shall he used 
as follows, that is to say: 

(«.) A steamship under way shall make with' her 
steam-whistle, or other steam-sound signal, at intervals 
'of not more than two minutes, a prolonged blast. 

(b.) A sailing ship under way shall make with her 
fog-horn, at intervals of not more than two minutes, 
when on the starboard tack one blast, when on the port tack 
two blasts in succession, and when with the wind abaft the 
beam three blasts in succession. 

(c) A steamship and sailing ship, when not under 
way, shall, at intervals of not more than two minutes, 
ring the bell. 



(Inland Watei 
sels.) 



Regulation not affecting naval ves- 



(See Rule XXI.) 



Rule XVI. If two sail-vessels 

or nearly end on, so as to involvi 
helms of both shall be put to pi 
pass on the port side of the othei 



ire meeting end on, 
risk of collision, the 
rt, so that each may 



Article XIII. Every ship, u- hetlier sailing ship or steam- 
ship, shall, in a fog, mist, or falling snow, go at a mod- 
erate speed. 



Note.— Paragraphs (<■), (d), (e), (/), and (g) of Article X are suspended until September 1, 1881, in order to, 
permit a knowledge of them to be circulated among all vessels which they affect. 



188 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



Rule XVII. When two sail-vessels are crossing so 
as to involve risk of collision, then, if they have the wind 
on different sides, the vessel with the wind on the port 
side shall keep out of the way of the vessel with the 
wind on the starboard side, except in the case in which 
the vessel with the wind on the port side is close-hauled, 
and the other vessel free, in which case the latter ves- 
sel shall keep out of the way. But if they have the 
wind on the same side, or if one of them has the wind 
aft, the vessel which is to windward shall keep out of 
the way of the vessel which is to leeward. 



Rule XVIII. If two vessels under steam are meeting 
end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of col- 
lision, the helms of both shall be put to port, so that 
each may pass on the port side of the other. 



(Explanatory note.) 



Rule XIX. If two vessels under steam are crossing 
so as to involve risk of collision, the vessel which has 
the other on her own starboard side shall keep out of 
the way of the other. 

Rule XX. If two vessels, one of which is a sail-ves- 
sel and the other a steam-vessel are proceeding in such 
directions as to involve risk of collision, the steam- 
vessel shall keep out of the way of the sail-vessel. 

Rule XXI. Every steam-vessel, when approaching 
another vessel, so as to involve risk of collision, shaifr 
slacken her speed, or, if necessary, stop and reverse; 
and every steam-vessel shall, when in a fog, go at a 
moderate speed. 

(Article XIX is an obligatory regulation in United 
States waters, although not mentioned in the .Statutes.) 



Rule XXII. Every vessel overtaking any other ves- 
sel shall keep out of the way of thelast-mentioned 



(New Regulation.) 



Rule XXI II. Where, by rules seventeen, nineteen, 
twenty, and twenty-two, one of two vessels shall keep 
out of the way, the other shall keep her course, subject 
to the qualifications of rule twenty-four. 

Rule XXIV. In construing and obeying these rules, 
due regard must be had to all dangers of navigation, 
and to any special circumstances which may exist in 
any particular case rendering a departure from them 
necessary in order to avoid immediate danger. 

Section 4234. * * * and every such vessel (sail- 
vessel) shall, on the approach of any steam-vessel during 
the night-time, show a lighted torch upon that point 
or quarter to which such steam-vessel shall lie ap- 
proaching. ;;: * * * * * * * * * * * * :]; 



Article XIV. When two sailing ships are approach- 
ing one another so as to involve risk of collision, ode 
of them shall keep out of the way of the other, as fol- 
lows, viz: 

(a.) A ship which is running free shall ke<-p out of 
the way of a ship which is close-hauled. 

(6.) A ship which is close-hauled on the port tack 
shall keep out of the way of a ship which is close-hauled 
on the starboard tack. 

(c.) When both are running free with the wind on 
different sides, the ship which has the wind on the port 
side shall keep out of the way of the other. 

(tl.) When both are running free with the wind on 
the same side, the ship which is to windward shall ket-p 
out the way of the ship which is to leeward. 

(<?.) A ship which has the wind aft shall keep out of 
the way of the other ship. 

Article XV. If two ships under steam are meeting 
end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of col- 
lision, each shall alter her course to starboard, so that 
each may pass on the port side of the other. 

This article only applies to cases inhere ships are meeting 
I'm! in,, or nearly end on. in such a manlier as to involve risk 
of collision, and does not apply to two ships which must, if 
loth keep on their respective courses, jmss clear ofeachoQu r. 

The only rases to which it does apply ore. ,rhr,i each of the 

two ships is end on, or nearly end on, t<> the oilier; mother 
words, to cases in which, by day, each ship sees the masts of 
the other in <i line r nearly in aline with her ovm; and, by 
night, to cases in which each ship is in such <> position as to 
see both the side lights of the other. 

It does not apply, by day, to vases in which a ship sees 
another ahead erossiiaj her own course, or, by night, to eases 
where the red light of one shit* is opposed 'to (fie red light 
of the other. <>r where the green UgM of one ship is opposed, 
to the green light of the other, or where a red light without a 
green lie/lit, or a green light without a red light, is sen, ah, ad, 
'or where both green and red lights are seen anywhere bat 
ahead. 

Article XYI. If two ships under steam are crossing 
so as to involve risk of collision, the ship which has the 
other on her own starboard side shall keep out of the 
way of the other. 

Article XVII. If two ships, one of which is a sail- 
ing ship and the other a steamship, are proceeding in 
such directions as to involve risk of collision, the steam- 
ship shall keep out of the way of the sailing ship. 

Article XVIII. Every steamship, when approaching 
another ship so as to involve risk of collision, shall 
slacken her speed or stop and reverse if necessary. 



Article XIX. In taking any course authorised or re- 
quired by these regulations, a steamship underway may indi- 
cate that course to ami otiu r ship which she has in' si,, hi h„ the 
following signals on 'her steam- whistle, vis: 

One short blast to mean "I am directing my course to 
starboard.' 1 '' Tiro short blasts to mean "Iain dir<_<-ti„>j my 
course to port." Three short biasts to mean "I am going 
full speed astern.' 1 '' 

The use of these signals is optional; bid if then are used 
the course of the ship must be in accordance wiffi fliesignal 
made. 

Article XX. Notwithstanding anything contained in any 
preceding article, every ship, whether a sailing ship or a 
steamship, overtaking another, shall keep out of the 
way of the overtaken ship. 

Article XXI. In narrow channels every steamship shall, 
when it is safe and practicable, keep to that side of Ote fair- 
way or mid-channel which lies on the starboard side of such 
shijJ. 

Article XXII. Where, by the above rules, one of 
two ships is to keep out of the way, the other shall keep 
her course. 

Article XXIII. In obeying and construing these 
rules, due regard shall be had to all dangers of navi- 
gation, and to any special circumstances which may 
render a departure from the above rules necessary in 
order to avoid immediate danger. 

Article XL A ship which is being overtaken by 
another shall show from her stern to such last-men- 
tioned ship a white light or a flare-up light. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 189 

Aeticlk XXIV. Nothing in these rules shall exonerate 
11,111 skip, •>>■ the owner, <>r master, or crew thereof, from the 
consequences of any neglect to carry lights or signals, <>r of 
any neglect to keep a 'proper lookout, or of the neglect of any 
precaution which may be required by the ordinary pracHceof 
seamen, or by the special circumstances of the <■</*,■. 

Aktici.k XXV. Nothing in these rules shall interfere with 
I N.'w Regulations.) Ute operation of a special rule, duly made by local authority, 

relative to the navigation of any harbor, river, or inland navi- 
gation. 

AlRTICLE XXVT. Nothing in these rules shall interfere 
with the operation of any special rules made by the govern- 
ment of any notion with respect to additional station <nnl sig- 
nal lights for two or more ships of war, or for ships sailing 
under convoy. 

General Order, No. 254. 

September 2, 1880. 

Coast pilots will not be employed on any vessel of the Navy unless authorized by 
the Bureau of Navigation : and when coast pilots are allowed, they shall not be paid 
for local pilotage. 

When any vessel of the Navy shall require a local pilot in the waters of any State, 
a pilot licensed under the laws of the United States, or one licensed under the State 
laws, shall be employed. But vessels of the Navy may enter and depart from ports 
within the waters of any State without United States or State pilots, at the discre- 
tion of the commanding officers thereof. In all cases, pilotage of any such vessels 
will be regulated in accordance with the existing laws of the States, respectively, 
wherein local pilots may be employed. 

The circular issued by the Department May 14, 1874, in relation to the employment 
of pilots, is herebv rescinded. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 255. 

December 2, 1880. 

Referring to General Order No. 251, of June 30, 1880, the second, fourth, and fifth 
paragraphs are modified so as to read as follows : 

" The following rates, as substitutes for machinists and copper-smiths, are hereby 
established in the Navy as a part of the complement of the engineer force on all 
steam vessels-of-war when commissioned for sea-service, or when employed as cruis- 
ing training-ships, viz : ' Finisher,' ' Boiler-maker,' and ' Blacksmith,' at an uniform 
pay of fifty dollars per month and the usual ration." 

" Applicants for the above rates, who are physically qualified, shall be examined 
by an experienced engineer officer as to skill in their respective trades (when prac- 
ticable this officer shall be a Chief Engineer), and upon his recommendation they 
shall be enlisted." 

'• The men filling these rates are not to be detailed for duty outside of theWigine 
department except in case of great emergency." 

The two U. S. Navy Regulation Circulars, Nos. 6 and 18, revoked in General Order 
No. 251, are of the dates of October 4, 1873, and March 20, 1875. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 256. 

December 3, 1880. 
The provisions of General Order No. 251, dated June 30, 1880, abolishing the rate 
of machinist in the Navy, and of General Order No. 255, dated December 2, 1880, 
explanatory thereof, shall not apply to machinists employed on board vessels of the 
Coast Survey and Fish Commission : and men will be enlisted in that rating as here- 
tofore for such special service. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 
Secretary of the Navy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 24. 

Relative to examination of Acting Gunners for entrance, and subsequently for a warrant, as 

Gunner. 

December 9, 1880. 
Paragraphs 5 and 6, page 92, Regulations for the Navy, 1876, are hereby altered 
and amended to read as follows: 

The act of Congress, approved May 12, 1879, provides — 

"That in the appointment of warrant officers in the naval service of the United States, preference shall he 
given to men who have been honorably discharged upon the expiration of an enlistment as an apprentice or 
boy, to serve during minority, and re-enlisted within three months after such discharge, to serve during a 
term of three or more years." 



190 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

A candidate for the appointment of acting gunner must be a seaman of sober and 
correct habits ; not more than thirty years of age, and must, previous to the profes- 
sional examination, pass the required physical examination. 

Hereafter, no person shall be appointed an acting gunner until he shall have satis- 
factorily passed an examination on the subjects herein mentioned, at the Washington 
Navy Yard, before a duly authorized board of line officers; and no acting gunner 
shall receive a warrant as gunner unless he shall present commendatory letters from 
his commanding officers, after making a cruise of not less than one year, as acting 
gunner, in a sea-going vessel-of-war, and shall pass a thorough examination in all 
the duties of a gunner. 

He must be able to read and write Avith facility ; must understand the first four 
rules of arithmetic and proportion; must be able to keep the gunner's accounts cor- 
rectly. 

He" must understand the construction and mode of dismounting and assembling, 
and the difficulties to be remedied in B. L. rifles, B. L. howitzers, all revolving 
cannon and machine-guns of service types, and the magazine rifles and other small- 
arms in the naval service ; also the use of such tools as are supplied for repairing 
ordnance at sea. 

He must be able to put up all kinds of ammunition, to take impressions of vent and 
bore, to star-gauge guns, to adjust, verify, and use sights, and to fit all gun gear ; 
and thoroughly understand and be able to explain all fuzes in use in the Navy. 

He must understand the manner of fitting magazines, shell-rooms, shell-houses, and 
light-rooms; the manner of stowing and preserving powder, projectiles, fireworks, 
and all ordnance stores, afloat and ashore : the manner of handling and securing 
guns. 

He must be fully conversant with all orders and regulations in regard to the care 
and handling of ordnance material and stores afloat and ashore, and with the charges 
of powder for guns and projectiles of every calibre. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Xary. 

Circular No. 17. 

December 13, 1880. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 1, issued March 15, 1877, is so amended as to 
include the Judge Advocate General of the Navy as a member of the Board referred 
to therein. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 257. 

December 16, 1880. 

Ordered, that the vessels employed in training apprentices for the Navy shall, from 
and after this date, constitute a training fleet, and be placed under the command of 
an officer who shall be of a rank not below that of captain, who shall also be in com- 
mand of the permanent headquarters or " Naval Training Station." 

Ordered, that the " Coasters' Harbor Island," in Narragansett Bay, near Newport, 
Rhode Island, be, and the same hereby is, established as the "Naval Training Sta- 
tion " for apprentices, which place shall be the headquarters of said " training fleet." 

Ordered, that all business and correspondence of said "Fleet and Station" shall be 
conducted as heretofore, through the same channels, under the jurisdiction of the 
Navy Department. 

Ordered, that the tender of the real estate made by the State of Rhode Island for 
the uses of said "training fleet" be, and it hereby is, accepted, and when hereafter 
the same shall be conveyed to the United States by authority of law, then the station 
hereby established shall be permanent — until then it shall be considered as only 
temporary. 

R. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

December 29, 1880. 

The officers of the Navy and Marine Corps will assemble at the Navy Department 
at 11.30 o'clock a. m., on Saturday, January 1, 1881, in full-dress uniform for occa- 
sions of special ceremony, to pay their respects to the President of the United States 
at 12 o'clock. 

They will form in the Navy Department, under the direction of the senior officer 
present, and, in a body, wait upon the President of the United States. 

ALEXANDER RAMSAY, 

Acting Seci'etary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 191 

General Order, No. 258. 

January 13, 1881. 

Hereafter all pay officers of the Navy, except when at sea or attached to foreign 
stations, on being relieved from duty involving pecuniary responsibility, will imme- 
diately deposit in the Treasury of the United States, or other designated depository, 
the total balance of public funds in their hands, and forward duplicate of the cer- 
tificate of deposit to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury without delay. 

Under no circumstances will they transfer such balance, or any part of it, to their 
successors, or carry it to future accounts of their own, unless specially authorized to 
do so by the Department. 

N. GOFF, Jr., 

,. Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 259. 

January 25, 1881. 
The following opinion of the Attorney General of the United States is published 
for the information of the Navy. 

N. GOFF, Jr., 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Department of Justice, 

Washington, November 15, 1880. 

Sir : The letter of the Acting Secretary of the Navy of the 29th ult. informs me that one William Brown, a 
coal-heaver in the Navy, committed an assault upon one John Kennedy, a second-class fireman in the Navy, 
on board the U. S. S. "Minnesota," in the Thames river, opposite the city of New London, Connecticut, on 
the 10th day of May last, when that vessel was under weigh, en route to New York ; and that the injuries 
inflicted by Brown upon Kennedy in this assault were so severe as to require the removal of the latter to the 
Naval Hospital, New York, for treatment, the day following the assault, where he died of fractura and result- 
ing pneumonia, as represented by the ccrificate of death, a copy of which the Acting Secretary incloses. 

The matter was brought to the notice of the city attorney, New London, with a view to the trial of Brown 
by the civil authorities of Connecticut, who replied, "It is considered best that Brown should be dealt with 
by the authorities of the United States." 

As this offence was committed by a person engaged in the service upon another person also engaged in the 
service, on board a vessel of the Navy, and affects directly the discipline of the service, the letter inquires 
whether said offence may be taken cognizance of by a general court-martial, under Article 22, section 1624 of 
the Revised Statutes, as manslaughter, in violation of that article. 

The article from which the present article is derived is first found in the act "for the government of the 
Navy of the United States," approved March 2, 1799 (1 Stat., 709), and is in the following form : 

"AttT. 46. All faults, disorders, and misdemeanors which shall be committed on board any ship belonging 
to the United States, and which are not herein mentioned, shall be punished according to the laws and customs 
in such cases at sea." 

The next statement is in the act of April 23, 1800 (2 Stat., 45) : 

"Art. XXXII. All crimes committed by persons belonging to the Navy, which are not specified in the fore" 
going articles, shall be punished according to the laws and customs in such cases at sea." 

Article 8 of the act of .Inly 17, 1862 (12 Stat., 600), is as follows : ■ 

"All offences committed by persons belonging to the Navy, which are not specified in the foregoing articles, 
shall be punished as a court-martial shall direct; but in no case shall punishment by flogging be inflicted nor 
shall any court-martial adjudge punishment by flogging." 

The present form of Article 22, section 1624, Revised Statutes, is the same as that of the last-mentioned 
article, except that it omits the last clause in regard to flogging ; that subject being elsewhere dealt with. 

The use of the words "all faults, disorders, and misdemeanors" in the first form would seem to limit it to 
offences of a minor grade, such as would be accurately expressed by those three words. 

The use of the words "all crimes," etc., in the second form would extend it beyond mere minor offences, 
and the change of the word "crimes" into the more general word "offences" (which is the word found in the 
existing article) would indicate that a general word was used for the purpose of including all that might be 
embraced by the terms "faults," "disorders," "misdemeanors," or "crimes." This article cannot be inter- 
preted as intending to give to a court-martial general criminal jurisdiction, but only jurisdiction over those 
offences not specified by name, which are injurious to the order and discipline of the Navy ; and this juris- 
diction is given for the purpose of preserving that order and discipline. 

Even, therefore, if the authorities of Connecticut had seen fit to try this man for manslaughter, which they 
might probably have done, it would not have ousted the court-martial of jurisdiction over the same offencel 
so far as it affected the order and discipline of the ship. The offence in the one case, punished by the civi, 
authorities, would be the offence against the public peace ; in the other, it would be the offence against the' 
order and discipline of the Navy. 

It requires no argument to show that an assault of a character so serious as to result in the death of the 
person assaulted, who was also in the naval service, is an offence against the order and discipline of the Navy 
especially when among the enumerated cases is found the offence of "assault and battery." 

I am, therefore, of opinion that the court-martial may properly take cognizance of this offence under the 
article in question, and that it may inflict such punishment as is proper for an offence so prejudicial to the 
order and discipline of a ship-of-war. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. DEYENS, 

Attorney General. 
Hon-. R. W. Thompson, 

Secretary of the Nary. 



192 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 260. 

February 2, 1881. 
The additional sum of one dollar and fifty cents per month, which was allowed 
the enlisted men in the Navy, from the 1st of July, 1870, by order of the President 
of the United States, is included in the rate of pay fixed by General Order No. 251, 
dated June 30, 1880, for the ratings of finisher, boilermaker, and blacksmith of the 
engineer force. 

N. GOFF, Jr., 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 261. 

February 7, 1881. 
The following extracts from an act of Congress are published for the information 
and government of all concerned. 

N. GOFF, Jr., 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

[Private— No. 11.] 

AX ACT authorizing the persons therein named to accept of certain decorations and presents therein named 
from foreign governments, and for other purposes. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Bejyresentatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, * * * * 

That Lieutenant Benjamin H. Buckingham, of the United States Navy, be. and he 
is hereby, authorized to accept from the President of the French Republic the Cross 
of the Legion of Honor,' in appreciation of services in connection with the Exposi- 
tion of eighteen hundred and seventy-eight at Paris ; 

That Bear-Admiral John J. Almy, United States Navy, be, and he is hereby, 
authorized to accept a decoration of the order of Kemehameha the First, which has 
been tendered to him by the King of the Hawaiian Islands as an evidence of his 
appreciation of that officer; 

That Lieutenant Z. L. Tanner, of the United States Navy, late commanding the 
Pacific mail steamer City of Pekin, be, and he is hereby, authorized to accept from 
the Japanese government a pair of flower-vases and a lacquered box, in acknowledg- 
ment of his services in rescuing four Japanese seamen from a wreck on the Pacific 
Ocean on the nineteenth of January, eighteen hundred and seventy-seven ; 

That Commodore J. W. A. Nicholson, United States Navy, be, and he is hereby, 
authorized to accept from the Spanish Government the Grand Cross of Naval Merit, 
with a white badge, as a mark of appreciation of the ser%ices rendered to the officers 
and crew of the wrecked war-ship Pizarro. 

Sec. 2. That no decoration, or other thing, the acceptance of which is authorized 
by this act, and no decoration heretofore accepted, or which may hereafter be 
accepted, by consent of Congress, by any officer of the United States, from any for- 
eign government, shall be publicly shown or exposed upon the person of the officer 
so receiving the same. 

Sec. 3. That hereafter any present, decoration, or other thing, which shall be 
conferred or presented by any foreign government to any officer of the United States, 
civil, naval, or military, shall be tendered through the Department of State, and 
not to the individual in person, but such present, decoration, or other thing, shall 
not be delivered by the Department of State unless so authorized by act of Congress. 

Approved, January 31, 1881. 



General Order, No. 262. 

February 7, 1881. 
The following opinion of the Attorney General of the United States is published 
for the information of the Navv- 

N. GOFF, Jr., 

Secretary of the Navy. 

f Department of Justice, 

Washington, December 10, 1880. 

Sir : Your letter of the 29th ult. informs me that Lieutenant , U. S. N., was suspended from 

promotion February 6, 1880, under the provisions of section 1505, Revised Statutes, having been found pro- 
fessionally disqualified. Lieutenant Commander , U. S. N., was promoted to the grade of com- 
mander, to fill a vacancy, January 22, 1880, at which time Lieutenant , the senior officer of his 

grade, became entitled to examination for promotion to fill a vacancy in the next higher grade, caused by the 
promotion of Lieutenant Commander 1 — . In obedience to an order dated January 22, 1880, Lieu- 
tenant appeared on the 27th of that month before the examining boards for the examinations pre- 
liminary to promotion, required by sections 14£3 and 1496, Revised Statutes. The Board of Medical Examiners 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 193 

having pronounced Lieutenant physically qualified to perform all his duties ;tt sea, he was then 

examined by the Examining Board as to liis mental, moral, and professional fitness for promotion, which board 

reported its finding as follows : "We hereby certify that Lieutenant has the ntal and moral 

qualifications to perform efficiently all the duties, both at sea and on shore, of the next higher grade, but he 
lias not the professional qualifications required, and we do not therefore recommend him for promotion."' The 
proceedings and findings of the Examining Board in this case were presented to the President for his action, 
who endorsed his orders thereon as follow.-: 

"Executive Mansion, 

"February 6, 1880. 
" The findings and recommendations of the hoards in this case are approved, and, in conformity with section 

1505 of the Revised Statutes. Lieutenant , (J. S. Navy, will be suspended from promotion for one 

year, with corresponding loss of date. 

"R. B. HAYES. 

Lieutenant was then informed hy letter from the Navy Department of February 9, 1880, of the 

findings of the board and the President's action thereon. 

Lieutenant . U. S. N., who was next in rank to Lieutenant , was then exam- 
ined, found qualified, and promoted, February 9, 1880, to the grade of lieutenant commander, with rank as 

such from January 22, 1880, to fill the vacancy caused by the promotion of Lieutenant Commander . 

Six vacancies have occurred in the grade of lieutenant commander since the promotion of Mr. 

four of which have been filled by promotion of lieutenants, according to seniority. Orders have been issued for 
the examination of the seuior lieutenant, who, if. found qualified, will be promoted to fill one of the two exist- 
ing vacancies in the grade of lieutenant commander. 

In view of the fact that the period of suspension from promotion of Lieutenant will soon expire, 

and he will be re-examined, and that the number of officers in the grade of lieutenant commander is limited by 
law (section 1363, Revised Statutes), you request my opinion upon the following questions : 

1. Should a vacancy in the grade of lieutenant commander be held open for the promotion of Lieutenant 
, if found qualified upon re-examination? 

2. Does the loss of date by Lieutenant commence from January 22, 1880, the date from which 

he would have taken rank as lieutenant commander had he been found qualified for promotion, or from Feb- 
ruary G, 1880, the date of the approval of the findings of the Examining Board in his case by the President? 

In the event of an answer to your first question in the negative, yoti inquire — 

3. Could Lieutenant be promoted to the next higher grade, if found qualified upon re-examina- 
tion, at the expiration of his period of suspension, or should his promotion be then postponed until the hap- 
pening of a vacancy in the grade of lieutenant commander? 

Section 1505, Revised Statutes, is as follows : 

" Any officer of the Navy on the active list below the grade of commander, who, upon examination for pro- 
motion, is not found professionally qualified, shall be suspended from promotion for one year, with corre- 
sponding loss of date, when he shall be re-examined, and in case of his failure upon such re-examination, he 
shall be dropped from the service.' M 

Before proceeding to answer your inquiries, it seems to me important to consider whether the provisions in 
section 1505 for suspension from promotion and for loss of date contemplate that the term of the one is to be con- 
temgtoraneous with the period of the other. The difficulties presented by this question may be thus briefly stated : 

If it be held that the loss of date of Lieutenant is to commence from the time when the President 

approved the findings of the Examining Board, he may practically lose much more than a year in date, as, 
under some circumstances, there may be considerable delay in the adjudication of his case. But little delay 
occurred in the present case, yet enough obviously to make it an important question. On the other hand, if 

the suspension of Lieutenant is to date from the time of the occurrence of the original vacancy — 

namely, January 22. 1880 — it is easy to conceive of cases in which the officer suspended would not have the 
time which it was the intention of the statute to allow him, in order to repair the deficiencies in his profes- 
sional qualifications. If, upon the second examination, he fails, the officer is to be dropped from the roll of 
the Navy: and in making provision for suspension and for re-examination it was clearly intended that a con- 
siderable time should elapse between the commencement of the date of the suspension and the time when he 
could be ordered for re-examination. 

In view of these considerations, I am of opinion that the words in the statute "shall be suspended from pro- 
motion for one year, witli corresponding loss of date," etc., do not mean that the loss of date shall necessarily 
be contemporaneous with the period of suspension, but that the loss of date shall correspond in length of time 
with the period of suspension. In this view, it seems to me, justice will be done to the officer, and to the evi- 
dent intention of the statute, that he shall be retained in the service when his deficiency has been one that may 
be reasonably expected to he soon repaired. The year of loss of date by Lieutenant will com- 
mence from January 22, 1880, but the period during which he will he suspended from promotion will commence 
on February u, 1880. He will thus be only punished with a loss of date of one year in extent. The period of 
suspension will extend over an equal time, during which he will have an opportunity to repair the deficiencies 
that have been found to exist. 

It is necessary, in this connection, to consider what will he the operation of this construction in regard to 

future events. For the period of the year of suspension Lieutenant is out of the service so far as 

promotion is concerned. He cannot be promoted until February C, 1881. When promoted, the date from 
which (assuming that he shall then have passed his examination) he is to take rank will be correctly stated by 
causing his rank to commence as of the date of January 22, 1881. As he is ineligible for promotion during the 
whole year commencing February 6, 1880, no vacancies should be kept open for him until that time arrives. 
Such vacancies as occur, the officers who are then eligible are entitled to fill, and it is the obvious intention of 
Congress that such positions shall be filled, as they are created not for the benefit of officers but for the needs 
of the public service. As his loss of date is only to be from January 22, 1880, when he is able thereafter to 
obtain promotion, his rank should be exjiressed as above stated in his commission. Undoubtedly, it is true 

that vacancies may not occur until many months after February G, 1881 ; but of this Lieutenaut — — 

would have no just ground of complaint. The only period of suspension that the law has designated is termi- 
nated on February G, 1881. If he is unable to be promoted at that time, or immediately thereafter, it is only 
the common ca.-e of an officer eligible for promotion, but for whom no vacancy is ready. It would be impos- 
sible, for his benefit, to extend the number of lieutenant commanders beyond that designated by the statute. 
In stating- that he would be entitled to have rank, when he shall finally have been promoted, as of the date of 
January 22, 1881, I do not intend to be understood as intimating that he would be entitled to the pav of the 
higher grade from the ranking date in his commission. His case would not be that of the officer provided for 
by section 1WJ2, Revised Statutes. 

To answer your questions, then, directly, I reply to your first and third inquiries that no vacancy in the 

grade of lieutenant commander should he held open for the promotion of Lieutenant which may 

occur previous to the expiration of the year of his suspension, and that he cannot be promoted into the next 
higher grade, if found qualified upon re-examination, at the expiration of his period of suspension, until a 
vacancy shall have occurred in that grade. His promotion is necessarily postponed until the occurrence of a 
vacancy in that grade by the law which limits the number of lieutenant commanders. 

13 



194 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

In answer to your second inquiry, 1 reply that the loss of date by Lieutenant commences from 

January 22, 1880, the date from which he would have taken rank as lieutenant commander ; and, as before 
stated, that the period of his suspension commences on the date of the approval of the findings of the Exam- 
ining Board by the President. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. DEVENS, 
Hon. E. W. Thompson, Attorney General. 

Secretary of the Navy. 






General Order, No. 263. 

February 24, 1881. 
The President of the United States has this day, under the provisions of section 
1478 of the Revised Statutes, conferred relative rank on civil engineers of the Navy, 
and fixed the same as follows : 

One with the relative rank of captain ; 
Two with the relative rank of commander ; 
Three with the relative rank of lieutenant commander; 
Four with the relative rank of lieutenant. 
Civil engineers will take precedence in their corps, and with other officers with 
whom they hold relative rank, in accordance with the law regulating precedence of 
officers of the Navy. 

N. GOFF, Jr., 



Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 25. 

February 25, 1881. 
Hereafter the Quarterly Return of the number of the crew, &c, prescribed in Form 
No. 20, pages 228 and 229 of the Navy Regulations, shall be prepared and signed by 
the executive instead of the pay officer of the vessel, and approved by the command- 
ing officer. 

N. GOFF, Jr., 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 264. 

March 2, 1881. 
The following opinion of the Attorney General of the United States is published 
for the information of the Navy. 

N. GOFF, Jr., 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Department of Justice, 

Washington, February 25," 1881. 

Sir: Your letter of the 12th ult. submits to me a question which has arisen as to the application of the con- 
cluding clause of section 1486, Revised Statutes, to certain officers of the line in the Navy, who were promoted 
by selection under the provisions of the "Act to define the number and regulate the appointment of officers in 
the Navy, and for other purposes." approved July 25, 1866. (14 Stat., 222.) 

The first section of this act enlarged the number of line officers in the higher grades of the Navy, created 
original vacancies in each grade above that of lieutenant, and provided that appointments to fill such vacancies 
be made as follows : "That the increase in the grades authorized by this act shall be made by selection from 
the grade next below of officers who have rendered the most efficient and faithful service dutfng the recent 
war, and who possess the highest professional qualifications and attainments. " 

The vacancies thus created were, accordingly, filled by the selection and advancement of officers, without 
regard to seniority, from the grade below the one to which they were promoted. 

As an illustration of the operation of the first section of this act, your letter cites the cases of two officers 
whose relative positions on the Navy list were affected by the promotions made by selection, in conforming 
with its provisions, viz: Richard L. Law, who entered the service February 17, 1841, stood, at the date of said 
promotions, No. 7 on the list of lieutenant commanders, was not among those selected and promoted under the 
act. Francis M. Ramsay, who entered the service October 5, 1850, stood, at the date of said promotions, and 
when selected for advancement under the act referred to, No. 77 on the list of lieutenant commanders; and, 
when said promotions were completed, he stood No. 00 on the list of commanders, while Lieutenant Commander 
Law stood No. 2 in his original grade (lieutenant commander). Since that time, by promotion in due course, 
these two officers have attained the rank of captain. Captain Ramsay being the senior by date of commission. 

Tour letter requests my opinion upon the question whether, in estimating the length of service of Captains 
Ramsay and Law, for the purpose of determining their precedence with officers of the staff corps holding the 
relative rank of captain (under the provisions of sections 1485-86, Revised Statutes), the former should be con- 
sidered as having been advanced in numbers on the Navy Register, and gained length of service accordingly, 
or the latter be considered as having lost numbers and length of service accordingly. 

The object of the act of 1866 was, by an increase of rank in connection with an increase of numbers in 
certain grades in the Navy, to compensate officers who had rendered special meritorious service. ^This was not 
to be done by inflicting any injury upon officers who had been less fortunate perhaps in their opportunities, but 
by conferring promotion upon certain officers, which would incidentally in almost all case.- operate also to benefit 
officers not actually advanced. Thus, in the case stated in your letter, while Lieutenant Commander Law was 
not nominally advanced, lie was actually advanced by the promotions made, so that, instead of standing 7th on 
the list of lieutenant commanders, he stood 2d on that list when they were completed. When officers were 
advanced in numbers it was necessary, in determining their relative rank with other grades of the Navy, that 
they should also be treated as having constructively' gained length of service to a sufficient extent to place them 
above the officers over whom they were thus advanced. But in no case did the officer over whom they were 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 195 

thus advanced lose anything in the length of service which he had actually rendered. The proceeding itself 
was one of advancement strictly, and in no case operated to degrade any officer or deprive him of anything 
which he had already obtained by length of service. Canes mighl be supposed in which it might do him 
incidental injury i>\ placing above him an officer who stood below him; but his own position with reference to 
all grades of the Navy would be that which it originally was. When, therefore, by section 148t;, Revised 
Statutes (act of March 3, 1871, C. 117. s. 10, 16 Stat., 537), provision was made for regulating the relative rank 
of the staff corps and line, no officer in the line would he found to have lost anything of his actual length of 
service. A constructive length of service was necessary to he attributed to the officers who had been advanced 
to a higher number above him in the same grade, or to a higher grade. It is true the expression of the last 
clause of section 1486 is that "officers who have been advanced or lost numbers on the Navy Register shall he 
considered as having gained or lost length of service accordingly.' 1 Whether this phrase is intended to use 
the words ••gained" ami "lost" as terms which are the converse of each other, and refers to such incidental 
loss as occurs by change in relative position between two officers, or whether the expression "lost length of 
service" is to lie considered as referring to those officers who may have heen degrad"d (as by sentence of court- 
martial), it is not necessary now to determine. It seems to me quite clear that this clause cannot receive a 
meaning in connection with the facts stated by you that would in any way operate as a degradation of the officer 
over whom another had been promoted, or to deprive him of a right already acquired by honorable length of 
service. 

In estimating, therefore, length of service for the purpose of determining their precedence with officers of 
the staff corps. I would say, in direct answer to your inquiry, that the officer promoted will be considered as 
having gained length of service according to his promotion, hut that the other officer will not be considered as 
having lost anything in length of service, the effect of the promotion upon the latter officer being purely an 
incidental one. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. DEVENS, 
i Attorney General. 

Hon. Nathan Goff, Jr., 

Secretary of the Nary. 



Circular relating to the Enlistment of Boys in the U. S. Xaval Service. 

March 15, 1881. 

The Circular of May 31, 1879, relating to the enlistment of boys in the U. S. naval 
service, is hereby rescinded, and the following substituted, in accordance with the 
amendments to the Revised Statutes of the United States, approved February 23, 
1881, to wit : 

" Section 1418. Boys between the ages of fourteen and eighteen years maybe 
enlisted to serve in the Navy until they shall arrive at the age of twenty-one years, 
&c, &c." 

" Section 1419. Minors between the ages of fourteen and eighteen years shall not 
be enlisted for the naval service without the consent of their parents or guardians." 

"Section 1420. No minor under the age of fourteen years, no insane or. intoxicated 
person, and no deserter from the naval or military service of the United States shall 
be enlisted in the naval service/' 

These boys will be sent on board of suitable vessels, to be trained for the naval 
service, under the following regulations : 

Each boy previous to being enlisted must satisfy the Examining Board of Officers — 

That he is of robust frame, intelligent, of perfectly sound and healthy constitu- 
tion, free from any physical defects or malformation, and not subject to fits. 

That he is able to read and write. 

In special cases where the boy shows a general intelligence, and is otherwise quali- 
fied, he majtbe enlisted, notwithstanding his reading and writing are imperfect. 

That his height and measure are sufficient, being as follows: 



Age. 


Height. 


Weight. 


Chest measurement — 
breathing naturally. 








26 inches. 




4 feet 11 inches 












Seventeen to eighteen 


5 feet 2 inches 


100 pounds 


29 inches. 



Each boy upon presenting himself for enlistment must be accompanied by his 
father, or by his mother in case the father be deceased, or by his legally appointed 
guardian in case he has no father nor mother, their signature being required on the 
Shipping Articles to perfect the enlistment. 

The parent or guardian, however, who by reason of distance, infirmity, or other 
causes, cannot accompany the son or ward to the place of enlistment, will be fur- 
nished, on written application to the commanding officer of either of the vessels upon 
which enlistments are made, with duplicates of a printed form of declaration, oath, 
&c, by which the enlistment will be perfected, should the boy be accepted by the 
Board of Examining Officers. 

No allowance can be made for traveling expenses, whether accepted or not. 



196 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

The Board of Examining Officers will consist of the captain, a line officer, and the 
senior medical officer of the vessel. 

If the examining officers are of the opinion that the boy is in every respect fit for 
the service, the engagement to serve continuously in the service until twenty-one 
years of age is to be read and explained to him, and if he voluntarily agrees to its 
terms, he is then, in the presence of a witness, to sign the agreement and be enlisted. 

The examining officers will fill up the form and certificate attached to the engage- 
ment, and transmit it to the Department. 

The education of the boys will comprise the elements of an ordinary English edu- 
cation, alternating with practical seamanship and other nautical occupations 
designed to make proficient sailors in the Navy. 

The prime object is to place in the naval service, with the consent of their parents, 
good and deserving boys who will elevate its standard, and make the Navy more 
reliable as an arm of the national defence. Boys who have been convicted of crime 
cannot, therefore, be received, as it is not advisable that they should become the 
associates of the better class. 

The boys will be enlisted as third-class boys, at the rate of $9.50 per month and 
one ration. While serving on the training-ships, they may, if deserving, be pro- 
moted to the rating of second and first-class boys, at the pay of $10.50 and $11.50 per 
month, respectively, and on cruising vessels will be entitled to higher ratings, at the 
discretion of their commanding officers, as a reward of proficiency and good conduct. . 

They will be furnished an outfit of clothing, the cost of which will be charged to 
their respective accounts, or the parents may purchase the necessary outfit from the 
paymaster of the ship and give it to their sons. 

Boys enlisted to serve until twenty-one years of age will not be permitted to allot 
any part of their pay to parents or guardians until they shall have thirty (30) dollars 
due them on the account books of the ship. 

At the discretion of the commanding officer, they may be allowed to draw from 
their accounts one dollar a month for pocket money, and also be permitted to go on 
shore on liberty, if out of debt. 

They will be transferred to sea-going vessels as they become proficient, accom- 
panied by the certificate of their commanding officer as to their conduct and quali- 
fications. 

If recommended for honorable discharge upon the expiration of their enlistments, 
they will receive continuous-service certificates, which, upon re-enlistment within 
three months from the date thereon, will entitle them to three months extra pay of 
their rating when discharged, and also to an addition of one dollar per month to 
their pay during such re-enlistment. 

Boys will not be discharged from the service until they have reached twenty-one 
years of age, excerpt uj>on a medical survey, inaptitude for the service, or for mis- 
conduct. 

Those injured in the service, or having contracted a disease in the line of duty, 
will be entitled to the benefits of a pension. 

These boys will be under the immediate supervision of the Bureau of Equipment 
-and Eecruiting, Navy Department, and applications for enlistment will be made to 
the Chief of that Bureau, or to the commanding officer of either of the following 
named ships, viz: U. S. S. "New Hampshire," Coasters' Harbor Island, near New- 
port, R. L; U. S. S. "Wabash," Navy Yard, Boston, Mass.; U. S. S. "Colorado," 
Navy Yard, N. Y.; U. S. S. " St. Louis," Navy Yard, League Island, Phila.; U. S. S. 
" Passaic," Navy Yard, Washington, D. C, and such other vessels as may from time 
to time be designated for this service. 

The boys will be sent to the U. S. Training-ship "New Hampshire," at Coasters' 
Harbor Island, as soon after enlistment as practicable. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Oeneral Order, No. 265. 

March 23, 1881. 
The Department is gratified to publish, with commendation, in a general order, 
the following order of the Superintendent of the Naval Academy, reporting the 
humane and noble conduct of Cadet Midshipman Timothy S. O'Leary, in rescuing 
from drowning, on the 6th of February last, two small boys who had broken through 
the ice in the Severn river, Marvland." 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

{Order No. 88.] U. S. Naval Academy, 

Annapolis Md., February 11, 1881. 
The Superintendent takes great pleasure in bringing to the notice of the cadets tin- highly commendable 
action of Cadet Midshipman T. S. O'Leary. of the :3d class, who, on the afternoon of the 6th instant, upon 
observing from his room two small boys break through the ice, about forty feet from the ferry landing, rushed 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 197 

from the building, without a moment's hesitation, and plunged into the water and succeeded in rescuing the 
little fellows from their perilous situation. For such bravery, performed at the risk of life, Cadet Midshipman 
O'Leary deserves the hearty congratulations of his comrades, and makes it the pleasant duty of the Superin- 
tendent to ptiblicly express his approbation <>\' his gallanl conduct in general ord< r at " parade." 

GEO. !'•. BALCH, 
Eear-Admiral, Superintendent. 



General Order, No. 266. 

March 25, 1881. 

The Department takes great pleasure in recognizing, in a general order, the heroism 
of Cadet Midshipman Joseph Beale, of the United States Navy, whose gallant con- 
duct has been reported to it by Rear-Admiral Clitz, commanding the U. S. naval 
force on the Asiatic Station, in a dispatch dated the 28th of October last, accom- 
panied by a communication from Commander Sampson, commanding the U. S. steamer 
Swatara, to which Cadet Midshipman Beale was attached. 

These reports show that Cadet Midshipman Beale, at the imminent risk of his own 
life, jumped overboard from a passenger steamer, which was at the time going at full 
speed, in the waters of Japan, and swam to and. rescued from drowning a warrant 
officer of the United States Navy, who had fallen overboard from that steamer. 

The humanity, bravery, and endurance of this young officer are of the highest 
order, and give promise for him of a useful career in the naval service. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 267. 

March 28, 1881. 
The following act of Congress is published for the information of all concerned. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

AN ACT to amend section fourteen hundred and eighty-six of the Revised Statutes in order to preserve the 
meaning of the original law from which it was taken, with reference to the rank of engineer officers, grad- 
uates of the Naval Academy. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That section fourteen hundred and eighty-six of the Revised 
Statutes of the United States be amended by inserting after the word "accordingly,"" 
at the end of the section, the words "Provided, That nothing in this section shall be 
so construed as togive to any officer of the staff corps precedence of, or a higher rela- 
tive rank than that of, another staff officer in the same grade and corps, and whose 
commission in such grade and corps antedates that of such officer.'' 

Approved, March 3, 1881. 



General Order, No. 268. 

April 2, 1881. 
Hereafter all payments for mileage will be made only at the Navy pay offices at New 
York, Washington, Philadelphia, Boston, San Francisco, Baltimore, and Norfolk, upon 
presentation of the original orders. Officers ordered to foreign stations who fail to 
receive their mileage for travel before leaving the United States must transmit their 
claims to the Fourth Auditor, accompanied by original orders. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 26. 

April 11, 1881. 
The undress uniform for officers of the Navy for official visits shall be as follows: 
Frock coats, epaulettes, cocked hat, sword and knot, full-dress belt, and full-dress 
trowsers. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secfretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 269. 

April 29, 1881. 
The steamer recently purchased for the Jeannette search expedition, and formerly 
known as the " Mary and Helen," will hereafter be known as the "Rodgers." Under 
this name she will be designated, and will be so registered in the Navy Department. 



198 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

This name is given her in recognition of the valuable aid rendered the Department 
by Rear-Admiral John Rodgers, as president of the Jeannette Relief Board, to whom 
were referred the direction of the search, the means best adapted to the search, and 
the details of the expedition. It is also deemed a proper tribute to his eminent repu- 
tation as an officer of the Navy and a distinguished explorer in the Arctic seas. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 270. 

May 9, 1881. 

Vessels of the Navy stationed or employed at any port or along any portion of the 
coasts of the United States, including Alaska, will not be considered as special sur- 
veying vessels for such ports or coasts, and all surveys executed, incidentally to other 
duty in such ports or along such coasts, shall be forwarded for publication to the 
Superintendent of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, who will, as always heretofore, 
give due and full credit in such publications to all parties concerned. 

Surveys and examinations of the unknown parts of our coast in Alaska, incidental 
to other regular duties of naval vessels, are to be encouraged. 

The Bureau of Navigation and Hydrographic Office of this Department will pub- 
lish no chart or charts of any harbor or portion of the coasts of the United States, 
Including Alaska, except general route charts, on small scales, of such portions of 
said coasts as are included between the territories of other countries, or are immedi- 
ately adjacent thereto. 

No officer of the Navy, shall change the name of, or give a new name to, any island, 
point of land, rock, shoal, or other natural object along the coasts of the United 
States, without referring the subject in official form to the Superintendent of the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey, who, by virtue of his office, is necessarily the umpire in 
all such cases. 

Every survey of any harbor or portion of the coasts of the United States, including 
Alaska, now in the possession of, or in course of preparation by, the Bureau of Navi- 
gation or the Hydrographic Office, will be forwarded to the Superintendent of the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey for publication ; and a complete list of all names which 
during the past five years have been or hereafter may be proposed to be changed, 
with the names proposed to be substituted, and also such as have been or may here- 
after be proposed for or given to supposed nameless localities during the same period, 
or in the future, will be sent to said Superintendent, who will give due consideration 
to all the conditions of each case and do full justice to all parties concerned. 

The Superintendent of the Coast and Geodetic Survey has, by law, charge and direc- 
tion of the " Survey of the Coasts of the United States," therefore all charts of the 
coasts of the United States, or of any portion thereof, must be issued under his 
direction. 

The custom of the Coast and Geodetic Survey is to preserve established names in 
whatever language they may be, and no change should be made without the knowl- 
edge of the Superintendent of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

These orders do not apply to surveys made outside the limits of the United States, 
although it is not advisable to change the names of places already laid down on 
oharts, as it tends to confuse navigators. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 271. 

May 11, 1881. 

The training vessels of the service having been brought together for the first time 
under one uniform system, the following order will be observed : 

I. Hereafter no apprentices will be transferred from the training-ships to the regu- 
lar ships of the Navy until such apprentices have been at least twenty months in the 
training-ships ; and not even then unless they are found able to perform the general 
duties of ordinary seamen. 

II. None of the apprentices shall be transferred from the training-ships until the 
latter part of October next. The vessels will go into winter quarters after their an- 
nual inspection. By delaying until then it is expected that a first rate class of boys 
will be transferred to the ships fitting out. 

III. The commanding officer of the training squadron will judge of the time when 
a boy is fit for transfer to the regular Navy, and when he has a class of boys ready 
for transfer to the naval service he will notify the Chief of the Bureau of Equipment 
and Recruiting, who will direct the transfer to such vessels as may require such boys 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 199 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 27. 

June 15, 1881. 
Paragraphs 43 and 44, Chapter VI, of the U. S. Navy Regulations of 1876, are repealed, 
aud the following substituted for them : 

Women shall not he allowed to reside on board vessels of the United States Navy 
in commission for sea-service ; nor shall they be taken as passengers on such vessels 
under any circumstances. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 18. 

June 23, 1881. 

All previous circulars of this Department, in relation to shipments of public 
freight to and from California, over the land-grant and bonded railroads, are annulled, 
and officers of the Navy and Marine Corps will be governed by the following instruc- 
tions in making such shipments : 

When a shipment is to be made, the articles will be properly packed for transpor- 
tation, appropriately marked, and placed in charge of the nearest officer of the Quar- 
termaster's Department who may be designated for this duty by the Secretary of 
War, who. at the request of the proper officer of this Department, will ship them 
through to their destination, and make up accounts for the same, to be forwarded, 
through the War Department, to the Navy Department for payment. 

No payments are to be made, directly or indirectly, by officers of the Navy or of 
the Marine Corps for freight shipped, on account of the Government, over any of the 
land-grant or bonded railroads; nor will such officers make arrangements with, or 
conditional purchases from, private parties, involving the shipment of articles for 
the public service by such parties over these railroads, and the subsequent payment 
by the Government of the freight charges on them. 

These regulations are not to forbid the shipping of articles by express, and the 
payment of the charges involved, when the exigencies of the public service require 
them to be so sent. 

The land-grant and bonded railroads referred to are — 

Union Pacific, Council Bluffs to Ogden, 1,033.46 miles 

Central Pacific, Ogden to San Jose, via Niles, 865.66 miles. 

Kansas Pacific, Kansas City to Denver, 638.6 miles. 

Central Branch Union Pacific, Atchison to Waterville, 100 miles. 

Sioux City and Pacific, Sioux City to Fremont, via California Junction 101.77 
miles. 

WILLIAM N. JEFFERS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 272. 

With a view to the further development of the training system, the following addi- 
tional regulations will be put in force : 

I. Apprentices who have been discharged with a continuous-service certificate as 
seamen, and who shall re-enlist for five years within three months after such dis- 
charge, may be admitted to the gunnery school for instruction in gunnery. 

II. The gunnery school will be established on board such vessel or vessels con- 
nected with the training station as may be hereafter designated, and will be termed 
the gunnery-ship. To be eligible for admission into this school, the candidate must 
be over twenty-one years of age and not over twenty-five. His record of conduct 
must be.unexceptionable. He must pass a first class examination as seaman, be able 
to read and write fluently, and be familiar with ordinary broadside drill. 

The course in gunnery shall last at least six months, and shall include progressive 
instruction at the different duties and stations of gun-numbers in the various crew 
formations adopted for general service — the duties of the gun-captain; construction 
and storage of magazines and shell-rooms; names and uses of the various kinds of 
projectiles, fuzes, primers, &c, and of all the implements used in ordinary service 
work by the gunner's gang. In addition to proficiency in practical work, the candi- 
date for a certificate must show his ability to station and exercise an uninstructed 
gun crew, and obtain a certain degree of excellence in target firing. 

In small-arms he must know the use and care of such small-arms or machine-guns 
as are supplied to the general service, with the principles of ordinary formations 
and manual of small-arms 

The course of instruction will also include broadswords, boxing and fencing, and 
the use of the diving apparatus (elective), and practical drill in laying out and 
handling torpedoes. 



200 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

III. Seamen who have successfully passed through the prescribed course will be 
given certificates as seamen-gun tiers, and a pay of twenty-four dollars ($24) per month 

IV. Seamen-gunners will be eligible to the rates of coxswains, captains of the tops, 
&c, at the current rates of pay. They will be deprived of their certificates as sea- 
men-gunners only by sentence of a general or summary court-martial. 

V. Every ship carrying heavy guns will be allowed one (1) seaman-gunner to each 
two (2) broadside guns, and one (1) to each pivot-gun, as gun-captain. 

VI. Commanders of vessels returning from a cruise, and having seamen appren- 
tices on board, will, immediately upon their arrival in a port of the United States, 
prepare and forward to the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting a list of such 
apprentices as may be eligible for admission into the gunnery school. 

VII. The Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting will grant all seamen apprentices 
returning from a cruise the usual leave of absence, and, at the expiration of their 
leave, those who have been recommended will be ordered to the officer commanding 
the training station for instruction. 

VIII. Seamen apprentices who have returned from a cruise, and who have not 
attained their majority, will, after the expiration of their leave, be sent to the 
training school to serve out their unexpired terms of enlistment. When there, those 
properly qualified will follow a course to prepare them for subsequent admission to 
the gunnery school. Those who have more than six months to serve will be liable 
to transfer to cruising vessels. 

IX. It is contemplated to have the positions of all gunnery petty officers filled, in 
time, exclusively by selection from among those who hold seamen-gunners' certifi- 
cates, and to require candidates for warrants as boatswain or gunner to hold certi- 
ficates as seamen -gunners. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 28. 

July 25, 1881. 
Paragraph 17, Chapter VI, of the U. S. Navy Regulations of 1876, is hereby amended 
so as to read as follows: 

Gambling is prohibited on board the vessels and in the navy yards, and in all other 
places belonging to or under the control of the Navy Department. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

August 11, 1881. 

The accompanying blank form of voucher for payments on account of official post- 
age and telegrams will hereafter be adopted by disbursing officers of the Navy. 

Disbursement for these objects will not be charged to the appropriation "Contin- 
gent Navy" unless on business or duty pertaining to the office of the Secretary of the 
Navy. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 273. 

August 18, 1881. 

To insure uniformity in the drills of the U. S. marines, commanding officers of ves- 
sels coming into any of our ports where there are marine barracks will lamd their 
marines and have them exercised, in company with the guard on shore, twice a week. 
If there is any duty on ship-board to prevent this order being carried out, the com- 
manding officer will report the same to the Department. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 19. 

August 23, 1881. 

I. No enlisted man or enlisted boy in the naval service of the United States shall 
be discharged from such service, except for cause, before the expiration of the term 
of his enlistment or engagement. Applications for discharge by a party himself, or 
by others in his behalf, must be made to the commanding officer of the ship, vessel, 
station, or navy yard in which the person desiring such discharge may at the time 
be serving: and such officer shall report his recommendation to the Department for 
its approval. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 201 

II. No commanding officer is authorized to recommend, the discharge of any enlisted 
man or boy upon merely the request or entreaty of such man or boy, his parents, 
friends, relatives, or others. Recommendations resting solely upon such considera- 
tions will be disregarded by the Department. 

III. Applications from Senators and members of the House of Representatives, and 
others in authority, and from relatives and friends of persons in the naval service, 
for the discharge of any enlisted man or boy will not be acted upon by the Depart- 
ment, except after they have been referred to and reported upon by the commanding 
officer or superior in authority under whom the person sought to be discharged is 
serving at the time. 

IV. The exigencies of the service, and the numerous applications for discharges 
daily pouring into the Department, render the inflexible observance of these rules 
necessary. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

U. 8. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 29. 

September 1, 1881. 
So much of U. S. Navy Regulation Circular No. 21, issued January 10, 1880, as 
purports to confer relative rank on clerks to pay officers. of the Navy is revoked. 

The uniform of clerks to pay officers of the Navy will be the same as it was prior 
to Regulation Circular No. 21. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Na<vy. 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 30. 

October 24, 1881. 
From and after the 1st of January next pay officers of the Navy will forward, with 
their quarterly accounts to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, receipts for all cloth- 
ing, small stores, and money issued to enlisted men who have deserted or died during 
the quarter, said receipts to show in writing the total amount issued in each case, and 
to be signed by the officer who witnessed the issue, and approved by the command- 
ing officer of the vessel, as required by paragraph 16, page 76, of the Navy Regulations. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



November 1, 1881. 

The following opinion of the Attorney General of the United States is published 
for the information of the Navy. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Department of Justice, 

Washington, D. C, June 17, 1881. 

Sir : Your letter of the 12th of April last, enclosing a communication from B. F. Chandler and others, civil 
engineers in the Navy, requests my opinion upon the following questions : 

"1. Are civil engineers of the Navy officers in the Navy, or civil officers connected with the Navy? 

"2. If it be held that civil engineers are officers in the Navy, are they entitled to be retired from active duty 
and placed on the retired list, under the provisions of law regulating the retirement of officers of the Navy?" 

In submitting these questions you state that prior to the act of March 2, 1867, civil engineers were appointed 
by the Secretary of the Navy, and that since then, under authority of that act (section 1413, Revised Statutes) 
they have been commissioned by the .President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate ; that they 
were appropriated for as part of the civil establishment at the several navy yards and stations, under the con- 
trol of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, until 1870, when their pay was regulated by the 3d section of the act of 
July 15 of that year (section 1556, Revised Statutes), fixing the annual pay of officers of the Navy on the active 
list ; and that appropriations for their pay have been made since 1870 under the head of "Pay of the Navy." 

You further state that the authority of the President, under the act of March 3, 1871, chapter 117 (section 
1478, Revised Statutes), "to determine and fix the relative rank of civil engineers," was not exercised until the 
24th of February last, when their rank was, by him, fixed as follows : One with the relative rank of captain, 
two with the relative rank of commander, three with the relative rank of lieutenant commander, and four with 
the relative rauk of lieutenant ; which action was promulgated by a General Order issued by the Secretary of 
the Navy on that day. 

The appointment of civil engineers is now regulated by section 1413, Revised Statutes, which provides that 
"the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, may appoint a civil engineer and a naval 
store-keeper at each of the navy yards where such officers may be necessary." Referring to this provision, 
Attorney General Devens, in an opinion dated November 18, 1878 (16 Opin., 203), remarks that it " indicates that 
the appointment is to some extent a local one, and that the appointee cannot be a naval officer in the full sense 
of the term." However, on examining section 1480, Revised Statutes, as amended by the act of February 27, 
1877, chapter 69, I find that civil engineers there appear to be distinctly recognized by Congress as one of the 
" staff corps of the Navy." Thus that section, as amended, declares that "the grades established in the six pre- 
ceding sections for the staf corps of the Navy shall be filled," etc. One of the "six preceding sections " is section 
1478, which provides for fixing the relative rank of civil engineers. These officers are plainly included among 
those contemplated by the amended section 1480 as belonging to the "staff corps of the Navy." Viewing, then, 
this legislation in connection with that to which you refer, I am led to the conclusion that the civil engineers 



202 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



in the naval service must be regarded as a staff corps of the Navy — that they are "officers in the Navy," pos- 
sessing (under the recent order made pursuant to section 1478, cited above) defined relative rank as such with 
other officers in the Navy, and are not merely "civil officers connected with the Navy." 

The next inquiry is, are they within the law providing for the retirement of naval officers from active service ? 

Originally, under the act of February 28, 1855, chapter 127, and its supplements, only line officers of the Navy 
were authorized to be retired ; that is io say, placed on a list called in that act " the reserved list." By the act 
of February 21, 1801, chapter 49, authority was given the President to retire medical officers of the Navy found 
permanently incapable of further service at sea. The act of August 3, 1801, chapter 42, made other aiiil more 
enlarged provision for the retirement of both line and staff officers, which superseded the previous provisions on 
the subject; and additional provision was made by the act of December 21, 1861, by which "any naval officer" 
in the service, after he "shall have been borne on the Naval Register forty-live years, or shall lie of the age of 
sixty-two years," was to be retired. The two last-mentioned acts, as it would seem, were construed to extend 
generally to the line and staff officers, including among the latter chaplains, professors of mathematics, and 
naval constructors. 

The law at present in force is contained in section 1443 et .*c</., in chapter 3, title 15, Revised Statutes. The 
language of that and the following section — " Any officer of the Navy." " Any officer below the rank of vice- 
admiral"— embraces by its generality officers in the several staff corps of the Navy as well as officers in the line. 
So, likewise, the words " any officer," in section 1448. The provisions of these sections (it is deemed unnecessary 
to particularize others) are not less comprehensive than those which were previously iu force. If civil engineers 
constitute, as I think they do, a staff corps of the Navy, these officers fairly come within the terms and scope of 
this legislation. I am accordingly of opinion that they may be retired thereunder from active service and placed 
on the retired list of the Navy. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, 

WAYNE MacVEAGH, 

Attorney General. 

Hon. William H. Hunt, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 275. 

The following opinion of the Attorney General of the United States is published for 
the information of the Navy. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C, August 11, 1881. 

Sir: I have the honor to reply to the question submitted to me in your favor of August 6, 1881, as to the 
claim of Passed Assistant Paymaster Jonathan Q. Barton, U. S. Navy, for advancement on the list of officers of 
the Pay Corps, under the provisions of section 1412 of the Revised Statutes. 

In deference to your wishes, I have reconsidered the question submitted by Mr. Barton, and have carefully 
examined the argument enclosed by you in support of the position assumed by him, but 1 cannot forbear saying 
that if any question ought to be considered as settled as between the Executive Departments of the Govern- 
ment, the proper construction of section 1412 of- the Revised Statutes is certainly within that categorj'. 

The true meaning of the provision in question was first considered by Attorney General Williams in the case 
of Lieutenant Commander Dyer, and his opinion was rendered March 3, 1873, in a letter to your predecessor, 
Secretary Robeson. It was again considered by Attorney General Williams at the instance of the Treasury 
Department, and an opinion upon it rendered June 24, 1874. It was again brought for review before my im- 
mediate predecessor, and an elaborate opinion upon the subject was rendered by him June 12, 1878. 

These several opinions are in entire agreement upon the question raised in your communication to me. They 
declare that the pro vision in question was designed to give the transferred officers the free benefit of their former 
sea-service, in so far as it might go to complete the period of such service required in their respective grades 
previous to examination for promotion, and in so far as it ought properly to be taken into account in the matter 
of assignment to duty, and that it conferred no advantages beyond these. 

It necessarily follows, as Attorney General Devens decided, that a volunteer officer transferred to the regular 
Navy is not entitled to hold a commission dated as of the date of his volunteer commission, but that he must 
take his place upon the register according to the rank given him by his commission as an officer of the regular 
Navy. 

In this construction of the provision in question I entirely concur, and I therefore advise you that Mr. Bar- 
ton's claim of a position in the regular Pay Corps above all officers in that corps who entered the regular service 
after June 2, 1804, is invalid and should not be allowed. 

I return herewith the papers which you enclosed to me. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WAYNE MacVEAGH, 

Attorney General. 

Hon. William H. Hunt, 

Secretary of the Nary. 



General Order, No. 276. 

November 1, 1881. 

The Department takes great pleasure in publishing, in a general order, the annexed 
report of Commander George B. White, commanding the United States steamer " Kear- 
sarge," of the gallant conduct of Cadet Midshipman John B. Bernadon and of Ordi- 
nary Seaman Robert Sweeney, in saving the life of E. M. Christoverson, a seaman of 
that vessel. 

The brave and successful efforts of this officer, and of Ordinary Seaman Sweeney, 
are highly appreciated, and a medal of honor, such as is provided for acts of heroism 
of enlisted men in the Navy, will be prepared for the latter. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 203 

I . s. 8. Kearsaroe (Third Rate), 

Hamptoh Roads, Va., October 27, 1881. 
Sir : It affords me a great deal of pleasure to report to the Department the gallant conduct of Cadet Midship- 
man J. B. Bernadon, U.S. Navy, and Robert Sweeney, ordinary seaman, in saving the life of E. M. Christover- 
son, a -~.-;ui i;in on board this vessel. About five o'clock p. u. on October 26th, this vessel being at anchor in Hamil- 
ton Roads, a strong tide running and considerable sea, < Ihristoverson fell overboard from the lower boom Jacob's 
ladder. He could not swim, and almost immediately commenced going under. Sweeney, without a moment's 
hesitation, jumped overboard to bis assistance. Christoverson, in his struggles, carried Sweeney down with 
him : the latter, breaking away from the drowning man, returned to the rescue, and was again carried under 
by Christoverson. Cadet Midshipman Bernadon then sprang overboard to Sweeney's assistance, and, a line 
having been thrown to them, they succeeded in getting Christoverson on board. It was a brave, plucky act on 
the part of C idet Midshipman Bernadon and Ordinary Seaman Sweeney, and to their bravery and prompt action 
we owe the life of one of our crew. I respectfully commend them to the consideration of the Navy Department. 
Very respect full v. your obedient servant, 

G. B. WHITE, 
Commander, commanding. 
Hon. William H. Hunt, 

S retary of (lie Navy, 

Washington, D. < . 



General Order. No. 277. 

November 17, 1881. 
The attention of commanding officers of naval vessels is called to the regulations 
regarding the employment of pilots, and to the fact that their services are authorized 
only when necessary. 

Commanding and navigating officers are expected to pilot their vessels under 
ordinary circumstances, and where such duty is not specially difficult. 

Hereafter, upon all vouchers for payment of pilots, the commanding officer will 
certify that the services of a pilot were thought necessary, and that he did not con- 
sider himself justified in running his ship without. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 278. 

Xovember 28, 1881. 

Commandants of navy yards, commanders of squadrons, and commanding officers 
of ships serving singly, will hereafter send all reports, letters, and telegrams relating 
to the movements of vessels of the Navy to the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation 
and Office of Detail, who will, in addition to his present duties, keep a record of their 
position and destination, and will prepare for the signature of the Secretary such 
orders and instructions upon these points as may he necessary. All orders or regu- 
lations conflicting with this order are herehy rescinded. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, . 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 279. 

December 2, 1881. 
The following decision of the Acting Postmaster General is published for the infor- 
mation and observance of officers of the Navy and Marine Corps. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

"The 29th section of the act of March 3, 1879 (Postal Laws and Regulations, sec- 
tion 251), extending to all officers of the United States Government the provisions of 
the sections numbered 249 and 250, Postal Laws and Regulations, for the transmission 
of official mail matter, requires all officers who are not departmental in their char- 
acter to use envelopes which bear the appropriate indorsements, containing the 
name of the office from which the same are transmitted, with a statement of the 
penalty for their misuse ; and the use of the envelopes must be absolutely restricted 
to official mail matter transmitted between officers of the United States or between 
any such officer and either of the Executive Departments or officers of the Govern- 
ment. 

"The signature of the officer and his official title is not a compliance with the 
law ; the name of the office from which they are transmitted must also be given on 
the envelope." 



General Order, No. 280. 

December 15, 1881. 
Every officer of the Navy visiting Washington will, within twenty-four hours after 
his arrival, register his name and city address at the Office of Detail, Navy Depart- 
ment. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



204 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 281. 

December 16, 1881. 

General Order No. 272 is modified as follows : 

Apprentices who have re-enlisted under continuous-service certificates for three 
years may be admitted to the gunnery- ship for instruction, subject to the conditions 
of paragraph II in the said order. When they shall have successfully passed the 
prescribed course they will receive certificates as seamen- gunners, and pay at the 
rate of $26.50 per month. 

The pay of seamen-gunners who re-enlist for three years will be $33.50 per month 
in addition to the longevity allowance due to the continuous-service certificate, pro- 
vided that the seaman-gunner shall pass a satisfactory examination (on board the 
gunnery-ship if practicable), and shall have received, during his service afloat, the 
favorable report of his commanding officer. 

No seaman-gunner shall receive the increased pay of $33.50 until he has served, as 
such, at least two years on board a sea-going vessel. 

Seamen-gunners may be required to perforin the duties of any petty officer, with 
the pay of that rating, if higher than their own. 

Such portions of General Order No. 272 as are not affected by this order will remain 
in force. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 20. 

December 22, 1881. 
In consequence of the numerous and increasing applications for the discharge of 
enlisted men of the Marine Corps, made by Senators and. Representatives in Congress, 
and others, the Department feels constrained to say that no such application can be 
favorably entertained, in the present condition of the service, unless the application 
be based upon such strong grounds as would entitle the applicant to be discharged 
on account of mental or bodily disability. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 282. 

January 6, 1882. 
The following opinion of the Attorney General of the United States is published for 
the information of the Navy. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C, February 25, 1881. 

Sir : Your letter of January 25 submits to ine the claim of Howard E. Ames, a passed assistant surgeon in the 
Navy, that he has been unlawfully deprived of his original relative position in the Medical Corps, by reason of 
the action taken upon the result of his examination for promotion. 

The facts in his case are as follows : 

Dr. Ames was appointed assistant surgeon in the Navy April 10, 1875, and assigned a position (No. 8) in the 
class of assistant surgeons appointed during that year, which class was arranged according to date of appoint- 
ment of the members thereof. 

Under the law and regulations of the Navy assistant surgeons are entitled to examination for promotion 
after three years' service. The class of 1875, having completed three years 1 service in the grade of assistant 
surgeon in 1878, were, as required by law, examined as to their qualifications for promotion to the grade of 
surgeon. 

At the conclusion of the examination of the officers of that class, Dr. Ames, with others who were found 
qualified for promotion, was assigned a position on the list of passed assistant surgeons according to relative 
merit as ascertained and reported by the Board of Examiners, and now occupies the relative position on the 
list of passed assistant surgeons which was assigned him in accordance with the finding and recommendation 
of the Board of Examiners, upon competitive examination. 

The practice of the Department requiring competitive examinations to determine the relative position of 
medical officers of the Navy preparatory to promotion to the grade of surgeon, which originated prior to the 
act of May 24, 1828 (sections 1370 and 1371 of the Revised Statutes), was recognized and confirmed by a clause 
in the act of Congress, approved March 3, 1835, which is embodied in the Revised Statutes, as follows: Section 
1372. "When any assistant surgeon was absent from the United States, on duty, at the time when others of 
his date were examined, he shall, if not rejected at a subsequent examination, be entitled to the same rank 
with them; and if, from any cause, his relative rank cannot be assigned to him, he shall retain his original 
position on the Register." 

The system of competitive examinations to determine the relative merit of assistant surgeons preliminary to 
promotion, and thus to define their rank by seniority, has, under this authority of law, been continued to the 
present time ; and the uniform practice of the Navy Department has been to assign to the members of each 
class of assistant surgeons, examined and found qualified for promotion, positions in accordance with their 
relative standing, as determined and reported by the Board of Medical Examiners. 

You request my opinion upon the following question : 

"Is the custom and practice of this Department, requiring competitive examinations of assistant surgeons 
preliminary to promotion, and assigning them positions on the Navy Register in the order of relative merit as 
ascertained and reported by the Board of Examiners, authorized by existing law and regulations?" 



. GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 205 

The construction adopted as to the clause in the act of Congress, approved .March:;, is:;."), has been so long 
practiced upon by the Navy Department, that I do not consider it necessary carefully to consider whether or 
not it was originally correct. Certainly there is much in the clause to countenance the system of competitive 
examination for the grade of passed assistant surgeon, and great and controlling weight must be attributed to 
the fact that those charged with the duty of executing the statutes have given to if their sanction, which 
should m>t be overruled without cogent reasons. 

Were this the only statute upon the subject I should, therefore, he of Opinion that the system as now adopted 
in the Navy was in accordance with the provisions of law. 

It is necessary, however, to consider some additional legislation. 

The act of March :'.. L871, chapter 117. section 10. Ill Statutes, 586, is as follows : 

"That the foregoing grades (the Medical Corps being included), hereby established for the Staff Corps of the 
Navy, shall he filled by appointment from the highest numbers in each corps, according to seniority, and that 
new commissions shall he issued to the officers so appointed, in which commissions the titles and grades herein 
established shall he inserted ; and no existing commission shall lie vacated in the said several Staff Corps, except 
by the issue of new commissions required by the provisions of this act, and no officer shall he reduced in rank 
or lose seniority in his own corps by any change which may he required under the provisions of this act." 
****** * 

This section contemplated, it seems to me, by the use of the words "highest numbers in each corps, according 
to seniority," that the promotions should he by seniority, and not by competitive examination; and the pro- 
vision that "no officer shall be reduced in rank or lose seniority," etc., contemplated also that, unless this 
provision were inserted, changes would be made in grades or numbers which had been theretofore fixed, which 
it was not the intention of Congress to disturb. This clause did not find its way into the original edition of the 
ltevised Statutes, but is found in the second edition, section 1480. It was, however, re-enacted in the act of 
February 27, 1877, chap. 69, 19 Stat., 244, in the following terms : 

"The grades established in the six preceding sections for the Staff Corps of the Navy shall be filled by ap- 
pointment from the highest members in each corps, according to seniority ; and new commissions shall be 
issued to the officers so appointed, in which the titles and grades established in said sections shall be inserted ; 
and no existing commission shall bo vacated in the said several Staff Corps, except by the issue of the new com- 
missions required by the provisions of this section ; and no officer shall be reduced in rank or lose seniority in 
bis own corps by any change which may be required under the provisions of the said six preceding sections." 
* * * . * * * * 

It will be observed that this is a substantial re-enactment, with the exception that the word "members" is 
used instead of "numbers," and the words "under the provisions of the said six preceding sections" are sub- 
stituted for the words "under the provisions of this act." These changes, apparently, have no other object 
than to adapt the statute to its place in the revision. The effect of it is to adopt the rule of seniority in regard 
to promotions from one grade to another in the Staff Corps, the section 1480 including, among other corps 
referred to, the Medical Corps. 

Your letter informs me that the relative positions in the Medical Corps of the Navy of all the officers of that 
corps now on the active list, above the grade of assistant surgeon, were determined after a competitive exami- 
nation for promotion. 

I will observe, however, that the statute last cited is prospective in its character, and is only to take effect 
from the date of its enactment. Its language contemplates that the rule prescribed by it may not have hereto- 
fore always been followed in reference to rank or seniority. 

In direct answer to your question, I am of opinion that the custom and practice of the Navy Department 
requiring competitive examination of assistant surgeons and assigning them positions on the Navy Register, in 
order of relative merit as ascertained and reported by the Board of Examiners authorized by existing law and 
regulations, is not, under the present law, correct. 

Having passed the necessary examination for promotion, the claim of Mr. Ames to he promoted according 
to seniority, is, in my opinion, well founded. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. DEVENS, 

Attorney General. 

Hon. Nathan Goff, Jr., 

Secretary of tin- Naoj. 



General Order, No. 283. 

January 6, 1882. 

The Attorney General having advised that, since the passage of the act of February 
27, 1877, chapter 69, amending section 1480 of the Revised Statutes, future promo- 
tions are, by law, required to be made by appointment from the highest members of 
the corps according to seniority, and not according to competitive examination, the 
names of the passed assistant surgeons will be arranged on the Register according to 
seniority, so as to indicate their relative rights to promotion. 

The Department having been advised that the act of February 27, 1877, is not retro- 
active, this arrangement will not affect those officers in the grades of surgeon, medi- 
cal inspector, and medical director, who have been heretofore appointed and com- 
missioned as surgeons in the order of competitive examination. 

The opinion of the Attorney General as to the grade of passed assistant surgeon 
produces the effect of restoring officers of that grade to the operation of the same law 
of promotion as prevails in every other branch of the service. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 



General Order, No. 284. 

January 7, 1882. 

The examination of seamen-apprentices who have returned from a foreign cruise 
has disclosed the fact that, in some instances, they have been retained in the same 
.station during the entire cruise. 

As a consequence, they exhibit but little knowledge of other parts of the ship, and 
of the duties pertaining to those parts. 



206 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. ' 

Commanding officers of ships having apprentices on board will see that this error is 
hereafter avoided. 

In all future inspections of ships returning from a cruise it will be the duty of the 
Board of Inspection to examine into the condition of the apprentices, and to report on 
the degree of attention which has been bestowed upon their instruction and im- 
provement. 

The training-ships can do little more than form the raw recruits and prepare them 
for the cruising-ships. It is the duty of the latter to carry on the course of practical 
instruction and to develop the boy into the seaman. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 285. 

January 17, 1882. 
Commandants of navy yards, commanders of stations, and of vessels acting singly, 
will report direct to the Chief of Bureau of Navigation and Office of Detail when- 
ever any officer under their respective commands is transferred to a naval hospital, 
and when such officer returns to duty. If a medical survey should be ordered, a copy 
of the order for the survey and a copy of the report of the medical officers in the case 
will also be forwarded to that Bureau. 

This order is not intended to dispense with the report required in such cases, by 
regulation, to be sent to the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy . 



General Order, No. 286. 

January 21, 1882. 

Section 1571 of the Revised Statutes provides that "no service shall be regarded as 
sea-service except such as shall be performed at sea, under the orders of a Department and in ves- 
sels employed by authority of law." 

From and after the 1st of January, 1882, the officers serving on the following named 
vessels will only be credited on the Navy Register with u sea-service" when the ves- 
sels are under way, viz : the New Hampshire and Minnesota at Newport, Rhode 
Island ; the Wyoming at Port Royal, South Carolina ; the Alarm at Washington ; and 
the Intrepid at New York. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 287. 

February 3, 1882. 

The frequency with which punishment, by solitary confinement on bread and water, 
or on diminished rations, is imposed by the sentences of summary courts-martial, 
meets with the disapprobation of the Department. 

This punishment is a severe one ; and it was not, probably, contemplated by the 
law that it should be generally resorted to for the correction of offenders. It is 
believed that other authorized punishments will, in most cases, prove more effectual 
than this. In cases where punishment by confinement, on bread and water or dimin- 
ished rations, is imposed by sentence of courts-martial, that portion of such sentences 
will be disapproved by the Department. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 228. 

February 9, 1882. 

General Order No. 286, issued on the 21st ultimo, is hereby annulled from this date. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

February 20, 1882. 
A typographical error having occurred in the foregoing General Order, in using the 
word this instead of that, it will be read "from that date," instead of from this date. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



207 



General Order, No. 289. 

February 11, 1882. 

Apothecaries will not, hereafter, he required to sign the " Shipping Articles." 
They will be appointed by the medical officer, subject to the approval of the com- 
manding officer, and will be entered on the ship's books upon taking the oath of 
allegiance and signing an agreement to serve faithfully for the cruise : to* be amen- 
able to the laws, regulations, and discipline of the service and of the ship, and to be 
discharged, in case of misbehavior, in any port, foreign or domestic, without claim 
for passage money, on the approval of the commanding officer. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 290. 

February 21, 1882. 

The attention of commanders-in-chief and commanding officers is called to that 
portion of the U. S. Navy Regulations (paragraph 38, page 39) which permits the 
junior officers to take the deck at sea under charge of the officers of the watch. 

Every opportunity should be given the junior officers to familiarize themselves 
with the handling of ships, and to gain experience in performing duties which pre- 
pare them for emergencies, and which serve in part to fit them for command. That 
officers shall thoroughly understand the "turning powers" of their ships, frequent 
exercises shall be had, when cruising under steam, in manoeuvring about empty bar- 
rels or buoys laid out to represent dangers or an enemy. 

Skill in handling ships can be acquired only by actual practice ; and commanders- 
in-chief shall send the vessels under their command to sea for several days in each 
quarter ibr the purpose of exercising the officers and crews in working the ships 
under sail and under steam; and commanding officers will be required to report 
quarterly upon the relative proficiency displayed by their subordinates. 

Hereafter the instruction in steam enginery, begun at the Naval Academy, will be 
continued on board of all steam vessels-of-war in commission; and ensigns, midship- 
men, and cadet midshipmen shall be assigned to duty in the fire and engine-rooms 
whenever steam-power is used. They shall be divided into three or more watches, 
and shall serve alternately on deck and below during the day watches. 

Commanding officers shall afford time and opportunities, and shall require the chief 
engineer and assistant engineers to instruct these officers in acquiring a thorough 
knowledge of the steam machinery and boilers of the Ship and of their management. 

Reports showing the proficiency and reliability of the officers above mentioned in 
steam enginery will be made out according to annexed forms, and forwarded to the 
Bureau of Navigation at the end of every quarter, for use at future examinations for 
promotion. 

Graduates of the Naval Academy leave the school with, perhaps, comparatively 
little practical experience of the duties on board cruising-ships, but they have an 
excellent foundation to build upon; and it is the imperative duty of commanding 
officers not only to afford them opportunities for acquiring professional skill, but to 
see that they avail themselves fully of every opportunity. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Report of Ensigns, Midshipmen, and Cadet Midshipmen who have been on duty or under 

instruction in the Fire and Engine-rooms of the U. S. S. , for the week 

ending , 188 . 



Name. 



Rank. 



Character of £ § 
instruction g g 
received or \ A © 

*cluty per- «w.S 
formed. ' ° g> 



Character of 
instruction 
received or 
duty per- 
formed. 



If instructed, 
by whom. 



5 £ 

- i 

o ~ 



Remarks. 



Respectfully submitted, 
To Commanding Officer. 



Chief Engineer. 



Note. — The "instruction received" or "duty performed" shall be specified in detail in the proper column,, 
and in the column "remarks" the chief engineer shall insert the proficiency of each officer instructed. 



208 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



Beport of instruction received or duty performed by the Ensigns, Midshipmen . 
Midshipmen of the U. S. S. , for the quarter ending 



and Cadet 
188 . 



Rank. 



Character of 
instruction 
received or 
duty per- 
formed. 



Character of 
instruction 
received or 
duty per- 
formed. 


No. of hours ship 
steamed during 
quarter. 







Remarks. 



Respectfully submitted, 
To Chief of the Bureau of Navigation. 



Commandtiig Oifi<- 



General Order, No. 291. 



March 2, 1882. 



The Department deems it proper to call attention to the practice of holding surveys 
without proper authority. It is believed that irregularities have been allowed to 
grow into use on this subject, which will be avoided in future by a more strict regard 
to the Regulations for the Government of the Navy, chapter XIV, paragraphs 1, 18, 
et ibid. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 292. 

March 23, 1882. 
An " Office of Intelligence " is hereby established in the Bureau of Navigation for 
the purpose of collecting and recording such naval information as may be useful to 
the Department in time of war, as well as in peace. 

To facilitate this work, the Department Library will be combined with the '' Office 
of Intelligence,' 7 and placed under the direction of the Chief of the Bureau of Navi- 
gation. 

Commanding and all other officers are directed to avail themselves of all oppor- 
tunities which may arise to collect and forward to the "Office of Intelligence" pro- 
fessional matter likely to serve the object in view. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 293. 

March 30, 1882. 
The duties of the Bureaus of this Department will hereafter be as follows : 

BUREAU OF ORDNANCE. 

The duties of the Bureau of Ordnance shall comprise all that relates to offensive 
and defensive arms and apparatus (including torr>edoes), all ammunition, war ex- 
plosives, vessels for submarine torpedo service, magazines on shore, and lighting for 
military purposes. Also all machinery, apparatus, equipments, and things for use 
with the above, including all electrical supplies therefor. 

It shall be charged with the duty of determining the nature of the armament to 
be carried by vessels, and will prescribe the material, kind, and qualities of ship's 
armor and dimensions of gun-turrets; also within the carrying power of vessels, as 
determined by the Bureau of Construction and Repair, it will fix the location and 
command of the armament, and distribute the thickness of armor. 

It shall place the armament on board of vessels, and will determine the method of 
construction of their armories and ammunition-rooms. The location of these latter 
it will determine in cod junction with the Bureau of Construction and Repair. 

Purchased torpedo vessels of less than eighty (80) tons displacement shall be pro- 
cured by this Bureau, which is charged with all their details of whatever nature. 
It shall also prescribe the armament, handiness, and minimum speed to be given to 
all torpedo vessels. 

It shall design the various shops and buildings at the navy yards where its work 
is executed, so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same; but the construction and 
repairing of those shops and buildings shall not be done by the Bureau of Ordnance, 
nor shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 209 

It shall design, erect, and maintain all the shops and buildings constructed for its 
purposes outside the limits of navy yards, and tor which it may have estimated; 
and it shall, subject to the provisions of law, he charged with the purchase, sale, 
and transfer of all land and buildings in connection therewith, and with the pres- 
ervation of the public property under its control. It shall determine upon and 
furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, blank books and forms, materials, means and 
appliances of every kind used in its shops, including fuel and transport, erect and 
repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, 
including clerks, writers, and draughtsmen, master workmen, and laborers connected 
with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for, and pay from its own funds, the cost necessary to carry out 
its duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND RECRUITING. 

The duties of the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting shall comprise all that 
relates to the recruiting, discharging, and estimating for the pay of all enlisted per- 
sons, including appointed petty officers, for general and special service, and to the 
equipment of all vessels with rigging, sails, anchors, cables, yeoman's stores, and 
furniture not provided by other Bureaus ; the furnishing of all vessels with fuel for 
all purposes, and to the transportation and mooring of vessels in ordinary at navy 
yards. 

It shall have under its sole control all rendezvous and receiving-ships, and it shall 
provide transportation for all enlisted persons and appointed petty officers. 

It shall have under its sole control the ropewalks, and the shops for making 
anchors and cables, rigging, sails, galleys, and cooking utensils. 

It shall establish the complement of the crews of all vessels in commission. 

It shall design the various shops and buildings where its work is executed, so far 
only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and after their completion shall 
have exclusive control of the same ; but the constructing and repairing of these shops 
and bliildings shall not be done by the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, nor 
shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, blank books, 
and forms used in the Equipment and Recruiting Department, materials, means, and 
appliances of every kind used in its buildings and shops, and erect and repair the 
same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and preser- 
vation of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, 
including clerks, writers, messengers, master workmen, and laborers connected with 
it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for, and pay from its own funds, the cost necessary to carry out 
its duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

BUREAU OF NAVIGATION. 

The duties of the Bureau of Navigation shall comprise all that relates to the Naval 
Observatory, Nautical Almanac, Hydrographic Office, Department Library, and Office 
of Intelligence. 

It shall furnish navigation supplies and stores of all kinds, including charts, nau- 
tical and navigating instruments and books, sailing directions and instructions, 
stationery, and blank books for commanding and navigating officers ashore and 
afloat, libraries, binnacles, flags, signal-lights, running-lights, and standing-lights on 
board vessels, including electrical apparatus for lighting purposes, logs, leads, lines, 
and glasses, log-books, illuminating oil for all purposes, except what is used in the 
engineer department of steamers. 

It will pay for the local pilotage of all vessels in commission. 

It shall have the sole control of the apartments assigned for its purposes, and for the 
use of the navigation officers in the yards and stations, and it will provide the instru- 
ments, clerks, writers, draughtsmen, messengers, and laborers for the same. 

14 



210 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

It shall be charged with the collection of foreign surveys, publication of charts, 
sailing directions, and nautical works, and the dissemination of nautical and hydro- 
graphical information to the Navy and mercantile marine. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the stores, materials, instruments, means 
and appliances of every kind used for its purposes, and shall have under its sole con- 
trol their inspection, storing, and preservation. 

It shall design, erect, and maintain all the buildings at the observatory and else- 
where, not within navy yards, that may be needed for its purposes ; and it shall, sub- 
ject to the provisions of law, be charged with the purchase, sale, and transfer of all 
land and buildings in connection therewith. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing clerks, writers, calculators, and draughtsmen, master workmen, and laborers 
connected with it, and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be addressed 
to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for, and pay from its own funds, the cost necessary to carry out 
its duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS. 

The duties of the Bureau of Yards and Docks shall comprise all that relates to the 
construction and maintenance of all docks (including dry-docks), slips, wharves, 
piers, quay walls, and buildings of all kinds, for whatever purpose needed, within 
the limits of the navy yards and of the naval asylum ; but not of hospitals and maga- 
zines outside of those limits, nor of buildings for which it does not estimate. It shall 
prepare the plans and make the estimates for the above constructions, in consulta- 
tion with the Chief of the Bureau for whose use they are designed, as to their internal 
arrangements and location in the yard. It shall repair and furnish all buildings, 
stores, and offices in the several navy yards. 

It shall, subject to the provisions of law, be charged with the purchase, sale, and 
transfer of all land and buildings connected with the navy yards. 

It shall have under its sole control the general administration of the navy yards, 
and shall provide all the water and gas for all the buildings, and for whatever % other 
purposes they may be needed, and all the fuel, except what is to be furnished by the 
other Bureaus. 

It shall provide, and have sole control of, all landings, derricks, sheers, cranes, 
sewers, dredging, railway tracks, cars and wheels, trucks, grading, paving, walks, 
shade-trees, enclosure wall and fences, ditching, reservoirs, cisterns, fire-engines and 
apparatus, and all things necessary, including labor for the cleaning of the yards, all 
watchmen, and the protection of the public property. 

It shall furnish furniture, stationery, blank books and forms, also the clerical 
force, messengers, and laborers necessary for the commandant's, captain's, and civil 
engineer's office, and pay the expenses of the same. 

It shall furnish the oxen, horses, and hired teams required for all the purposes in 
and for the yard, the subsistence and care for the same, and the necessary teamsters. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, materials, means and 
appliances of every kind used for its purposes, and transport and erect them, and 
repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of its materials, and the pay, organization, mustering, and detailing of the labor, 
including writers and draughtsmen at the yards, master workmen, and laborers paid 
from its funds and connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for, and pay from its own funds, the cost necessary to carry out its 
duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given by the Chief of 
Bureau to the commandants of navy yards, who will be held responsible for their exe- 
cution. 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR. 

The duties of the Bureau of Construction and Kepair shall comprise all that relates 
to designing, building, fitting, and repairing the hulls of vessels, spars, boats, cap- 
stans, windlasses, steering-gear, ventilating apparatus, tanks, ballast, casks, blocks, 
furniture for ship's use of the kind made in the navy yards, and lumber, plates, and 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 211 

tools for sea-stores of the kind used by it in building vessels; also the turrets and 
armor-plating after the material, quality, and distribution of thickness have been 
determined by the Bureau of Ordnance. 

It shall design the slips and the various buildings and shops where its work is exe- 
cuted, so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their comple- 
tion, shall have exclusive control of the same, including dry-docks; but the construct- 
ing and repairing of these buildings, slips, and docks shall not be done by the Bureau 
of Construction and Repair, nor shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all tools, stores, stationery, books and forms 
required in the constructor's department, materials, fuel, means and appliances of 
every kind used in its buildings aud shops, and erect and repair the same. 

It shall make all contracts for and superintend all work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, 
including clerks, writers, draughtsmen, and messengers at the yards and stations, 
master workmen, ship-keepers, and laborers connected with it and used entirely for 
its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. , 

It shall have control of all vessels building and under repair, and also be responsible 
that vessels in ordinary do not go to decay for want of proper examination on the 
part of constructors in the yards. 

It will have charge of the docking of vessels. 

It shall estimate for, and pay from its own funds, the cost necessary to carry out 
its duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected Avith the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

BUREAU OF STEAM ENGINEERING. 

The duties of the Bureau of Steam Engineering shall comprise all that relates to the 
designing, building, fitting out, repairing, ant engineering of the steam machinery 
used for the propulsion of naval vessels, and wilf also include steam-pumps, steam 
heaters and connections, and the steam machinery necessary for actuating the appa- 
ratus by which turrets are turned. 

It shall design the various shops at the navy yards and stations where the work is 
executed, so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their 
completion, shall have exclusive control of the same; but the construction and 
repairing of these shops shall not be done by the Bureau of Steam Engineering, nor 
shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the machinery, tools, stores, stationery, 
blank books and forms used in the engineer department, materials, means and 
appliances of every kind used in its shops, including fuel, and on board vessels, ex- 
cluding fuel, and erect and repair the same. 

It shall make all the contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing writers, clerks, messengers, and draughtsmen, at the yards and stations, master 
workmen and laborers connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties shall be 
addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for, and pay from its own funds, the cost necessary to carry out 
its duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

BUREAU OF PROVISIONS AND CLOTHING. 

The duties of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing shall comprise all that relates 
to supplying the Navy with provisions, clothing, small stores, water, and contingent 
stores in the Paymaster's Department. 

It shall design the various buildings and shops at the navy yards where its work 
is executed and its stores are kept, so far only as their internal arrangements are 
concerned ; and, after their completion, shall have exclusive control of the same ; 
but the construction and repairing of those buildings and shops shall not be done by 
the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, nor shall the cost thereof be defrayed by it. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the tools, stores, stationery, blank books 
and forms used in the Pay and Provisions Department, materials, means and appli- 
ances of every kind used in its buildings and on board vessels ; it shall furnish all 
the stores connected with the Paymaster's Department, including potable water for 
ship's use, other than that which is supplied by the distilling apparatus on board- 



212 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

It shall have under its sole control the reception, inspection, storing, and prepara- 
tion of all its materials, and the pay, organization, and mustering of the labor, includ- 
ing clerks, writers, master-workmen, and laborers connected with it and used entirely 
for its purposes. 

All reports, surveys, accounts, pay-rolls, and communications relating to its duties 
shall be addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for, and pay from its own funds, the cost necessary to carry out 
its duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 

The duties of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery shall comprise all that relates to 
laboratories, naval hospitals, and dispensaries. 

It shall furnish all the supplies, medicines, and instruments required in the Medi- 
cal Department of the Navy. 

It shall have the sole control of all buildings erected for its purposes. 

It shall determine upon and furnish all the stores, stationery, blank books and 
forms used in the Medical and jBospital Departments, materials, instruments, means 
and appliances of every kind used for its purposes ; and shall have under its sole 
control their inspection, storing, transportation, and preparation. 

It shall design, erect, furnish, and maintain all the buildings constructed for its 
purposes outside the limits of the navy yards, and for which it may have estimated , 
and it shall, subject to the provisions of law, be charged with the purchase, sale, and 
transfer of all land and buildings in connection therewith, a,nd with the preservation 
of the public property under its control. 

It shall design the various buildings erected within navy yards for its purposes, 
so far only as their internal arrangements are concerned, and, after their completion, 
shall have exclusive control of the same ; but the construction and repairing of these 
buildings shall not be done by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, nor shall the 
cost thereof be defrayed by it. t 

It shall have under its sole control the pay, organization, and mustering of the 
labor of all kinds connected with it and used entirely for its purposes. 

It shall make all the contracts for and superintend all the work done under it. 

All reports, surveys, applications for discharge of invalids, pay-rolls, and commu- 
nications relating to its duties shall be addressed to and received from it. 

It shall estimate for, and pay from its own funds, the cost necessary to carry out 
the duties as above defined. 

Orders relating to matters connected with the Bureau will be given to the com- 
mandants of the navy yards, who will be held responsible for their execution. 

Any and all orders conflicting with this order are hereby annulled. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 294. 

April 13, 1882. 

The traveling expenses of pay-officers' yeomen and of apothecaries, referred to in 
paragraph 108, page 131, Regulations of the Pay Department, U. S. Navy, are 
restricted to the following allowances : 

Second-class tickets, whenever procurable, to be furnished by a pay officer upon 
the order of the Navy Department. 

Subsistence expenses, not to exceed two dollars a day, when necessarily delayed 
awaiting the sailing of steamers or departure of trains. But no allowances are 
authorized while traveling on steamers in addition to the ticket furnished for passage. 

When travel is performed overland, under the order of the Department, or under 
an order from proper authority approved by it, the allowance for subsistence en route 
must not exceed two dollars a day. No allowance for sleeping cars is authorized. 

WILLIAM H. HUNT, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular No. 21. 

April 20, 1882. 
The Navy Department has been notified that the governments of Great Britain and 
Austria have issued orders to suspend, until September 1, 1882, paragraphs (c), (d), 
(e), (/), and (g) of Article X of the "Revised International Regulations" for pre- 
venting collisions at sea, published in General Order No. 253, July 16, 1880. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 213 

General Order, No. 295. 

May 2, 1882. 

As officers of the Navy and Marine Corps are now entitled by law to eight cents a 
mile for travel performed outside the United States under proper orders, the follow- 
ing table of distances over foreign routes has been prepared for the use of the 
accounting officers of the Treasury, and for the guidance of such pay officers of the 
Navy and Marine Corps as are authorized to pay mileage to officers for travel 
actually performed over the routes indicated. 

The provisions of General Order No. 268, issued April 2, 1881, by the Secretary of 
the Navy, are so far extended as to authorize pay officers on foreign stations to pay 
mileage for travel performed outside the United States under orders from the Secre- 
tary of the Navy, or by his direction or approval. No mileage for travel performed 
under orders from commanding officers can be paid until such orders are approved 
by the Secretary of the Navy. 

Return-mileage for foreign travel can only be paid by the Navy pay offices men- 
tioned in General Order No. 268, and by the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 
— Secretary of the Navy. 

BUREAU OF NAVIGATION, 

Hydrographic Office, 

Washington, April 28, 1882. 
The following named distances have been computed or measured by Lieutenant 
Commander F. W. Dickins, U. S. Navy, and Master W. H. H. Southerland, U. S. 
Navy, and are expressed in statute miles. 

In reducing the nautical measurements the value of the nautical mile was con- 
sidered as equal to the one-sixtieth part of the length of a degree on a great circle 
of a sphere, the surface of which was considered equal to the surface of the earth: 
6080.27 feet. 

The sea distances were taken from anchorage to anchorage by the most direct sea 
routes, except across the great oceans, where they were computed on great circle 
routes. 

European railway distances were taken from "Cook's Continental Time Tables." 
Partial and intermediate distances may be deduced by simple calculations. 

J. C. P. De Krafft, 
Commodore y U. S. Navy, Hydrographer. 



Table of Foreign Distances, to which is added a Supplement containing Water Boutes between 

ports in the United States. 

Miles. ! Miks. 

Aden to Point de Galle 2,49(3 Hong Kong to Manila 726 

Pnlo Penang 3,881 Hong Kong to Singapore 1,69 

Singapore 4,313 • Liverpool to Queeiistown 304 

Batavia 4,919; Boston 3,267 

Sidney 9,404 j Liverpool to Queenstown 304 

Melbourne 10,068 Baltimore 3,874 

Aden to Bombay 1,891 ' Liverpool to Bordeaux 829 

Point de Galle 2,954; Lisbon 1,672 

Madras , 3,552! Pernambuco , 5,302 

Calcutta 4,436 Liverpool to Bordeaux 829 

Aden to Point de Galle 2,496 Lisbon 1,672 

Albany, Australia 6,318 ; Porto Grande 3,463 

Melbourne 7,903 i Pernambuco 5,312 

Brindisi to Corfu 137 '■. London to Southampton 80 

Cerigo 462 ■ Cherbourg 179 

Syra 610 ■ London to Lisbon 1,134 

Smyrna 782 ! Funchal 1,747 

Constantinople 1,102 Porto Grande 2,944 

Brindisi to Cerigo 462 Bathurst 3,547 

Athens 603 1 Sierre Leone 4,011 

Syra 697 Cape Town 7,605 

Brindisi to Alexandria 966 London to Dover 80 

Port Said 1,136 Calais 104 

Hong Kong to Swatow 204, Paris 289 

Amoy 344 , London to Newliaven 51 

Foo-chow 5911 Dieppe 125 

.Shanghai 1,124 j Paris 250 

Nagasaki 1,656 ; London to Folkstone 74 

Viadovostock 2,413 Boulogne 104 

Hong Kong to Saigon 1,118 j Paris 263 

Singapore 1,861 j London to Gibraltar 1,524 

Palo Penang 2,292 Malta 2,674 

Madras 3,743 | Port Said 3,766 



214 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



Table 


of Foreign 


Distances, etc. — Continued. 










Miles. 

3,869 

5,372 

42 

140 

144 

251 

308 

354 

513 

726 

919 

1,(161 

726 

933 

1,643 

3,486 

4,770 

5,213 

6,050 

7,234 

1,433 

1,910 

2,060 

2,225 

2,453 

3,182 

3,486 

3,706 

2,303 

2,350 

2,303 

2,589 

3,518 

3,481 

3,558 

414 

1,118 

1,372 

1,719 

1,949 

2,616 

3,220 

3,42^ 






Miles. 

3,648 

3,924 

734 


Aden _ _ _ 








rail. 

rail. 

. _ .rail. 




rail. 


Nice 

Yille Francne. . 


St. Petersburg 


rail. 

rail 


1,712 
501 


Genoa. 


rail. 

rail. 

rail. 






605 


Spezzia 

Pisa_ 


Pisa 


rail. 


708 


Leghorn 

Paris to Turin 


rail. 

rail. 


719 


Civita Vecchia 

Naples 


rail. 


501 
605 






Civita Vecchia 

Naples 

Brindisi 


rail. 

rail. 

rail. 


867 






1,080 

1,348 

536 


Marseilles to Naples 


all rail 


New York to St. Thomas 




Paris to Cherbourg 

Paris to Havre 

Paris to Antwerp 

Philadelphia to Queenstown 

Liverpool 

Loudon 

Philadelphia to Southampton 


rail. 

rail. 

rail. 


232 
142 


Pernambuco 




256 
3,380 






3,683 
3,903 
3,715 

3,678 


Montevideo 




Progreso 

Oampeche 

Frontera 


------------ 






3,755 


Philadelphia to Antwerp 




3,978 
1,774 
2,153 
3,836 
5,205 
7,085 
2,418 
5,636 
7,585 
8,250 




Acapulco 

Panama 




Liverpool .*_ 




New York to Aspinwall 

Panama 

New York to Aspinwall 

Grey town 


Hong Kong 

San Francisco to Honolulu 

N'galoa ., 

Sidney 

Melbourne 

Yokohama to Kobe 








397 






831 


Panama to Bneneventura 




Shanghai 

Cheefoo 

Tien-Tsin 




1,364 

1,956 

2,248 

397 

831 


Payta _ ___ . . 




Chimbote 




Yokohama to Kobe 










1,364 
2,323 


Camera 

Coquimbo 




Hong Kong 





SUPPLEMENT. 

The following distances are water routes between ports in the United States, and are those in 
use at the U. S. Treasury Department. The distances are expressed in statute miles. 



Miles. 

Baltimore to Kev West 1,257 

Norfolk 194 

Fortress Monroe 182 

Yorktown 151 

Oxford 60 

Cambridge 71 

Easton 74 

Crisfield 122 

Boston to Norfolk 686 

Brandon (lower) to Richmond 60 

Brandon (upper) to Richmond 54 

Brandon (upper) to Fortress Monroe 59 

Brandon (upper) to Norfolk 65 

Brandon (lower) to Fortress Monroe 54 

Brandon (lower) to Norfolk 60 

Cedar Keys to Key West ^ 330 

Georgetown, S. C.,'to Port Royal 124 

New Orleans to Key West 662 

New Orleans to Havana, via Key West 766 

New Orleans to Pensacola via Mississippi sound 192 

New Orleans to Pensacola (outside) 245 

Newport to Providence 25 

Bristol 13 

Fall River 18 



Miles. 

New York to New London 117 

Newport 158 

Norfolk 328 

Baltimore 481 

Washington 482 

Port Royal 783 

Key West 1,336 

Pensacola 1,897 

New Orleans 1,990 

Portland to Kalama 42 

Port Townshend to Taconia 94 

San Francisco to Portland 723 

San Francisco to Santa Barbara 325 

San Diego 513 

Cape St. Lucas 1,331 

La Paz 1,500 

Sitka to Portland J 1,218 

Wrangel 187 

Tacoma to Kalama 105 

Victoria to Port Townshend 40 

Washington to Norfolk 196 

Fortress Monroe^ . 183 

Wrangel to Victoria 750 

Yorktown to Norfolk 48 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 215 

General Order, No. 296. 

May 12, 1882. 

General Order No. 181, of November 18, 1872, authorizing an advance of three 
months' pay to officers ordered to the Asiatic Station, is so far modified as to include 
officers ordered to the South Atlantic, European, and Pacific stations. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

/Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 31. 

The attention of commandants of stations and other persons in the naval service 
is called to paragraph 14, section 5, chapter XXIII, of the U. S. Navy Regulations, in 
relation to the shipment of stores or freight. 

Care must be taken that the bills of lading show whether the articles are to be 
delivered at the railroad depot or steamer landing, or at the navy yard or other spec- 
ified place, and that the rate or amount of freight to be paid is stated in the bills. 

Officers to whom freight is consigned will promptly report to the Department any 
failure to comply with the regulation referred to. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 32. 

June 10, 1882. 
Paragraph 24, page 27, U. S. Navy Regulations, is not to be interpreted as author- 
izing the commander-in-chief of a squadron to detach officers from their ships at the 
expiration of three years' service and send them to the United States at the public 
expense ; nor to send home enlisted men at the expiration of their terms of enlistment, 
except in public vessels. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 22. 

June 24, 1882. 
The "Danger Flag," as represented on Plate III of the U. S. Naval Signal Book, 
shall hereafter consist of a white ground with but one blue band, which shall extend 
from the inner lower extremity of the "hoist" diagonally across the ground to the 
outer upper extremity of the "fly." 

This flag shall be supplied to each ship, and shall correspond in dimensions with 
Despatch Flag No. 2. 

The "Position Pennant," as represented on the same plate of the signal book, shall 
in future be designated the "Position Flag." 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 297. * 

July 7, 1882. 
On and after the 1st of August next, the "New Hampshire," the "Minnesota," the 
" Intrepid," and the "Alarm" will not be considered as in commission for sea-service. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 298. 

August 5, 1882. 
The act making appropriations for the naval service for the fiscal year ending Jyne 
30, 1883, approved August 5, 1882, provides that " officers of the Navy traveling 
abroad, under orders hereafter issued, shall travel by the most direct route, the occa- 
sion and necessity for such order to be certified by the officer issuing the same ; and 
shall receive, in lieu of the mileage now allowed by law, only their actual and reason- 
able expenses, certified under their own signatures and approved by the Secretary of 
the Navy." 

Officers of the Navy issuing orders and those receiving them for traveling abroad 
will be governed by the requirements of the clause of the naval appropriation act 
above quoted. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



216 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 300. 

August 9, 1882. 
The flag of the President of the United States shall consist of a blue ground with 
the arms of the United States in the center, and shall he of the dimensions prescribed 
for the admiral's flag No. 1. 

The flag shall be hoisted at the main of vessels-of-war "while the President is on 
board, and shall be carried in the bow of his boat. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 299. 

August 10, 1882. 
The following act of Congress is published for the information and government of 
all concerned. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Xavy. 

AN ACT making appropriations for the naval service for the fiscal year ending Jnue thirtieth, eighteen hun- 
dred and eighty-Three, and fur other purposes. 

5f * * TT Tf 7f * 

Provided, That hereafter there shall be no appointments of cadet-midshipmen or 
cadet-engineers at the Naval Academy, but in lieu thereof naval cadets shall be 
appointed from each Congressional district and at large, as now provided by law 
for cadet-midshipmen, and all the undergraduates at the Naval Academy shall here- 
after be designated and called "naval cadets;" and from those who successfully 
complete the six years' course appointments shall hereafter be made as it is necessary 
to fill vacancies in the lower grades of the line and engineer corps of the Navy 
and of the Marine Corps: And provided further, That no greater number of appoint- 
ments into these grades shall be made each year than shall equal the number of 
vacancies which has occurred in the same grades during the preceding year ; such 
appointments to be made from the graduates of the year at the conclusion of their six 
years' course, in the order of merit, as determined by the academic board of the 
Naval Academy ; the assignment to the various corps to be made by the Secretary 
of the Navy upon the recommendation of the academic board. But nothing herein 
contained shall reduce the number of appointments from such graduates below ten 
in each year, nor deprive of such appointment any graduate who may complete the 
six years' course during the year eighteen hundred and eighty-two. And if there be 
a surplus of graduates, those who do not receive such appointment shall be given 
a certificate of graduation, an honorable discharge, and one year's sea-pay, as now 
provided by law for cadet-midshipmen ; and so much of section fifteen hundred and 
twenty-one of the Revised Statutes as is inconsistent herewith is hereby repealed. 

That any cadet whose position in his class entitles him to be retained in the service 
may, upon his own application, be honorably discharged at the end of four years' 
course at the Naval Academy, with a proper certificate of graduation. 

That the Secretary of the Navy may prescribe a special course of study and train- 
ing at home or abroad for any naval cadet. 

That the pay of naval cadets shall be that now allowed by law to cadet-midship- 
men; and as much of the money hereby appropriated as may be necessary during 
the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and eighty-three, shall be 
expended for that purpose. 

That the active list of the medical corps of the Navy shall hereafter consist of 
fifteen medical directors, fifteen medical inspectors, fifty surgeons, and ninety assist- 
ant and passed assistant surgeons. 

That the active-list of the pay corps of the Navy shall hereafter consist of thirteen 
pay-directors, thirteen pay-inspectors, forty paymasters, twenty passed assistant 
paymasters, and ten assistant paymasters. 

That the active-list of the engineer corps of the Navy shall hereafter consist often 
chief engineers with the relative rank of captain, fifteen chief engineers with the 
relative rank of commander, forty-five chief engineers with the relative rank of 
lieutenant-commander or lieutenant, sixty passed assistant engineers, and forty 
assistant engineers, with the relative rank for each as now fixed by law ; and after 
the number of officers in the said grades shall be reduced as above provided, the 
number in each grade shall not exceed the reduced number which is fixed by the pro- 
visions of this act for the several grades. 

That no officer now in the service shall be reduced in rank or deprived of his com- 
mission by reason of any provision of this act reducing the number of officers in the 
several staff corps: Provided, That no further appointments of cadet-engineers shall 
be made by the Secretary of the Navy under section three of the act of eighteen 
hundred and seventy-four. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 217 

That as vacancies shall occur in any of the grades of the medical, pay, and engineer 
corps of The Navy, no promotion shall be made to till the same until the number in 
said grade shall be* reduced below the number which is fixed by the provisions of this 
act for such grade. 

For pay of the retired-list, namely: For forty-two rear-admirals, twenty commo- 
dores, twelve captains, ten commanders, fifteen lieutenant-commanders, eight lieu- 
tenants, eleven masters, rive ensigns, two midshipmen, twenty-two medical directors, 
two medical inspectors, two surgeons, five passed assistant surgeons, seven assistant 
Mirgeons, nine pay-directors, two pay-inspectors, three paymasters, two passed assist- 
ant paymasters, one assistant paymaster, nine chief engineers, nineteen passed assist- 
ant engineers, twenry-live assistant engineers, nine chaplains, seven professors of 
mathematics, three naval constructors, ten boatswains, five gunners, thirteen. car- 
penters, and ten sailmakeis: in all, six hundred and ninety-seven thousand nine 
hundred and twenty-five dollars. Hereafter only one-half of the vacancies in the 
various grades in the line of the Navy shall be filled by promotion until such grades 
shall be reduced to the following numbers, namely: rear admirals, six; commodores, 
ten; captains, forty-five: commanders, eighty-five; lieutenant commanders, seventy- 
four: lieutenants, Wo hundred and fifty; masters, seventy -five; ensigns, seventy- 
fire: and thereafter promotions to all vacancies shall be made but not to increase 
either of said grades above the numbers aforesaid. Hereafter there shall be no promo- 
tion or increase of pay in the retired-list of the Navy but the rank and pay of officers 
on the retired-list shall be the same that they are when such officers shall be retired: 
And provided further, That whenever on an inquiry had pursuant to law, concerning 
the fitness of an officer of the Navy for promotion, it shall appear that such officer is 
unfit to perform at sea the duties of the place to which it is proposed to promote him, 
by reason of drunkenness, or from any cause arising from his own misconduct, and 
having been informed of and heard upon the charges against him, he shall not be 
placed on the retired-list of the Navy, and if the finding of the board be approved by 
the President, he shall be discharged with not more than one year's pay. 

* * * And officers of the Navy traveling abroad under orders hereafter issued 
shall travel by the most direct route, the occasion and necessity for such order to be 
certified by the officer issuing the same; and shall receive, in lieu of the mileage now 
allowed by law, only their actual and reasonable expenses, certified under their own 
signatures and approved by the Secretary of the Navy ; and for the payment of any 
such officers as may be in service, either upon the active or retired-list, during the 
year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and eighty-three, in excess of the num- 
bers of each class provided for in this act, and for any increase of pay arising from 
different duty, as the needs of the service may require, three hundred thousand dollars. 
And all officers of the Navy shall be credited with the actual time they may have served 
as officers or enlisted men in the regular or volunteer Army or Navy, or both, and shall 
receive all the benefits of such actual service in all respects in the same manner as if 
all said service had been continuous and in the regular Navy : Provided, That nothing 
in this clause shall be so construed as to authorize any change in the dates of commis- 
sion or in the relative rank of such officers. And should the sums appropriated for 
the pay of the officers on the active and retired lists of the Navy be insufficient, then 
and in that case the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to use any and all 
balances which may be due or become due to "pay of the Navy," from the other 
bureaus of the department, for that purpose. 

******* 

BUREAU OF ORDNANCE. 

* * The words " ordnance" and " gunpowder" in section thirty-seven hun- 
dred and twenty-one of the Revised Statutes shall be construed to mean offensive and 
defensive arms, ammunition, and explosives, the apparatus for their military use, and 
the materials for producing the whole, and also transportation, necessary information 
concerning them, and whatever is requisite in military experiments with them. 

For the civil establishment at navy-yards and stations, eighteen thousand nine 
hundred and fifty-three dollars and twelve cents : Provided, That if the Secretary of 
the Navy shall find that work at all the navy-yards now maintained cannot be carried 
on during the current fiscal year with advantage to the service and economy to the 
Government for the amounts in this act appropriated for the maintenance of and 
civil establishment at the navy-yards, he shall not make any deficiency for these 
purposes, but he shall suspend work at those yards where he finds it can best be dis- 
pensed with, and shall close such yards and transfer all perishable property and 
stores therefrom to other yards for use therein, and report the facts and. the reasons 
governing his action to the next session of Congress; and at the yards so closed only 
such officers and employees shall be retained as are necessary to preserve and take 
care of the property of the Government, and all other persons shall be transferred or 
discharged: Provided further, That the navy-yard at Washington, District of Colum- 



218 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

bia, may, at the discretion of the Secretary of the Navy, be maintained as a manu- 
facturing yard for the Bureaus of Equipment and Recruiting and Ordnance, and that 
work may be continued in the ropewalk in the Boston navy-yard: And provided 
further, That nothing herein shall be held to interfere with the permanent improve- 
ment of any navy-yard as now authorized by law, or the expenditure for such pur- 
pose of any money appropriated by Congress therefor. 

That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to 
ascertain on what terms can be had such additional lands and water front contiguous 
to the Norfolk navy -yard as are deemed necessary for the construction of a wet-dock, 
and such other works as are demanded for the sufficient capacity and efficiency of that 
yard ; and that he report the result of such negotiations to the next session of Con- 
gress. 

That the Secretary of the Navy shall appoint a commission, to consist of three 
persons, one of whom shall be appointed from the line officers and one from the staff 
officers of the Navy , and one from civil life, which commission shall consider and 
report to the next session of Congress upon the question whether it is advisable to 
sell any of the navy-yards, and, if so, which; and as to each of said yards said com- 
mission shall report as to its cost, its area, its present value, including in separate 
items the value of the land, structures, machinery, and other personal property; the 
depth of water at the yard, and whether it remains and will remain at such depth, or 
will require expense to keep open its water communication ; its condition as to 
being in working order or otherwise; the condition and value of its "plant" in 
the different departments; its advantages and disadvantages as a naval station, 
and for the construction of vessels; its probable value for other purposes, in case 
the yard is discontinued; whether there is any demand for the yard for mercantile 
or other purposes; whether it can probably be sold, and at what price, in case of dis- 
continuance ; the annual cost during each of the past fifteen years of maintaining 
it; the value of what it has produced during each of said years, so far as it can be 
ascertained; its value or necessity for purposes of defense on that part of the coast 
where it is situated, or in general, and also as regards any city in its vicinity; and 
any other facts which such commission may deem useful or advisable to report in 
regard to this question. 

BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY. 

* * •# * * # * 

For the naval-hospital fund, namely : For maintenance of the naval hospitals at 
the various navy-yards and stations, thirty thousand dollars. And if the Secretary 
of the Navy shall not be able to maintain properly the whole number of naval hos- 
pitals now kept open, on the amounts hereby appropriated for the maintenance of 
and civil establishment at naval hospitals, he shall close those which are least 
necessary to the service, and provide for the patients now cared for therein at such 
other naval hospitals as may be most convenient. 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR. 

For preservation and completion of vessels on the stocks and in ordinary ; * * * one 
million seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars : Provided, That no part of this sum 
shall be applied to the repairs of any wooden ship when the estimated cost of such 
repairs shall exceed thirty per centum of the estimated cost of a new ship of the same 
size and like material : Provided, Nothing herein contained shall deprive the Sec- 
retary of the authority to order repairs of ships damaged in foreign waters or on the 
high seas, so far as may be necessary to bring them home. Any portion of said sum 
not required for the purposes aforesaid may be applied toward the construction of 
two steam cruising vessels of war, which are hereby authorized, at a total cost, when 
fully completed, not to exceed the amount estimated by the late Naval Advisory Board 
for such vessels, the same to be constructed of steel, of domestic manufacture, having 
as near as may be a tensile strength of not less than sixty thousand pounds to the 
square inch, and a ductility in eight inches of not less than twenty-five per centum; 
said vessels to be provided with lull sail-power and full steam-power. One of said 
vessels shall be of not less than five thousand nor more than six thousand tons dis- 
placement, and shall have the highest attainable speed, and shall be adapted to be 
armed with not more than four breech-loading rifled cannon, of high power, of not 
less than eight-inch caliber, or two of ten-inch caliber, and not more than twenty- 
one breech-loading rifled cannon, of high power, of not less than six-inch caliber ; 
one of said vessels shall be of not less than four thousand three hundred nor more 
than four thousand seven hundred tons displacement, and shall have the highest 
attainable speed, and shall be adapted to be armed with four breech-loading rifled 
cannon, of high power, of not less than eight-inch caliber, or two of ten-inch caliber, 
and not more than fifteen breech-loading rifled cannon, of high power, of not less than 
six-inch caliber. The Secretary of the Navy is hereby empowered and directed to 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 219 

Organize ;i board of naval officers and experts for his advice and assistance, to be 
called the ''Naval Advisory Board," to serve during the period required for the con- 
struction, armament, a id trial of the vessels hereby authorized to be constructed, 
and no longer. Said b'jard shall consist of live officers on the active list of the Navy 
in the line and the statf, to be detailed by the Secretary of the Navy, without refer- 
ence to rank and with reference only to character, experience, knowledge, and skill, 
and two persons of established reputation and standing, as experts in naval or marine 
construction, to be selected from civil life, and employed for this sole duty by the 
Secretary of the Navy, and to be paid such sum, out of the appropriation hereby 
made, not exceeding eleven thousand dollars, as he may direct: Provided, however, 
That no person shall be a member of said board who has any interest, direct or indi- 
rect, in any invention, device, or process, patented or otherwise, to be used in the 
construction of said vessels, their engines, boilers, or armament, nor in any contract 
for the same. It shail be the duty of said board to advise and assist the Secretary of 
the Navy, in his office or elsewhere, in all matters referred to them by him relative 
to the designs, models, plans, specifications, and contracts for said vessels in all their 
parts, and relative to the materials to be used therein and to the construction thereof, 
and especially relative to the harmonious adjustment, respectively, of their hulls, 
machinery, and armament : and they shall examine all materials to be used in said 
vessels, and inspect the work on the same as it progresses, and have general super- 
vision thereof, under the direction of said Secretary. But said board shall have no 
power to make or enter into any contract, nor to direct or control any officer of the 
Navy, the chief of any bureau of the Navy, or any contractor. Neither of the vessels 
hereby authorized to be built shall be contracted for or commenced until full and 
complete detail drawings and specifications thereof, in all its parts, including the 
hull, engines, and boilers, shall have been provided or adopted by the Navy Depart- 
ment, and shall have been approved, in writing, by said board, or by a majority of 
the members thereof, and by the Secretary of the Navy; and after said drawings 
and specifications have been provided, adopted, and approved as aforesaid, and the 
work has been commenced or a contract made for it, they shall not be changed in any 
respect, when the cost of such change shall in the construction exceed five hundred 
dollars, except upon the approval of said board, or a majority of the members thereof, 
in writing, and upon the written order of the Secretary of the Navy; and, if changes 
are thus made, the actual cost thereof and the damage caused thereby shall be ascer- 
tained, estimated, and determined by said board ; and. in any contract made pursuant 
to this act it shall be provided in the terms thereof that the contractor shall be bound 
by the determination of said board, or a majority thereof, as to the amount of the 
increased or diminished compensation said contractor shall be entitled to receive, if 
any, in consequence of such change or changes. The Secretary of the Navy is hereby 
authorized to cause the said cruising vessels of war aforesaid to be provided with 
interior deflective steel armor, if the same, upon full investigation, shall seem to be 
practicable and desirable, and if the same shall be approved by said board, or a 
majority thereof, in writing. Before any of the vessels hereby authorized shall be 
contracted for or commenced the Secretary of the Navy shall, by proper public adver- 
tisement and notice, invite all engineers and mechanics of established reputation, 
and all reputable manufacturers of vessels, steam-engines, boilers, and ordnance, 
having or controlling regular establishments, and being engaged in the business, all 
officers of the Navy, and especially all naval constructors, steam-engineers, and ord- 
nance officers of the Navy, having plans, models, or designs of any vessels of the 
classes hereby authorized, or of any part thereof, within any given period not less 
than sixty days, to submit the same to said board; and it shall be the duty of said 
board to carefully and fully examine the same and to hear any proper explanation 
thereof, and to report to the Secretary of the Navy, in writing, whether, in their 
opinion, any such plan, model, or design, or any suggestion therein, is worthy of 
adoption in the construction of said vessels, their engines, boilers, or armament; and 
if in such construction any such plan, model, design, or suggestion shall be adopted, 
for the use of which -any citizen not an officer of the Navy would have a just claim 
for compensation, the contractor shall bind himself to discharge the Government from 
all liability on account of such adoption and use : Provided, That said Naval Advisory 
Board herein provided for shall, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, 
prepare plans, drawings, and specifications for vessels, their machinery, and arma- 
ment, recommended by the late Naval Advisory Board not herein authorized to be 
built. 

For the civil establishment, twenty thousand and fifty-two dollars and eighty- 
seven cents. 

BUREAU OF STEAM-EXGIXEERING. 

For repairs, completion, and preservation of machinery and boilers in vessels on 
the stocks and in ordinary ; * * * one million six hundred thousand dollars : 
Provided, That no part of said sum shall be applied to the repair of engines and 



220 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

machinery of wooden ships where the estimated cost of such repair shall exceed 
thirty per cent, of the estimated cost of new engines and machinery of the same 
character and power. That four hundred thousand dollars of the above amount, or 
so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be applied by the Secretary of the Navy 
to the following objects, namely: Under the Bureau of Construction and Eepair: 
To building and fitting the turrets and pilot-house of the iron-clad steamer Mianto- 
nomoh ; and to the launching to the best advantage with such necessary attachments 
and appliances as will render redocking of the ships, unnecessary, of the iron-clad 
steamers Monadnock, Puritan, Ampkitrite, and Terror ; and that no further steps 
shall be taken or contracts entered into or approved for the repairs or completion of 
any of the four iron-clads aforesaid until the further order of Congress ; and the Naval 
Advisory Board, created by this act, is directed to report to the Secretary of the Navy 
in detail by the first day of December, eighteen hundred and eighty-two, as to the 
wisdom and expediency of undertaking and completing the engines, armor, and 
armaments of said iron-clads, and whether any changes in the original plan or plans 
should be made, together with the cost of the completion of each according to the 
plans recommended, if the completion of any of them is recommended ; and the said 
Secretary shall transmit said report to Congress at its next session with his recom- 
mendation thereon, and that any part of the appropriation for said bureau not used 
as above specified may be applied toward the construction of engines and machinery 
of the two new cruising vessels provided for in this act. * * * 

Sec. 2. That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Navy, as soon as may be 
after the passage of this act, to cause an account to be taken of the stock of stores 
and supplies pertaining and belonging to the several bureaus of the Navy Depart- 
ment, in which account shall be stated the original cost of each article and the date 
of purchase, so far as the same is known, and cause an appraisement of the present 
value of such stores and supplies to be made and entered in such account; and said 
appraised value, when so entered, shall hereafter be the price at which they shall be 
charged in accounting with the several bureaus. Such appraisal shall be made by 
boards of officers of the Navy to be designated by the Secretary; and all such stores 
and supplies as shall be found by boards of appraisers to be unserviceable for use in 
the Navy, shall be condemned and sold in the manner hereinafter provided for the 
sale of old materials, and the proceeds thereof, after deducting the cost of such 
appraisal, condemnation, and sale, shall be paid, into the Treasury. And no old 
material of the Navy shall hereafter be sold or exchanged by the Secretary of the 
Navy, or by any officer of the Navy, which can be profitably used by reworking or 
otherwise in the construction or repair of vessels, their machinery, armor, armament, 
or equipment; but the same shall be stored and preserved for future use. And when 
any such old material cannot be profitably used as aforesaid, the same shall be ap- 
praised and sold at public auction after public notice and advertisement shall have 
been given according to law under such rules and regulations and in such manner as 
the said Secretary may direct. The net proceeds arising from the sales of such old 
materials shall be paid into the Treasury. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of 
the Navy annually to report in detail to Congress, in his annual report, the proceeds 
of all sales of materials, stores, and supplies, made under the provisions of this act, 
and the expenses attending such sales. It shall also be the duty of the Secretary of 
the Navy, as soon as may be after the passage of this act, to cause to be examined by 
competent boards of officers of the Navy, to be designated by him for that duty, all 
vessels belonging to the Navy not in actual service at sea, and vessels at sea as soon ■ 
as practicable after they shall return to the United States, and hereafter all vessels 
on their return from foreign stations, and all vessels in the United States as often as 
once in three years, when practicable ; and said boards shall ascertain and report to 
the Secretary of the Navy, in writing, which of said vessels are unfit for further serv- 
ice, or, if the same are unfinished in any navy-yard, those which cannot be finished 
without great and disproportionate expense, and shall in such report state fully the 
grounds and reasons for their orunion. And it shall be the duty of the Secretary of 
the Navy, if he shall concur in opinion with said report, to strike the name of such 
vessel or vessels from the Navy Eegister and report the same to Congress. 

Sec. 3. No officer of the Navy whose pay is appropriated for in this bill shall be 
employed on any shore duty after October first, eighteen hundred and eighty-two, 
unless the Secretary of the Navy shall determine that the employment of an officer 
on such duty is required by the public interests, and shall so state in the order of 
employment, and also the duration of such service, beyond which time it shall not 
continue. 

Approved, August 5, 1882. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 221 

Order. 

August 14, 1882. 
The Navy Department and offices connected therewith in Washington will he closed 
at 3 o'clock p. m. from the 15th of August to the 15th of September, 1882. 

J. G. WALKER, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular. 

October 7, 1882. 

Access to the records and information of each Bureau should ordinarily be freely 
given, without formality, to the other Rureaus and their officers and clerks. If access 
to records, or information deemed confidential by the Chief of the Rureau containing 
them, is sought, such access may be refused until the question is submitted to the 
Secretary and considered and decided. 

Information which might possibly be confidential should only be asked for by the 
Chief of the Rureau, and not by any subordinate; and should be requested from the 
Chief of the Rureau holding its possession, and not from any subordinate. 

Good judgment and good nature will be likely always to determine any differences, 
without raising questions for the decision of the Secretary. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 301. 

October 21, 1882. 

Extended trials in the service having demonstrated the advantages and superiority 
of the Very System of Night Signals, they are adopted for use in the Navy. 

The following Auxiliary Signals and Rules will be inserted in the U. S. Naval Signal 
Rook, namely: 

DANGER OR DISTRESS: A red star, made and repeated as a" call," ivithout a rocket. 

TELEGRAPHIC SIGNAL : Indicated by a bracketed pair of stars followed by a rocket, 
immediately after the "message call" has been answered. 

GEOGRAPHICAL SIGNAL: Indicated by two (2) rockets in succession, followed by 
the signal. 

RULE XL — In making signals for time, latitude, and longitude, when the minutes 
are less than ten (10), the zero must be made before the unit. 

RULE XII. — All exploded caps must be driven out as soon as practicable after 
firing. 

That paragraph on Plate III, U. S. Naval Signal Rook, which directs that a gun 
and rocket shall be used to indicate danger, is annulled. 

Hereafter the Coston lights will not be used for signaling. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



•General Order, No. 302. 

December 12, 1882. 

The attention of commanding and other officers is called to the act of Congress, 
approved August 5, 1882, which provides that vacancies in the lower grades of the 
Line, Engineer Corps, and Marine Corps shall hereafter be filled by appointments to 
be made from the graduates of the Naval Academy, at the conclusion of their six 
years' course, and in the order of merit as shall be determined by the Academic Roard 
of the Naval Academy. 

The above applies to all naval cadets who have not completed the prescribed six 
years' course of instruction. 

In order that naval cadets who have completed the four years' course of study at 
the Naval Academy shall have equal opportunities to prepare for their final exami- 
nation, it is ordered that those who have been doing duty as cadet engineers shall, 
in addition to those duties, be assigned to deck and division duties, and shall be 
given every opportunity to acquire a knowledge of navigation, gunnery, and sea- 
manship, as well as of steam engineering; and that those who have been doing duty 
as cadet midshipmen shall, in addition to those duties, be given the duties in the fire 
and engine-rooms hitherto performed by cadet engineers. 

All naval cadets will, at the end of their six years' course, be finally examined at 
the Naval Academy by the Academic Roard. 

The duty performed by each naval cadet shall be specified in the column of 
•" Remarks," already provided on the Quarterly Returns called for by General Order 
No. 290. 



222 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

Commanding officers of naval vessels are charged with the execution of this order, 
which affects naval cadets who appear as cadet midshipmen on pages 25, 26, and 27, 
Navy Register of July 1, 1882, beginning with and junior to John L. Schock; and 
those who are designated cadet engineers on pages 39 and 40 of the same Register, 
beginning with and junior to Jay M. Whitham. 

Commanding officers are directed to inform the Department of the date of the 
receipt of this order. 

The attention of commanding officers is also called to paragraph 143, page 51, and 
paragraphs 3, 4, and 5, page 65, Navy Regulations, edition of 1876. These Regula- 
tions will be strictly enforced. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 303. 

December 12, 1882. 
Hereafter, fleet officers will not be appointed to a squadron or station unless there 
shall be six or more cruising vessels attached to such squadron or station, and the 
number of enlisted men shall exceed six hundred. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Official Notice. * 

February 2, 1883. 
The President will receive the officers of the Navy and Marine Corps in the District 
of Columbia, and the ladies of their families, at the Executive mansion on Tuesday, 
the 6th inst., from 9 until 11 o'clock p. m. 

Officers are requested to appear in special full-dress uniform. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 304. 

March 10, 1883. 
In the pay table of the Navy Register for January, 1883, the pay of naval cadets is 
not fully and correctly stated. The annual rate of pay allowed to naval cadets per 
act of August 5, 1882, is that which was formerly allowed by law to cadet midship- 
men, viz., after leaving the Academy, at sea in other than practice ships, nine hun- 
dred and fifty dollars; on shore duty, five hundred dollars; and on leave or waiting 
orders, five hundred dollars. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. 

March 23, 1883. 
The Department confirms its telegram to you of the 20th inst., which was in the 
following words : 

" Continue the present eight hours of labor until otherwise ordered.' 7 
The hours of labor should be from 8 to 12 m. and from 1 to 5 o'clock p. m. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Nary. 
To the Yards. 



Circular. 

March 31, 1883. 

Continue to pay wages according to present schedules until further orders. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To the Yards. 



General Order, No. 305. 

March 31, 1883. 
By the act of Congress making appropriations for the naval service, and for other 
purposes, approved March 3, 1883, the title of the grade of master is changed to that 
of lieutenant, the masters now on the list to constitute a junior grade of, and be 
commissioned as, lieutenants, having the same rank and pay as now provided by law 
for masters; and the title of the grade of midshipman is changed to that of ensign, 
the midshipmen now on the list to constitute a junior grade of, and be commissioned 
as, ensigns, having the same rank and pay as now provided by law for midshipmen. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 223 

The officers designated by this act as lieutenants and ensigns will be hereafter 
recognized accordingly, but until further promotion their uniform will remain the 
same as required by existing regulations. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of -the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 33. 

June 4, 1883. 

Coasters' Harbor Island having been ceded and conveyed to the United States by 
the State of Rhode Island, the naval training-station at that place is hereby perma- 
nently established. 

The training system, including the station and training-ships, will be under the 
immediate supervision of the Rureau of Equipment and Recruiting, and official cor- 
respondence with the Navy Department, in connection therewith, will be forwarded 
through that Rureau. 

The commanding officer of the station will superintend all improvements and work 
at the station, submitting with his approval all necessary requisitions. He will also 
have command of the cruising training-ships. 

A suitable vessel will remain permanently at the station for the training of boys. 
Cruising training-ships will be commissioned by the Department, as may be neces- 
sary, and they will cruise at sea not less than eight months in each year, during one 
of which months they may cruise together as a squadron. 

The routine of studies and training will be so arranged that a sufficient number of 
boys will be ready at all times for transfer to men-of-war cruisers when they may be 
put in commission. 

The boys will be under training not less than ten months, and if at the end of 
twenty months they are not qualified for transfer to a cruising vessel, they may be 
discharged from the service. 

As the law authorizes the enlistment of 750 boys annually, that number will, as 
far as practical, be kept under training. 

No apprentices, nor any of the personnel attached to the institution, shall be 
quartered on shore. 

All general orders and circulars, or portions thereof, which conflict with the fore- 
going, are hereby rescinded. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 34. 

June 16, 1883. 
When diplomatic representatives of the United States of the rank of and above 
that of charge d'affaires visit naval vessels, the " union jack" shall be worn in the 
bows of the boats in which they take passage. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 306. 

June 23, 1883. 
When naval cadets are detailed to perform the duties of clerks to commanding 
officers the term of duty shall not continue longer than three months in any one 
year. 

All officers detailed as clerks shall be required to keep watch during the time that 
their ships are cruising. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



No. 307. 

July 5, 1883. 

Naval officers attached to cruising war-vessels, especially commanding officers, are 
expected to leave their families at their usual or fixed places of abode, and not to 
attempt to transfer them to more convenient visiting points. Officers disregarding 
this injunction will be liable to be relieved from duty. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



224 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 308. 

July 16, 1883. 
The regulations for the uniforms of officers of the United States Navy, bearing 
date January 22, 1883, will not go into effect until the Department so orders. 

EDWARD T. NICHOLS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



Cll CULA"l No. 23. 

October 11, 1883. 
Hereafter all requests for surveys on the hull, spars, boats, furniture, machinery, 
or equipments of vessels of the Navy in commission, lying at navy yards, must be 
submitted to the appropriate Bureau before the survey is ordered : except in cases of 
emergency, when the survey may be ordered by the commandant. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 309. 

October 15, 1883. 
All communications to the Navy Department from officers of the Navy, excepting 
only such as relate strictly to the specific duties of the various Bureaus, as defined 
in General Order No. 293, dated March 30, 1882, will be addressed to the Secretary of 
the Navy. 

General Order No. 278, dated November 28, 1881, and all orders or regulations con- 
flicting with this order are hereby rescinded. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular Letter. 

October 16, 1883. 
Sir: You will please furnish, as soon after the 16th of November, 1883, as possible, 
the information asked for herein, to be made up for that day, viz: 

I. List of the commissioned or warranted officers of the Navy, Marine Corps, on 
shore duty at your station, including receiving-ships and tugs and Navy pay officers, 
giving name and rank, with a memorandum of the duty on which they are severally 
engaged. 

II. Statement of the number of petty officers and enlisted men of the Navy and 
Marine Corps at the station. 

III. List of all the civil employes, including foremen, and all persons not ordinary 
mechanics or workingmen, at the station, given consecutively, in order of bureaus, 
with name, occupation, compensation, and appropriation from which each is paid, 
and their pay for one day. 

IV. Statement of the number of all other persons employed at the station, in order 
of the bureaus, classified, and with the title of the pay-roll for the day in each clas3. 

You will also furnish a concise, specific statement of all the work being performed 
at the station on or for vessels-of-war. 
In furnishing the above information you will be guided by the inclosed forms. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
To Commandants of Navy Yards. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 35. 

October 23, 1883. 

Paragraph 8, page 147, of the Navy Regulations of 1876, is amended so as to read 
as follows: 

They may deliver articles to vessels in commission upon requisitions, if not in excess 
of the allowance, signed by the commanding officer of the vessel and approved by the 
senior officer present in command of such vessels and by the commandant of the navy 
yard. When in excess of the allowance, the requisitions must be submitted to the 
appropriate Bureau for its approval, unless in cases of emergency, under which latter 
circumstance the issues may be made and the necessity therefor reported by the com- 
mandant promptly to the Bureau. 

Requisitions for medical supplies must be approved by the Bureau of Medicine and 
Surgery, unless to supply some article for which there is immediate demand. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 225 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 36. 

Relative to the ('.rumination of candidates for appointment as Assistant Naval Constructors, 
in addition to those provided for by sections 1403 and 1522 of the Revised Statutes. 

October 29, 1883. 

Any person desiring to appear before the Board for examination must furnish the 
Department with favorable testimonials or certificates received from the person from 
whom he learned his profession, or from naval constructors under whom he may- 
have served in a navy yard, both as to professional qualifications and moral character. 

Should the testimonials be satisfactory to the Department, the candidate will 
receive permission to appear before the Board of Examiners. 

Candidates must not be less than 24 nor more than 30 years of age ; must be free 
from physical defects, and must have passed an examination before a Board of Naval 
Medical Officers, who will furnish the Board of Examiners with a certificate of the 
physical fitness of each candidate. 

Examinations shall be in writing, but the Board will examine the candidates orally 
on points involved in the written examination, should it be deemed advisable. 

Candidates will be examined in the following subjects : 

1. Testimonials. 

2. Drawing. Satisfactory evidence must be produced of skill in ship-drawing, an 
original design preferred. 

3. Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, plane trigonometry, analytical geometry, differ- 
ential and integral calculus. 

4. Applied mathematics, mechanics, strength of materials, hydraulics and hydro- 
statics. 

5. Physics.— Heat, light, electricity, and magnetism. Chemistry. — General prin- 
ciples and laws, qualitative analysis. 

6. Reading, writing, and speaking French. 

7. Ship-design and calculations. 

8. Descriptive geometry and laying off. 

9. Steam and steam engineering. 
10. Practical ship-building. 

VALUATION OF SUBJECTS. 



No. 1. 20 

No. 2 75 

No. 3 150 

No. 4___ 200 

No. 5 30 

No. 6 25 



Lowest satisfactory, 600. 



500 



Carried forward 500 

No. 7 175 

No. 8 . _. 75 

No. 9 75 

No. 10 175 



Total 1,000 



SCOPE OF EXAMINATION. 



3. Two sets of questions in mathematics will be given, the first embracing ques- 
tions and problems in arithmetic, requiring a knowledge of notation and numera- 
tion, tables of money, weights, and measures in common use, both English and 
French; the relation between them; properties of numbers, arithmetical analysis; 
examples in percentage and interest ; extraction of square and cube roots ; a knowl- 
edge of algebra, including quadratic equations, arithmetical and geometrical pro- 
gressions, the binomial theorem, logarithmic series, the properties of logarithms and 
problems involving the use of logarithmic tables. 

Plane geometry. — Definitions, propositions, and problems. 

Plane trigonometry. — Measurement of angles by degrees, and circular measure ; expla- 
nation of and problems involving trigonometric ratios and formulas ; the solution of 
triangles. 

The second set of questions will embrace analytical geometry. Explanation of 
co-ordinates, rectangular and polar, and the transformation of co-ordinates ; the 
derivation and use of equations of the straight line and the conic sections ; properties 
of the general equation of the second degree. 

Differential calculus. — Differentials of simple and complex algebraic and transcen- 
dental functions, maxima and minima of functions of a single variable, simple curve 
tracing, tangents, and asymptotes, Maclaurin's Theorem. 

Integral calculus. — The ordinary methods of integration and their application to 
finding lengths of curves; the areas, surfaces, and the volumes of solids; centers of 
gravity and moments of inertia. , 

15 



226 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

4. Two sets of questions will be set upon the subjects included under this head, 
mainly consisting of definitions and practical problems. 

The first set will include statics ; composition and resolution of forces acting upon 
a particle; the parallelogram of forces, couples, and moments ; parallel forces, centers 
of gravity, ordinary statical examples, laws of friction. 

Dynamics. — Laws of motion, time of vibration of the simple and the compound oscil- 
lating pendulum, laws of impact, equation of work. 

Statics of structures ; the determination of stress on bars of simple frames and 
trusses, analytically and graphically. Theory of machines, teeth of wheels. 

The second set of questions will include hydrostatics and hydraulics; fluid trans- 
mission of pressure, total pressure, and centers of pressure. 

Bernoulli's Theorem: Flow through orifices, fluid friction on surfaces and in pipes, 
losses of head, action of jets on fixed and moving surfaces, the jet propeller, the 
action of paddles, centrifugal pumps and turbines, the action of the screw-propeller. 

Strength of materials; definition of strength, elasticity, changes of form under 
stress. Kooke's law, modulus of elasticity, strength of a thin hollow sphere and cyl- 
inder, strength and flexure of loaded beams, strength of shafts under torsion, resist- 
ance to impact and repeated stresses. 

5. Physics. — Specific gravity, elasticity of gases, Boyle's law, pressure of the atmos- 
phere, barometers. 

Heat. — Expansion of solids, liquids, gases and vapors, thermometers, changes of 
state of matter, latent heat and specific heat, absorption and radiation, mechanical 
equivalent of heat. Light, reflection and refraction, lenses and prisms, theory of 
simple optical instruments. 

Magnetism. — Magnets, terrestrial magnetism, magnetic elements, variation of the 
needle, laws of magnetic attraction and repulsion. Deviation of the compass pro- 
duced by permanent magnetism of ships, classification of this deviation and method 
of compensation, effect of soft iron in vicinity of the compass. 

Electricity. — Frictional electricity, electrical units of quantity, induction, the action 
of condensers, capacity, simple machines, batteries, measurement of currents, elec- 
trical units, effects of currents, electro-dynamics, attraction and repulson of currents, 
&c, magneto-electricity. , 

7. SHIP DESIGN AND CALCULATIONS. 

Derivation and use of rules for determining areas and volumes ; their application to 
polar co-ordinates. 

Definition of terms, and derivation and use of formulas for determining displace- 
ment, center of buoyancy, center of gravity, metacenter, tons per inch of immersion, 
tonnage, statical and dynamical stability of ships, the conditions of equilibrium, 
metacentric heights", explanation of stiffness and steadiness. 

Effect on stability of change of position of weights, moment to trim ship one inch 
or heel her one degree. Effect on stability of grounding or docking. Curves of sta- 
bility, their calculation, features of same and how influenced by form and dimensions 
of ships. Rudders and steering of ships. 

Explanation of dynamical stability, and its relation to the area, the center of effort, 
and distribution of sails. 

Candidates who show a knowledge of oscillations of ships in still water and among 
waves, and the theory of waves, will be examined thereon, and the paper will be 
given an increased weight accordingly. 

8. DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY. 

Problems and propositions in orthographic projections of lines, to find angles and 
distances between straight lines, problems involving the intersection of lines and 
planes, the intersection of planes with surfaces, the intersection of surfaces generated 
by straight lines, and the development of surfaces. 

LAYING OFF. 

Description of laying down in the mould-loft, fairing, &c, beam-moulds, to lay off 
and level a cant timber, moulds for longitudinals in iron ships, &c. 

9. STEAM AND STEAM ENGINEERING. 

Physical properties of steam, heat required to produce steam of different temper- 
atures, convertibility of heat and work, the advantages of expansion; to obtain I. 
H. P. of an engine from an indicator card, explanation of the features of the card, 
losses of work in the steam-engine, efficiency of the steam-engine theoretically and 
practically. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



227 



Combustion of coal, its calorific value, the amount of air required for perfect com- 
bustion. Outline sketches of the various types of marine engines, their usual weights, 
&c, typos of valves, practical losses of efficiency in marine engines, the advantages 
of the compound engine, types of marine boilers, and types of screw-propellers. 

10. PRACTICAL SHIP-BUILDING. 

Framing of merchant and war-steamships of different types and sizes, with scant- 
lings and methods of construction; advantages and disadvantages of the different 
types; the development of ship construction and the reason for changes; tonnage 
laws and their effects. 

Work in the building-yard, disposition of work, machinery, tools, and supplies, 
organization of labor, internal structural arrangement of ship, water-tight subdi- 
visions, ventilation aud drainage, strengthening in special cases, calculation of weight 
and center of gravity of the ship, sketches of details of iron ships, methods of secur- 
ing armor, adjustment of ship's blocks, launching ways, &c. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 310. 

November 7, 1883. 
The following Executive Order is published for the information and guidance of 
all concerned. 

EDWARD T. NICHOLS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

, Executive Mansion, 

Washington, D. C, November 5, 1883. 
The pay of the petty officers and enlisted men of the United States Navy, on and 
after the 1st of January, 1884, will be as follows: 



Seamen-gunners 

Chief boatswain's mates 

Boatswain's mates 

Chief gunner's mates 

Gunner's mates 

Chief quartermaster 

Quartermasters 

Cockswains 

Captains of forecastle 

Captains of tops 

Captains of afterguard 

Quarter gunners 

Carpenters' mates __ 

Sailmakers' mates __ 

Machinists, first class 

Machinists, second class 

Machinists, third class 

Blacksmiths 

Armorers 

Captains of hold 

Ship's cooks 

Ship's corporals 

Ship's lamplighters 

Jack of the dust 

Carpenters and caulkers 

Baymen 

Seamen 

Ordinary seamen ^ 

Landsmen 

Boys T 

Ordinary seamen, second class (apprentice 

Apprentices, first class 

Apprentices, second class 

Apprentices, third class 



>> 










o ft 




s 


$34 00 


35 00 


30 00 


35 00 


30 00 


35 00 


30 00 


30 00 


30 00 


30 00 


27 00 


27 00 


40 90 


40 00 


70 00 


60 00 


50 00 


60 00 


45 00 


30 00 


35 00 


28 00 


25 00 


22 00 


25 00 


18 00 


24 00 


19 00 


16 00 


10 00 


15 00 


11 00 


10 00 


9 00 




Firemen, first class 

Firemen, second class 

Coal-heavers 

Apothecaries 

Yeomen, paymasters' 

Yeomen, equipment 

Yeomen, engineer's 

Master-at-arms 

Schoolmasters 

Ship's writers 

Ship's printers 

Ship's tailors 

Ship's barbers 

Painters 

Cabin stewards 

Cabin cooks 

Wardroom stewards 

Wardroom cooks 

Steerage stewards 

Steerage cooks 

Warrant officers' steward 

Warrant officers' cooks 

Steward to commanders-in-chief 

Cooks to commanders-in-chief 

Cockswains to commanders-in-chief 

Steward to commandants, navy yards __ 

Cooks to commandants, navy yards 

Cockswains to commandants, navy yard 

Masters of bands 

Musicians, first class 

Musicians, second class 

Buglers 

Electricians 



35 00 
30 00 
22 00 
60 00 
60 00 
60 00 
60 00 
65 00 
45 00 
45 00 
40 00 
30 00 
30 00 
30 00 
37 00 
32 00 
37 00 
37 00 
25 00 
22 00 
24 00 
20 00 
45 00 
40 00 
35 00 
45 00 
40 00 
35 00 
52 00 

32 00 
30 00 

33 00 
50 00 



CHESTER A. ARTHUR. 



228 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 311. 

November 15, 1883. 
The following corrections of typographical errors in the Executive Order of No- 
vember 5, 1883, promulgated in General Order No. 310, of November 7, 1883, are hereby 
made, viz: The pay of carpenters' mates will read $40.00 instead of $40.90, and the 
pay of wardroom cooks will read $32.00 instead of $37.00. 

EDWARD T. NICHOLS, 

Acting Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 312. 

November 24, 1883. 
On and after January 1, 1884, General Order No. 208, of April 1, 1876, will be super- 
seded, and the pay of the crews of receiving-ships will be regulated by General 
Order No. 310, of the Navy Department, dated November 7, 1883. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 313. 

November 24, 1883. 

The rates of finisher, boiler-maker, engineer's blacksmith, armorer's mate, cooper, 
ship's baker, and second-class painter, being abolished by Executive Order, dated 
November 5, 1883, and promulgated in General Order No. 310, of the Navy Depart- 
ment, dated November 7, 1883, men holding those ratings in the service on December 
31, 1883, will be disposed of as follows, viz: Finishers serving on sea-going or other 
vessels to be rated first-class machinists ; those available on receiving-ships and in 
hospital to be rated second-class machinists. Boiler-makers serving on sea-going or 
other vessels to be rated second-class machinists; those available on receiving-ships 
and in hospitals to be rated third-class machinists. Engineer's blacksmiths and 
ship's blacksmiths serving on sea-going or other vessels to stand a competitive ex- 
amination as to their qualifications to perform general blacksmithing work, and 
those found most capable to be retained as blacksmiths; all others to be discharged 
from the service, giving such as are entitled thereto the same benefits they would 
receive had they served out the full term of enlistment. Armorer's mates, coopers, 
ship's bakers, and second-class painters to be disrated to landsmen, or discharged 
from the service should they so elect. 

The rates of seaman, E.F.,and ordinary seaman, E. F., are also abolished, and on 
and after January 1, 1884, men for the engineer's force will be enlisted as first and 
second-class firemen and coal-heavers. Seamen, E. F., and ordinary seamen, E. F., in 
the service on that date will be rated first and second-class firemen, respectively. 

All men discharged by this order are to be sent to the United States by the first 
public opportunity, if serving abroad, unless they desire their discharge on the 
station. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 314. 

December 1, 1883. 
Speed, turning, and maneuvering trials for vessels of the United States Navy. 

Note. — This is too voluminous an order to put in this book, but can be had by .'application to the Navy De- 
partment. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 37. 

December 18, 1883. 
The Department is informed by the Superintendent of the Naval Academy that the 
majority of the letters given by commanding officers to naval cadets during their 
service afloat are of little assistance to the Academic Board in forming an estimate of 
the aptitude of the cadets for the naval service. Commanding officers will there- 
fore submit to the Department quarterly reports, in duplicate, according to the 
annexed form. 

Blank forms will be supplied by the Department for these reports, which are 
intended to take the place of the letters from commanding and executive officers now 
required by the U. S. Navy Regulations. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 229 

BepoA of Naval Cadets attached to the U. S. S. , Bate, Station, for 

quarter ending , 188 . 

Scale of marks : "Excellent;" "very good;" "good;" "tolerable;" "indifferent;" "bad;" "complete 

failure." 







(No other terms shall be used.) 










Performance of Duties. 


Attention 
to duty. 


Conduct. 


REMARKS. 

(Any remarks 


NAME OF CADET. 


As officer of 
watch, top and 

boat, and as 

mate of deck or 

hull. 


As officer of 
division. 


In engine and 
lire-rooms. 


that may assist 
the Board in 
forming its 
opinion of a 
cadet should be 
placed in this 
column.) 

















Respectfully submitted, 



To the Hon. Secretary of the Navy, 

Washington, D. C. 



Commanding. 



General Order, No. 315. 



The rating of electrician, the 



January 5, 1884. 
pay of which was fixed by Executive Order of 
November 5, 1883, promulgated in General Order No. 310, dated November 7, 1883, 
is hereby abolished. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Notice. 

January 7, 1884. 
In order to facilitate the despatch of the mails by the postmasters, it is desirable 
that the "penalty clause" be stamped on the upper right-hand corner of the envelope, 
as it is now the practice to cancel such stamps. 
By direction of the Secretary of the Navy. JOHN W. HOGG, 

Chief Cleric. 



General Order, No. 316. 

January 14, 1884. 
General Order No. 241, dated February 12, 1879, is hereby rescinded. 
Pay officers of ships and squadrons will render monthly, to each Bureau of the Navy 
Department, abstracts of public bills, with vouchers, in lieu of the quarterly abstracts 
heretofore rendered in accordance with Form 22, page 195, Regulations relating to the 
Pay Department, U. S. Navy. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 317. 

January 22, 1884. 
For the purpose of complying with the rulings of the Postmaster General under 
the several acts relative to the use of penalty envelopes, it is hereby directed that 
all such envelopes used for official correspondence emanating from the Navy Depart- 
ment, branches, or offices thereof, shall bear the words " Navy Department," in addi- 
tion to the name of the Bureau, office or officer, as the case may be, and the penalty 
clause ; and that the penalty clause shall appear on the upper right-hand corner of 
the envelope. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



230 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 318. 

February 19, 1884. 
To facilitate the transmission and delivery of mail matter addressed to persons in 
the naval service, the following information embraced in a communication from the 
Postmaster General to the Secretary of the Navy is promulgated : 

1. Mail matter deliverable in any part of the United States or Canada. 
Letters deliverable in any part of the United States or Canada, addressed to the care of 
the Navy Department, if prepaid one full rate of postage, can be redirected and 
mailed, no additional prepayment of postage being required. In case of only partial 
prepayment the deficient postage is collectible at the post office where the letters are 
finally delivered, or it may be paid with the official stamps of the Navy Department. 
Other mail matter must be fully prepaid. If, however, through inadvertence on the 
part of postal officers, such matter reaches the Navy Department, it may have the 
deficient postage supplied with official stamps and be readdressed and mailed. 

2. Mail matter deliverable abroad within the Postal Union. 

All letters coming to the Navy Department for persons in the naval service, whose 
place of address is in foreign countries tvithin the Postal Union, may be simply redirected 
and deposited in the post office in Washington. To insure their transmission to the 
Navy Department, however, one full rate of domestic postage must be prepaid. On 
arriving at their destination double the deficient postage, allowance being made for 
whatever amount has been paid in this country, will be collected. If full prepay- 
ment, that is to say five cents per half ounce, has been made by the senders of the 
letters, nothing will be collected on final delivery. Navy Department official stamps 
are not valid within the Postal Union. 

Mail matters, other than letters for countries within the Postal Union, must be fully 
prepaid. Such matter addressed to the care of the Navy Department when unpaid, 
or partially prepaid must be sent to the Dead-Letter Office. 

3. Mail matter addressed to persons not within the Postal Union. 

Mail matter addressed to the care of the Navy Department for persons whose place 
of address is within a non-union country, where full payment is not required, may be 
redirected and deposited in the post office ; the deficient postage, if any, can be paid 
by Department stamps or be collected at the place of final delivery. Where full pay- 
ment is required, but not made, the necessary amount of postage must be paid, for 
which the Navy Department stamps may be used, or the matter must be sent to the 
Dead-Letter Office. To insure transmission from the sender to the Navy Department, 
one full domestic rate of postage must be prepaid on letters and full prepayment on 
other matter. 

4. Mail matter addressed to the care of the Navy Department, but properly deliv- 
erable by the U. S. consul at Colon, Panama, or Shanghai, may be redirected, to the 
care of the consul and forwarded through the post office in Washington. The postage 
on such matter should be fully prepaid ; if not by the sender, then the stamps of the 
Navy Department will be receivable for the deficiency. As stated in the two preced- 
ing paragraphs, letters must be prepaid by the sender with one full rate of domestic 
postage to insure transmission to Washington ; other matter must be fully prepaid 
at domestic rates. 

5. Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines' unpaid letters. 

Section 179 of the Postal Laws and Regulations provides : Letters written by non- 
commissioned officers and privates in the military service, or in the naval service 
(embracing the Marine Corps), on which the postage is not prepaid, must be plainly 
marked on the outside, over the address, " Soldier's letter," " Sailor's letter," or " Ma- 
rine's letter " (as the case may be), and this certificate signed, with his official designa- 
tion, by a field, or staff" officer of the regiment to which the soldier belongs, or by the 
officer in command of his detachment or of the post, or by a surgeon or chaplain at a 
hospital. In the Navy or Marine Corps the certificate must be signed by the officer 
in command of the vessel, or by a chaplain or surgeon on board, or by the officer com- 
manding a detachment of marines on shore. All unpaid letters of soldiers, sailors 
or marines, duly certified, must be forwarded to their destination, charged with the 
amounts of postage due at single rates only, to be collected on delivery. 

The Navy Department is endeavoring to facilitate, as far as possible, the trans- 
mission of mail matter to persons in the naval service, and its action in that direction 
has secured the co-operation of the Post Office Department as above indicated. As 
the redirecting of mail matter sent to the care of the Department involves much time 
and attention, to avoid this parties should, when practicable, send their mail mat- 
ter directly to its destination prepaying the full amount of postage required, and not 
send it to the care of the Navy Department, or require it to use its official stamps. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



231 



May 16, 1884. 



Circular No. 24. 

The following signals will be added to the Naval Signal Book : 
6370 — Uniform, .special full-dress. 
6371— Uniform _. full-dress . 
6372 — Uniform ..social full-dress. 
6373 — Uniform ..dress. 
6374 — Uniform, .undress. 
6375 — Uniform, .service-dress. 
6376 — Uniform.. overcoats. 
6377 — Uniform. .white coats. 
6378 — Uniform.. white trousers. 
6379 — Uniform, .helmets. 

In signals prescribing the uniform to be worn, the numbers designating special full- 
dress, full-dress, social full-dress, dress, undress, and service-dress, shall be used when aU 
Hue is to be worn. 

If overcoats, white coats, white trousers, or helmets are to be worn, a second signal shall 
follow. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



To oe pasted on page 472 of the Signal Book. 



6370 


UNIFORM, .special full-dress. 






6371 


Uniform . _ full-dress . 


Wear full-dress. 


3963 


6372 


Uniform- .social fall-dress. 






6373 


Uniform _ _ dres s . 






6374 


Uniform _ .undress . 


Wear undress. 


3964 


6375 


Z7?u/orm__service-dress. 






6376 


Uniform, .overcoats. 






6377 


Uniform.. white coats. 






6378 


Uniform, .white trousers. 






6379 


Uniform. . helmets . 







To oe pasted opposite the word Uniform on page 468, Signal Boole. 



UNIFORM— refer to page 472. 



General Order, No. 319. 

May 19, 1884. 
The closing sentence in paragraph 2 of General Order No. 313, of November 24, 1883, 
should read as follows: Seamen, E. F., ordinary seamen, E. F., and landsmen serving 
in the Engineer's Force, in the service on that date, will be rated first and second-class 
firemen and coal-heavers, respectively. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 320. 



General Order No. 252, issued under date of July 7, 1880, is so far modified that, in 
the future, all boats will be painted white outside. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



232 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



Circular Letter. 

July 9, 1884. 
Commanding officers of navy yards or stations are informed that in no case should 
an officer or employe" in a navy yard or at a station, who cannot be appointed with- 
out the approval of the Chief of the Bureau or the authority of the Department, be 
removed without like approval or authority. 

In any case where the dismissal of any such officer or employe" is believed by the 
commanding officer to be necessary or proper, he will report to the Chief of the proper 
Bureau or to the Department, as the case may be, his reasons for such belief, and 
await instructions ; in the mean time he may, in his discretion, suspend the officer or 
employe referred to in such report. 
Very respectfully, 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy* 
To Commanding Officers of all Yards and Stations. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 38. 

July 10, 1884. 

In order that the Naval Academy records of the physical condition of naval cadets 
may be complete, and that the Board of Medical Officers making the physical exam- 
ination of cadets before final graduation, at the completion of the six years' course, 
may have all necessary information, it is directed that when naval cadets are de- 
tached from sea-going vessels, either by transfer to other vessels, to return to the 
United States, or upon the completion of a cruise, the senior medical officer shall for- 
ward duplicate reports to the Navy Department of the physical condition of the 
naval cadets during their service on board said vessels, and at its termination; also 
a full account of all cases of serious illness or injuries that may have occurred to 
them. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 321. 

August 5, 1884. 

The Navy Department announces to the service the safe arrival at Portsmouth, N. 
H., on the 1st of August, of the Thetis, Bear, and Alert, composing the Arctic Relief 
Squadron, after having successfully accomplished the object of their mission, in the 
rescue of Lieutenant Greely of the Army, and the other survivors of his party. 

The Department extends its cordial and earnest congratulations to Commander 
Schley, commanding the expedition, and to the officers and men of his command, 
upon the distinguished success of their efforts, and takes this occasion of publicly 
commending the courage, zeal, and judgment with which they executed their diffi- 
cult and dangerous duty. 

The names of the officers and men of the vessels of the Relief Squadron form a part 
of this order. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



List of officers attached to the U. S. S. Thetis, 1884. 



Name. 


Rank. 


W. S. Schley 


Commander, commanding Greely Relief Expedition. 


U. Sebree 


E. H. Taunt _ _ 






Lieutenant (junior grade). 
Ensign, on board the S. Loch Gary. 
Ensign. 


W. I. Chambers _ ___ 


C. H. Harlow 


G. W. Melville 


E. H. Green 









GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

List of men attached to the U. S. S. Thetis, 1884. 



233 



Name. 


Rate. 








Yeoman (acting captain of hold and paymaster's yeoman). 
Ship's cook (acting boatswain's mate). 


W. A. Coffin 




E. W. Walker _ 


Boatswain's mate (acting quartermaster). 

Captain of top. 

Captain of top and quartermaster. 










Quartermaster. 
Carpenter's mate. 




Walter Booth 




First-class machinist. 


Adam Stitt 




Third-class machinist (enlisted at St. Johns, N. F., for cruise). 


W. J. Fisher 


William Griffin. 




F. F. Taylor 












Hartley Cook 




F. F. Baggerson 


Seaman. 








Seaman (acting ship's cook). 
Seaman (acting sailmaker's mate). 


Carl Wasdon _ _ _ 


Charles Tong Sing _ 


Max Tvron _ _ _ 




C. Nilson 


Seaman, on board the S. Loch Garry. 
Seaman, on board the S. Loch Garry. 


J. B. Larson 





List of officers attached to the U. S. S. Bear, 1884. 



Name. 



Raxk. 



W. H. Emory, jr t Lieutenant commanding. 

F. H. Crosby Lieutenant. 

J. C. Colweil [ Lieutenant. 

N. R. Usher I Lieutenant. 

L. K. Reynolds Ensign. 

John Lowe Chief engine^. 

H. E. Ames Passed assistant surgeon. 



List of men attached to the U. S. S. Bear, 1884. 



Name. 



Rate. 



F. Ash 

John Quevedo 

Arthur Lloyd 

Hugh Brock 

D. H. Keenan 

James F. Burke 

C. J. Carlson 

J. C. Evans 

Joseph B. Fletcher 

John Roberts 

John Johnson (1) 

John Johnson (2) 

Jacob Johnson 

Albert Jason 

L\ M. Lidrikse 

H. Krusberg 

J. J. Campbell 

John Lindquist 

Fred. Law 

George Savo 

OttoSchwarz 

J. M. Beam . 

Henrv Thomas . 

T. J. Morton 

Archie Currie 

Lewis C. Smith 

James Ro*an ! 



Ice master. 

Boatswain's mate. 

Boatswain's mate. 

Quartermaster. 

Quartermaster. 

Captain of top. 

Captain of top. 

Yeoman. 

Carpenter's mate. 

Seaman. 

Seaman. 

Seaman. 

Seaman. 

Seaman. 

Seaman. 

Seaman. 

Seaman. 

Seaman. 

Ship's cook. 

Cabin steward. 

Cabin cook. 

First-class machinist. 

First-class machinist. 

Blacksmith. 

First-class firemau. 

First-class fireman. 

First-class fireman. 



234 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

List of officers attached to the U. S. S. Alert, 1884. 



Name. 


Rank. 


George W. Coffin __ 








H. J. Hunt. . _ 




C. S. McClain 






Ensign. 

Passed assistant engineer. 

Passed assistant surgeon. 




F. S. Nash 



List of men attached to the U. S. S. Alert, 1884. 



Name. 



Rate. 



David L. Gifford Ice master. 

Joseph Doyle Boatswain's mate. 

Philip Shantz Quartermaster. 

Albert Jones Captain of top. 

Ed. White Carpenter's mate. 

Frank Blokus Seaman. 

P. C. Hansen Seaman. 

John Degen Seaman. 

William Bloom . Seaman. 

Adam Weissel Ship's cook. 

Olaf Anderson Cabin cook. 

M. C. Boi Seaman. 

J. E. Green Machinist. 

William Haas First-class fireman. 

Thomas Wilson First-class fireman. 

John Watts First-class fireman. 

Thomas Bragger Boatswain's mate. 

Sal vat or Tordagoer Quartermaster. 

Charles Anderson Captain of top. 

Thomas Beswetheric Yeoman. 

Christian Guyken Seaman. 

Amund Olsen Seaman. 

J. Lukshewitz Seaman. 

Charles Tristram Seaman. 

Alexander Watson Seaman. 

Herman Lara Seaman. 

W. Wettergren Cabin steward, 

William J. Powell Machinist. 

John Wachter ! First-class fireman. 

John Sullivan * First-class fireman. 

T. S. Roberts I First-class fireman. 

A. H. Kemble j Blacksmith. 

C. Baxter I Seaman. 



Circular No. 25. 

August 20, 1884. 
All British. Colonial armed vessels wearing the British blue ensign and pennant 
(" see Naval Eeserve Flag and Pennant," plate XIV of " Flags of Maritime Nations"), 
with the arms or badges of the respective colonies emblazoned in the field of the 
ensign, will be recognized by commanding officers of vessels of the United States 
Navy as being entitled to the courtesies and privileges of ships-of-war. 

Unarmed vessels in the employment of the government of a colony fly the same 
flag without the pennant. 

All other vessels registered as belonging to one of the British Colonies fly the red 
ensign with the badge of the colony in the center of the flag. 

EARL ENGLISH, 

Actfg Secretary of the Navy. 



August 21, 1884. 
Office Department, 



Circular No. 26. 

A clause in the act making appropriations for the Post 
approved July 5, 1884, repeals section 3915 of the Revised Statutes, which authorized 
the use of official or Department stamps. The Bureaus, stations, &c, and all persons 
in the naval service having on hand such stamps, are hereby directed to return the 
same to the Secretary of the Navy, with a memorandum of the number of each 
denomination so returned. 

EARL ENGLISH, 

Acfg Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 235 

Circular No. 27. 

■ September 8, 1884. 

The following extract from a circular of the Postmaster General, issued on the 4th 
instant, fixing the rates of pay for official communications by telegraph, within the 
United States, until the close of the present fiscal year, is published for the informa- 
tion and guidance of the Navy and the Marine Corps. 

" For day messages of not exceeding twenty (20) words, exclusive of the date, 
twenty (20) cents for distances within one thousand (1,000) miles, with an additional 
charge of five (5) cents for every additional two hundred and fifty miles, or fraction 
thereof, but for no distance is the rate to exceed fifty (50) cents. 

"For night messages of not exceeding twenty (20) words, exclusive of date, fifteen 
(15) cents for all distances below two thousand miles, and for greater distances 
twenty-five (25) cents. 

" For both day and night messages an addition of one-fifth the rate is to be made 
for every five (5) words or fraction thereof in excess of twenty (20) words. 

"Provided, That in no case shall the Government be charged higher rates than the 
public is charged for the same service. 

"In computing distances the shortest practicable route of the company trans- 
mitting the message shall, in all cases, be the basis of computation. 

"The rate for all messages in cipher, known as the Signal Service "Weather 
Eeports, shall not exceed three (3) cents for each word sent over each circuit as now 
or hereafter established by the Chief Signal Officer of the Army. All messages sent 
over a circuit will be dropped at all designated intermediate offices therein without 
additional charge. 

"All officers of the United States should endorse upon official messages transmitted 
by them the words • Official Business,' and should report to the Postmaster General 
any charge in excess of the above rates.' 7 

J. G. WALKER, 

Act' g Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 322. 

October 1, 1884. 

The order of the Department of August 31, 1865, to the Chief of the Bureau of 
Navigation, and that of June 26, 1869, attaching the Office of Detail to that Bureau, 
are hereby revoked. 

All communications to the Department from naval officers will be addressed to the 
Secretary of the Navy, except those strictly pertaining to the special business of the 
Bureaus of the Department as defined in General Order No. 293, dated March 30, 
1882, or in other distinct or special orders, and communications required to be made 

1, 1880. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 323. 

October 1, 1884. 
The attention of officers is called to General Order No. 224, of March 23, 1877, rela- 
tive to application for orders, which is herewith reprinted ; also to the accompany- 
ing extract from the annual report of the Department of November 29, 1882, concern- 
ing "Favoritism in the Navy." 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 224. 

March 23, 1877. 
Application for orders, or revocation of them, shall be made by the officer himself, in an official form, stat- 
ing the precise ground upon which he bases his claim for a change. 

All applications for this purpose made by other than the officer himself will be regarded as exceptional, and 
will be considered only when the circumstances are extraordinary, and the officer so distant as not to be able 
to make an official application within a reasonable time, and where the public interests will not suffer by the 
change. 

The applications will be placed on file and regarded as official. 

E. W. THOMPSON, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Extract from the annual report of the Secretary of the Navy of November 29, 18S2. 

FAVORITISM IS THE NAVT. 

Military administration should be controlled by neither personal, social, or political motives. The orders to 
every naval officer should be determined after, first, a consideration of the public interests, and secondly, an 
mpartial comparison of the record and services of the officer with those of other officers of like grade. If unjust 
orders are issued, the officer can freely state the injustice directly to the Secretary, asking a reconsideration, 
and his representation will have due and candid consideration. The interference of others, if to secure only 



236 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

what is right, is unnecessary; if to accomplish what is wrong, is intolerable. An officer who will procure or 
knowingly allow such undue interference may be charged with unbecoming conduct. Nevertheless, the prac- 
tice has prevailed of soliciting and procuring favoritism for officers by such devices and with such pertinacity 
and influence as to create a system, resistance to which may make unenviable the position of the head of the 
Department. But if it is allowed to continue, the naval service will eventually become fatally demoralized. 
The effort will be made to order the detail of officers of the Navy with as much justice and impartiality as the 
lot of humanity will admit. 



General Order, No. 324. 

October 3, 1884. 
Special attention is called to paragraphs 1, 4, 18, and 33, Chapter XVII, pages 127 
to 131, Navy Regulations, 1876, relative to official correspondence, as follows: 

1. 

1. Communications are to be written in a legible hand, in concise terms, without 
erasures or interlineations, and on one side only of each half-sheet. 

2. If the subject-matter can be completed on one page, and no communications or 
papers are inclosed, a half-sheet only will be used ; but if there are inclosures a whole 
sheet is to be used, and the inclosures placed between the leaves, separately numbered, 
and referred to accordingly. 

3. The paper used will be white foolscap, thirteen and a half by sixteen and a half 
inches, weighing sixteen pounds to the ream, and made of linen stock; to be stop- 
ruled with twenty-four blue lines on the first and third pages only, leaving one inch 
margin back and front, top and bottom. 

4. Signatures are to be distinctly legible, and the writer is to annex his rank or 
rate. The paper is to.be folded twice, parallel with the ruling, indorsed with the 
name and rank of the writer, place or vessel, date, and a brief statement of the 
contents. 

4. 

The dates of all circulars, orders, telegrams, or letters to which reference is made 
in corresponding with the Department, or any of its Bureaus, must be distinctly 
quoted. * * * 

18. 

Should any communication be made to the Secretary of the Navy and, at the same 
time, to the Bureau, the person forwarding such duplicates will state the same in his 
communication. 

33. 

All telegrams of a personal nature, such as applications for detachment, for orders, 
extensions of leave, &c, must be paid for by the parties sending them; telegrams 
sent by officers at Government expense must be as brief as possible. 

Officers of the Navy will, hereafter, in corresponding with the Department, write 
separate letters on separate subjects, unless the subjects are of like nature. The 
practice, for instance, of embodying in the same communication information relating 
to the movements and. condition of a vessel, the assignment or detachment of officers, 
suggestions as to discipline, or the result of a court-martial, produces confusion and 
delay in acting on its subject-matter. 

In acknowledging a communication from the Department, not only the date of such 
communication should be given, but there should also be a brief reference to its 
subject. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 325. 

Octooer 6, 1884. 

A college is hereby established for an advanced course of professional study for 
naval officers, to be known as the Naval War College. It will be under the general 
supervision of the Bureau of Navigation. The principal building on Coasters' Har- 
bor Island, Newport, R. I., will be assigned to its use, and is hereby transferred, with 
the surrounding structures and the grounds immediately adjacent, to the custody and 
control of the Bureau of Navigation for that purpose. 

The college will be under the immediate charge of an officer of the Navy, not below 
the grade of commander, to be known as the President of the Naval War College. 
He will be assisted in the performance of his duties by a faculty. 

A course of instruction, embracing the higher branches of professional study, will 
be arranged by a board, consisting of all the members of the faculty and including 
the president, who will be the presiding officer of the board. The board will have 
regular meetings at least once a month, and at such other times as the president may 
direct, for the transaction of business. The proceedings of the board will be recorded 
in a journal. 

The course of instruction will be open to all officers above the grade of naval cadet. 

Commodore S. B. Luce has been assigned to duty as president of the college. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 237 

U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 39. 

October 6, 1884. 
All officers of the United States Marine Corps who have in charge public funds for 
disbursement will make the following returns to the Paymaster General of the United 
States Navy : 

1. A weekly and monthly statement, showing the amount in hand and the amount 
on deposit, with the name of the depositary, as now required from paymasters of the 
U. S. Navy (Forms I and J, Regulations relating to the Pay Department, U. S. Navy). 

2. A monthly money statement of receipts and expenditures, under the different 
heads of appropriations (Form A, Regulations relating to the Pay Department, U. S. 
Navy). 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 40. 

October 10, 1884. 

From and after December 31, 1884, all officers of the United States Marine Corps 
having charge of public property, on shore or at sea, will make the returns of the 
same to the Chief of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing and to the Chief of the 
Bureau of Ordnance, heretofore required to be made to the Fourth Auditor of the 
Treasury, subject to such changes and in accordance with such regulations and forms 
as may hereafter be established by those Bureaus. 

Until otherwise ordered, Marine officers in charge of public property will render to 
the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing the following returns and vouchers : 

1. Accounts-current of goods for manufacturing rmrposes received and issued. 

2. Accounts-current of clothing received and issued. 

3. Receipt-rolls for regular and extra issues of clothing. 

4. Schedules of public furniture. 

5. Accounts-current of public property received and expended. 

6. Return of clothing, &c, Form No. 11. 

7. Vouchers for all receipts and expenditures of every character, such as invoices, 
receipts, bills, and reports of boards of survey on material, clothing, public property, 
and furniture, except such as are required to be rendered to the Bureau of Ordnance. 

8. Statement of material, supplies, and garments received and paid for by the Quar- 
termaster's Department. 

9. Duplicate vouchers for all purchases and sales under every appropriation of the 
Marine Corps, except ordnance and military stores. 

Marine officers in charge of public property will also render to the Bureau of Ord- 
nance the following returns and vouchers : 

1. Accounts-current of arms, accoutrements, and military stores received and issued. 

2. Reports of boards of survey on arms, accoutrements, and military stores, with 
invoices, receipts, and other vouchers. 

Boards of officers to take inventories of all marine stores and public property will 
be appointed by the commandant of marines, or by commandants of navy yards, if 
necessary, for all stations in the United States, and by commanding officers of vessels 
carrying marine stores, immediately on the receipt of this order. 

Such inventories shall be made in the form of invoices, each of which will embrace 
a list of articles and materials, with cost prices, placed under their appropriate classi- 
fication and heads of appropriation ; the amounts to be compared with the last returns 
made to the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury : and the inventories forwarded to the 
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing of the Navy Department, excepting inventories of 
arms, accoutrements, and military stores, which will be forwarded to the Bureau of 
Ordnance, Navy Department. 

Upon the first returns to the Bureaus the articles embraced in the inventories shall 
be entered under their appropriate heads, and upon each subsequent return the stores 
on hand and the inventory price shall be so entered. 

Hereafter, at the beginning of each fiscal year, or as near thereafter as practicable, 
a board of officers will be appointed to take a complete inventory of the stores and 
other public property in charge of the assistant quartermasters of the Marine Corps 
at Philadelphia, Pa. The inventories must give the prices as well as the amounts of 
all articles on hand. Should there be any discrepancies between the amounts on 
hand and those called for by the books of the office, the fact will be noted and a written 
explanation furnished to the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, or to the Bureau of 
Ordnance, as the case may be. 

These inventories must be made in duplicate and signed by each member of the 
board, the originals to be forwarded to the Bureau concerned, and the duplicates to 
be retained bv the respective officers in charge. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



238 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

General Order, No. 326. 

October 18, 1884. 

On the recommendation of Lieutenant Commander John F. Merry, in command 
of the U. S. S. Tallapoosa at the time of the sinking of that vessel, on the night of 
August 21, 1884, medals of honor are hereby awarded to the following-named per- 
sons — Lieutenant Commander Merry reporting that, while all the officers and men on 
board behaved gallantly, and did their duty as officers and men should, the men named 
came more under his special notice, to wit : 

August Ohmsen, master-at-arms, for clearing the berth-deck, remaining there until 
the water was waist deep, wading about with outstretched arms rousing the men out 
of their hammocks, then going on deck, assisting to lower the first cutter, and then 
the dinghy, which he took charge of. 

David Harrington, first-class fireman, and John W. Magee, second-class fireman, both 
of Avhom remained at their posts of duty in the fire-room until the fires were put out 
by the rising waters ; the former opened the safety-valves when the water was at his 
waist. 

The medals will be prepared as early as practicable, and transmitted to those to 
whom awarded. 

For the information of the Navy, the following list is given of petty officers and 
seamen in the naval service to whom medals of honor have been heretofore awarded, 
but no announcement thereof made in General Orders : 

Henry Williams, carpenter's mate, for going over the stern of the U. S. S. Constitu- 
tion, at sea, February 13, 1879, during a heavy gale, and performing important car- 
penter's work upon herrudder. 

James Horton, captain of top, and Joseph Mattheivs, captain of top, for courageous 
conduct in going over the stern of the U. S. S. Constitution, at sea, February 13, 
1879, during a heavy gale, and cutting the fastenings of the ship's rudder-chains. 

Henry Simpson, first-class fireman, and John Millmore, ordinary seaman, for rescuing 
from drowning John W. Powers, ordinary seaman, serving on the same vessel with 
them, the U. S. S. Essex, at Monrovia, Liberia, October 31, 1877. 

James Thayer, ship's corporal, for rescuing from drowning a boy serving with him 
on the U. S. S. Constitution, at navy yard, Norfolk, Va., November 16, 1879. 

William Johnson, cooper, of the LT. S. S. Adams, for rescuing from drowning Daniel 
W. Kloppen, a workman at the navy yard, Mare Island, Cal., November 14, 1879. 

Thomas Mitchell, landsman, for rescuing from drowning M. F. Caulan, first-class 
boy, serving with him on the U. S. S. Richmond, at Shanghai, China, November 17, 
1879. 

James 0' Conner, landsman, E. F., and William Sweeney , landsman, E. F., for jumping 
overboard from theU. S. S. Jean Sands, opposite the Norfolk navy yard, on the night 
of June 15, 1880, and rescuing from drowning a young girl who had fallen overboard. 

John Russell, seaman, and Philip Moore, seaman, for jumping overboard from the U. 
S. S. Trenton, at Genoa, Italy, September 21, 1880, and rescuing from drowning Hans 
Paulsen, ordinary seaman. 

William, Morse, seaman, and John Smith, seaman, for jumping overboard from the 
U. S. S. Shenandoah, at Rio de Janerio, Brazil, September 19, 1880, and rescuing from 
drowning James Grady, first-class fireman. 

Alexander Turvelin, seaman, and John Davis, ordinary seaman, for jumping over- 
board from the U. S. S. Trenton, at Toulon, France, February, 1881, and rescuing 
from drowning Augustus Ohlensen, coxswain. 

George Low, seaman, for jumping overboard from the IT. S. S. Tennessee, at New 
Orleans, La., February 15, 1881, and sustaining, until picked up by a boat's crew, 
N. P. Petersen, gunner's mate, who had fallen overboard. 

William Hill, captain of top, for jumping overboard from the IT. S. T. S. Minnesota, 
at Newport, R. I., June 25, 1881, and sustaining, until picked up by a steam-launch, 
William Mulcahy, third-class boy, who had fallen overboard. 

William Sadler, captain of top, for jumping overboard from the IT. S. S. Saratoga, 
off Coaster's Harbor Island, R.I., June 25, 1881, and sustaining, until picked up by 
a boat from the ship, Frank Gallagher, second-class boy, who had fallen overboard. 

Adam Weissel, ship's cook, for jumping overboard from the IT. S. T. S. Minnesota, 
at Newport, R. I., August 26, 1881, and sustaining, until picked up by a boat from 
the ship, C. Lorenze, captain of the forecastle, who had fallen overboard. 

Michael Thornton, seaman, for jumping overboard from the IT. S. tug Leyden, near 
Boston, Mass., August 25, 1881, and sustaining, until picked up, Michael Drennan, 
landsman, who had jumped overboard while temporarily iusane. 

Edward Barrett, second-class fireman, said John La verty, first-class fireman, for haul- 
in g the fires from under the boiler, the stop-valve chamber having been ruptured, of 
the IT. S. S. Alaska, at Callao Bay, Peru, September 14, 1881. 

John Morris, corporal, IT. S. M. C., for leaping overboard from the IT. S. Flag-ship 
Lancaster, at Villefranche, France, December 25, 1881, and rescuing from drowning 
Robert Blizzard, ordinary seaman, a prisoner, who jumped overboard. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 239 

Henry J. Manning, quartermaster, and John McCarton, ship's printer, for jumping 
overboard from the U. S. F. S. New Hampshire, off Coasters' Harbor Island, near 
Newport, R. I., January 4, 1882, and endeavoring to rescue Jahez Smith, second-class 
musician, from drowning. 

Francis Moore, boatswain's mate, for jumping overboard from the U. S. T. S. Ports- 
mouth, at the Washington navy yard, January 23, 1882, and endeavoring to rescue 
Thomas Duncan, carpenter and caulker, who had fallen overboard. 

H. C. Courtney, seaman, and T. Cramen, boatswain's mate, for jumping overboard 
from the U. S. T. S. Portsmouth, at the Washington navy yard, February 7, 1882, and 
rescuing from drowning Charles Taliaferro, jack of the dust. 

Jeremiah Troy, chief boatswain's mate, and James F. Sullivan, boatswain's mate, for 
jumping overboard from the U. S. T. S. New Hampshire, at Newport R.I., April 21, 
1882, and rescuing from drowning Francis T. Price, third-class boy. 

Johannes Bouning, ordinary seaman, and Christian Osepius, seaman, for jumping 
overboard from the U. S. tug Fortune, May 7, 1882, at Hampton Roads, Va., and res- 
cuing from drowning James Walters, gunner's mate. 

Louis Williams, captain of top, for jumping overboard from the U. S. S. Lackawanna, 
March 16, 1883, at Honolulu, H. I., and rescuing from drowning Thomas Moran, lands- 
man. 

Matthew Gillick, boatswain's mate, and J. F. Auer, ordinary seaman apprentice, for 
jumping overboard from the U. S. S. Lancaster, November 20, 1883, at Marseilles, 
France, and rescuing from drowning a French lad, who had fallen into the sea from 
a stone pier astern of the ship. 

J. A. Norris, landsman, and Bolert Siveeney, ordinary seaman, of the U. S. S. James- 
town, December 20, 1883, for rescuing from drowning A. A. George, who had fallen 
overboard at the New York navy yard. 

Louis Williams, captain of the hold, and Lsaac L. Fasser, ordinary seaman, of the U. 
S. S. Lackawanna, for rescuing from drowning William Cruise, who had fallen over- 
board, June 13, 1884, at Callao, Peru. 

J. G. WALKER, 
Acting Secretary of the Navy. 



General Order, No. 327. 

November 21, 1884. 

From and after January 1, 1885, the form of honorable discharge from the naval 
service, authorized by section 1427, Revised Statutes of the United States, will be 
the "Honorable Discharge and Continuous-Service Certificate." 

All men (except officers' cooks, stewards, and servants enlisted for special service) 
now serving under enlistments for three years, or who may hereafter enlist for that 
period, shall receive an "Honorable Discharge and Continuous-Service Certificate" 
at the expiration of their terms of enlistment, upon the recommendation of their 
commanding officers. 

Any man holding an "Honorable Discharge and Continuous-Service Certificate" 
who re-enlists for three years, within three months from the date of his last dis- 
charge, shall receive an increase of one dollar per month to the pay prescribed for 
the rating in which he serves, for each consecutive re-enlistment, in addition to the 
"honorable discharge money." 

Any man holding an "Honorable Discharge and Continuous-Service Certificate" 
who fails to re-enlist within three months from date of last discharge, will derive no 
further advantages therefrom. 

The Department directs that the records of conduct and professional qualifications 
on the "Enlistment Records" shall be a verification of the recommendations for 
"Honorable Discharge and Continuous-Service Certificate," and hereafter only those 
shall be recommended who obtain, during their terms of enlistment, a general 
average of four. 

In order that commanding officers of vessels upon which men complete their terms 
of enlistment shall be informed as to the previous merit of said men, the original 
"Enlistment Record" (Form 12), which accompanies an enlisted man upon his first 
transfer, will hereafter be carefully preserved and accompany him upon all subse- 
quent transfers, until his term of enlistment has been completed. This form has 
been amended so as to show the record of conduct as averaged by the commanding 
officer of the vessel for the period for which the man has served under his command. 
The final averages will be made by the officer under whom the man is serving at the 
time his enlistment expires, when about to be discharged. These "Enlistment 
Records" must be forwarded to the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting. 

In addition to the above requirements, enlisted men must serve at least two years 
and nine months of their terms of enlistment in order to receive an " Honorable Dis- 
charge and Continuous-Service Certificate," except in extraordinary cases, which will 
be provided for by the Department as they may occur. 



240 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

When any man holding an " Honorable Discharge and Continuous-Service Certifi- 
cate" shall fail to receive a recommendation for its renewal upon the expiration of 
his term of enlistment, the words "not entitled to Honorable Discharge" shall be 
written on the line below the last entry. Men so discharged will receive no further 
pecuniary benefit from their "Honorable Discharge and Continuous-Service Certifi- 
cate," and entries of re-enlistment or subsequent service must not be noted thereon. 

"Good-Conduct Badges" are special distinctions for fidelity, zeal, and obedience, 
and will not be granted for the first term of enlistment under "Continuous Service." 
At the expiration of subsequent re-enlistments for three years, within three months 
from date of discharge, men who hold "Honorable Discharges and Continuous-Serv- 
ice Certificates," have obtained a general average of four and five-tenths (4.5) on 
their "Conduct Records," and are recommended by their commanding officers, will 
be entitled to and receive said badges. The first badge will be a medal, as hitherto. 
Subsequent badges to be clasps, with the name of the vessel from which given 
engraved thereon, to be worn on ribbon above medal. When any enlisted man shall 
have received three such badges, under consecutive re-enlistments as above, he shall 
be enlisted as a petty officer in the rating in which he is best qualified to serve, and 
shall continue to hold a petty officer's rating during subsequent continuous re-enlist- 
ments, and shall not be reduced to a lower rating except by sentence of court-martiaL 

Paragraphs 18 and 20, page 100, and paragraph 22, page 101, U. S. Navy Regula- 
tions, are hereby annulled. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 
- - — - Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 328. 

December 1, 1881. 

Commanding officers of naval vessels visiting the port of New York are directed 
to anchor within the limits shown on the copy of the chart of New York Harbor by 
the horizontal shading lines, and described in the following paragraphs, viz : 

1. Anchorage in East Elver. — In addition to the present anchorage in the Wallabout, 
which will be continued in use as formerly, naval vessels may anchor on the New 
York side of the East River, between 16th and 31th streets, and as close in as possi- 
ble without obstructing the mouths of slips, so as to leave room for one vessel to pass 
along shore between them and the wharves. 

2. Anchorage in North River. — Naval vessels may anchor in North River above a line 
connecting Castle Point, New Jersey, with the grain elevator at West 70th street, 
New York, except in the space west of the center line of the river between 35th and 
79th streets. Experience indicates this anchorage to be in general the most con- 
venient one in New York waters for naval vessels not lying at the navy yard. 

3. Anchorage in Upper Bay.— >N aval vessels may anchor in Upper Bay as close to the 
shoals on either hand as their draught will permit, and to the south of a line joining 
the southern point of Bedloe's Island and the southern point of Governors Island. 
The eastern portion of this anchorage will be limited in the Buttermilk Channel by 
a line joining Red Hook with the southern point of Governor's Island, and may 
include Gowanus Bay, Yellow Hook Channel, and the adjacent shoals* 

4. Naval vessels will not anchor in any other than the above-described localities, 
except in case of distress or necessity, and in such cases will shift berth to one of 
these localities as soon as possible. 

In all localities, vessels will avoid anchoring so as to obstruct or impede ferry-boats. 

WM. E. CHANDLER > 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular No. 28. 

December 12, 1884. 

Officers ordered to duty under the Light-House Board will report by letter to the 
Secretary of the Treasury. 

While on this service they will obey the orders and directions of the Secretary of 
the Treasury, the Chairman of the Light-House Board, and the Naval Secretary of 
the Board. 

In case of the absence of the latter, his duties are performed by the Engineer Sec- 
retary. 

All directions from these officers are issued in the name of the Board, and will be 
obeyed as coming from that body. 

While engaged on duty under the Light-House Board, officers will be held directly 
responsible to the Navy Department for conformity to the rules and articles for the 
government of the Navy, and the Navy Regulations, except only so far as they may 
be inconsistent with the special service being performed. 

They will also be held directly responsible for the care of the lives, vessels, and 
public property that may be placed under their control. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Nary. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 241 

Circular NO, 20. December 12, 1884. 

Officers ordered to duty under the Fish Commission will report by letter to the 
Commissioner. 

While on this service they will obey the orders and directions of the Commissioner. 

In case of his absence or disability his duties devolve by law upon an assistant, 
whom he has authority to designate, and whose directions under such circumstances 
are to be obeyed. 

While engaged on duty under the Fish Commission officers will be held directly 
responsible to the Navy Department for conformity to the rules and articles for the 
government of the Navy, and the Navy Regulations, except only so far as they may 
be inconsistent with the special service being performed. 

They will also be held directly responsible for the care of the lives, vessels, and 
public property that may be placed under their control. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular No. 30. December 12, 1884. 

Officers ordered to duty under the Coast and Geodetic Survey are to report by letter 
to the Superintendent. 

While on this service they are to obey the orders and directions of the Secretary of 
the Treasury and of the Superintendent of the Survey. 

By direction of the Superintendent the Hydrographic Inspector is charged with 
certain details of hydrograx>hy, repairs of vessels, and other incidental matters. 

His directions in these matters are to be obeyed. 

While engaged on duty under the Coast and Geodetic Survey officers will be held 
directly responsible to the Navy Department for conformity to the rules and articles 
for the government of the Navy, and the Navy Regulations, except only so far as they 
may be inconsistent with the special service being performed. 

They will also be held directly responsible for the care of the lives, vessels, and 
public property that may be placed under their control. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 329. December 27, 1884. 

After December 31, 1884, until action by Congress, there will be no current appro- 
priations for the pay of the Navy, for pay miscellaneous, for contingent expenses of 
the Navy, for the work of the Bureaus of the Department, for the Naval Academy 
Marine Corps, or Naval Asylum. The naval service must therefore be lawfully main- 
tained without such appropriations. All the officers and seamen of the Navy will 
continue to perform their respective duties under existing orders, and their pav and 
emoluments will constitute lawful debts of the Government. All necessary contracts 
and purchases, for clothing, subsistence, forage, fuel, quarters, and transportation 
for the current year, will be duly made, and vouchers will be issued therefor, but the 
holders must be informed that payments will depend upon future appropriations for 
the purpose. 

Employes for whose payment, after December 31, no appropriations may apply, 
will be allowed to continue on duty where the work in which they are engaged is 
in the opinion of the Department or its proper representatives, necessary to meet a 
sudden emergency which may involve the loss of human life or the destruction of 
property, provided they will stipulate that they work voluntarily and without con- 
tract or agreement that they shall be paid therefor; and in such cases they will be 
given certificates stating the time and character of the services, and that they were 
voluntarily rendered without contract or agreement, and that the holders will have 
no claim for compensation unless Congress shall make an appropriation therefor. 

No services of employes not appropriated for will be accepted after December 31 
except under the foregoing conditions. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Circular. December 30, 1884. 

The officers of .the Navy and Marine Corps will assemble at the Navy Department 
at 11.30 o'clock a. m. on Thursday, January 1, 1885, in special full-dress uniform, to 
pay their respects, at 12 o'clock, to the President of the United States. 

They will form in the Navy Department, under the direction of the senior officer 
present, and proceed in a body to the Executive Mansion. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

General Order, No. 330. December 31, 1884. 

The following Executive Order is published for the information and guidance of 
all concerned. WM. E. CHANDLER, 

16 Secretary of the Naay. 



242 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



Executive Mansion, December 31, 1884. 
The Executive Order of November 5, 1883, is hereby modified as follows : 
The ratings of 1st, 2d, and 3d class machinist are abolished, and hereafter there 
will be one rating of machinist in the Navy, with the pay of $70.00 a month. 
New ratings are hereby established as follows : 



EATING. 


Monthly 
pay. 




$60 00 
38 00 






36 00 




36 00 









CHESTER A. ARTHUR. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 41. January 8, 1885. 

The following classification of petty officers and enlisted men in the Navy, and of 
non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates in the Marine Corps, is hereby 
adopted. WM. E. CHANDLER, 

— Secretary of the Navy. 

CLASSIFICATION. 





Seaman Class. . 


Special Class. 


Artificer Class. 


Marines. 




S °= 

X Eh 
Ei m 

EH rH 
H 


Chief Boatswain's Mates. 
Chief Quartermasters. 
Chief Gunner's Mates. 






Sergeant Majors. 
1st Sergeants. 


1 * 

_i-3 

- 2 ° 
ft ha 

t| 


Equipment Yeomen. 
Apothecaries. 
Paymaster's Yeomen. 
Engineer's Yeomen. 
Ship's Writers. 
School Masters. 
Band Masters. 


Machinists. 


K . 
W 00 

M CO 

O » 

Ah I 


Boatswain's Mates. 
Quartermasters. 
Gunner's Mates. 
Coxswains to Commander-in- 
Chief. 


Ship's Corporals. 
Ship's Cooks. 
Chief Musicians. 


Boilermakers. 
Armorers. 
Carpenter's Mates. 
Blacksmiths. 
Sailmaker's Mates. 
Water Tenders. 


Sergeants. 


1 ^ 

H 

i-3 

tO 1-3 

O * 

- 2 ° 
I £g 

GO 3 

J-J 


f f 
£ y ' 

s < J 

O o 

Eh CO 

Eh 

H 


Captains of Forecastle. 
Captains of Main Top. 
Captains of Fore Top. 
Captains of Mizzen Top. 
Captains of Afterguard. 
Coxswains. 
Quarter-Gunners. 
Seamen-Gunners. 


Captains of Hold. 


Printers. 
Painters. 
Oilers. 


Corporals. 


1 ^ 

K 

CO i-3 

- 2 © 

> *l 

GO Hi 

co o 

' M 

W 




Seamen. 

Seamen- Apprentices, 1st class. 


Lamplighters. 

Jacks-of-the-Dust. 

Buglers. 

Musicians, 1st class. 

Tailors. 

Barbers. 


Firemen, 1st class. 

Carpenters. 

Calkers. 


Musicians. 
Orderlies. 


"2? 

}-gfc 

1 es 


r 

S ^ ] 

QQtN 


Ordinary Seamen. 

Seamen- Apprentices, 2d class. 


Bay men. 
Musicians. 


Firemen, 2d class. 


Privates. 


oo j^ 


s"8 [ 


Landsmen. 

Apprentices, 1st class. 
Apprentices, 2d class. 
Apprentices, 3d class. 
Boys. 


» 


Coal Heavers. 




J II 



Mess-men 
Stewards, cooks, and attendants. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 243 

Circular No. 31. 

January 13, 1885. 

On and after March 1, 1885, meteorological observations on board of all U. S. naval 
vessels, for International Simultaneous Meteorological Bulletins, will be made at 4 a. 
m., 12 m.,and 8 p. m., Greenwich mean time, instead of at 4.08 a. in., 12.08 p.m., and 
8.08 p. m., as heretofore. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Circular No. 32. 

January 13, 1885. 

Navy Department Circular No. 16, dated May 12, 1880, is hereby revoked, and the 
following substituted therefor: 

Commanding officers of cruising ships may, upon the recommendation of a board 
of officers, advance any lst-class apprentice to the rating of seaman-apprentice 2d 
class at any time after the expiration of the first year of the cruise. Any seaman- 
apprentice 2d class may be advanced to the rating of seaman-apprentice 1st class 
after the expiration of the second year of the cruise, provided he possesses, in the 
opinion of the board, the necessary physical as well as professional qualifications of 
a seaman. These ratings may be made without regard to the complement of the ves- 
sel. Seaman-apprentices 1st class may be advanced to the rating of petty officers 
when vacancies exist if, in the opinion of the board, they possess such exceptional 
qualifications for the rating as warrant such advancement. 

Apprentices holding the rating of ordinary seaman 2d class will be rated seaman- 
apprentice 2d class on Januarv 1, 1885. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 
Secretary of the Navy. . 

REGULATIONS REGARDING CORRESPONDENCE AND RECORDS. 

With the view of initiating and maintaining a system which will be as nearly 
uniform as practicable throughout the Department, its Bureaus and offices, the fol- 
lowing regulations, which embrace the essential features of the recommendations of 
the board appointed to examine into the methods prevailing of conducting corre- 
spondence and making up permanent records, are adopted, and will be carried into 
effect not later than February 1st : 

OPENING COMMUNICATIONS. 

1. All official communications for the Secretary of the Navy will be opened by the 
Chief Clerk of the Department, unless the Secretary directs otherwise; those for a 
Bureau by the chief thereof, or assistant appointed under authority of law, or by the 
chief clerk of the Bureau as the chief may direct ; those for the head of an office by 
such head or other person in his office whom he may designate. 

2 They will then be stamped, briefed, endorsed, and numbered in the manner here- 
inafter indicated, and returned for the action of the Secretary, the Chief of the Bureau, 
or head of the office, as the case may be. 

FOLDING, STAMPING, AND BRIEFING. 

3. Before stamping and briefing they will be folded when practicable to a uniform 
size, taking as a standard an ordinary size letter sheet folded from bottom to top in 
three equal parts. Foolscap will be folded in four equal parts, and note paper will 
be opened full and treated as a half sheet of letter paper. 

4. The first or upper fold will be reserved exclusively for office marks, briefing 
contents, noting enclosures, and for other necessary memoranda. When communi- 
cations are so fully written as to leave no blank space for such marks, &c, or where 
they cannot be folded to the proper size, a half sheet of letter paper will be fastened 
thereto and so folded. Loose wrappers with endorsements or official marks are not to 
be placed around or on such communications ; but if they have been so placed by 
those sending them, such wrappers will be fastened firmly thereto. 

5. The receiving stamp will be impressed across the upper part of the first fold; 
the stamp in all offices to be similar in design, and showing the office, date, and year 
of receipt, with a space on the left for other entries. About one and. ^lie-half inch 
space will be reserved on the first or upper fold for this stamp, so as not to obscure it 
should the communication ultimately be bound. 

6. When there are enclosures, the letter of transmittal will be stamped across the 
first fold after the brief with an enclosure stamp. Each enclosure will be folded in 
the same manner as the letter, stamped by the receiver across the top with a stamp 
prepared for that purpose, and, as a rule, briefed. The folding and briefing should 
be done by the sender if connected with the Navy or Navy Department. 



244 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

BRIEFING. 

7. When a proper brief has not been made by the writer, one will be made by the 
receiver under the receiving-stamp, showing the date of the communication, locality 
of the writer, his name and official title, if any, and the subject-matter of the com- 
munication. No communication properly briefed should be again briefed in the same 
or any other office upon any other fold of the paper; nor should any addition be 
made to a brief except to correct errors or supply omissions. Eeports or letters, as 
well as copies subsequently received, in connection with the original communication, 
should, as a rule, be briefed. 

INDEXING. 

8. After stamping and briefing a communication it will be indexed and a file num- 
ber given it; also the alphabetical letter of a briefing record indicated. The index 
should be alphabetically arranged, and may be tagged, for the more important 
branches of the service, " Department, "Bureaus," &c. 

If advisable, the alphabetical arrangement may be extended to the letter following 
the initial one, as Ab, Ac, Ad, &c. 

The index entry will show the name of the writer, or of the Department, Bureau, 
or office, the person or subject written of, the index number, and the letter of the 
briefing record. 

There should be two or more entries under diiferent heads in the index whenever 
the subject requires it. Where subsequent communications are received on the same 
subject from the same party, or other parties, they may be given the same file num- 
ber as the initiatory communication ; or a new number, if preferred, proper reference 
being made to the initiatory one. 

BRIEFING RECORD. 

9. Communications will be successively entered upon the record, which should 
have printed headings and be appropriately ruled according to their file or index 
numbers. 

10. LTnder the column of action all references and other essential memoranda will 
be made, including the date of any answer and the volume and page of permanent 
records of such answer. 

11. When a communication reaches the briefing record bearing a file number out 
of the regular order, it will be recorded in its turn, making the record number the 
same as the file number; and in this case, or that of a subsequent similar entry, the 
page of the record where it will be found should be noted in red ink under the first 
or original entry bearing this file number. 

REFERRING PAPERS. 

12. Reference from the Secretary's Office to the Bureaus or others of letters will be 
made by endorsement and signature substantially as follows : 

" Respectfully referred to . [State purpose.] 

"By direction of the Secretary of the Navy. 



"Chief Cleric." 

unless the Secretary should himself make the same ; and from the Bureaus to the 
Secretary's Office or other Bureaus by endorsement and signature, as follows: 
"Respectfully referred to [State purpose.] 



"Chief of ike Bureau." 

The fact of such reference will be noted on the briefing record. These endorsements 
should not be made on the first or briefing fold. 

13. Letters referred by the Department to a Bureau may be answered by the 
Bureau directly to the writer in appropriate cases, and the business disposed of. In 
other cases the necessary data upon which the Department can frame an answer 
will be endorsed on the letter, referred, and returned (unless request is made to draw 
up the answer), or upon a separate sheet transmitted therewith, authenticated by 
the signature of the chief, and in the latter case the fact of such memorandum having 
been transmitted will be noted on the original. 

14. When the subject-matter comes entirely under the cognizance of the Bureau or 
office to which a communication has been referred, and returned therefrom Avith report, 
and is answered by the Department, the press-copy of such answer (after being fully 
recorded) will be returned, with the original communication, to the Bureau or office 
to be permanently filed there, and note thereof properly made on the brieting record. 

15. When the reference mark is made simply by stamping or writing the name or 
initials of the Bureau or office at the bottom of the upper fold it indicates that the 
paper is not to be returned to the Department, but is for the action of, and file in, the 
Bureau. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



245 



MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS. 

16. When enclosures are transmitted and not described in the body of the original, 
a brief reference will be made to them at the bottom thereof. 

17. Correspondence between the Bureaus and between them and the Navy Depart- 
ment should, whenever convenient, expeditious, and proper, be conducted by endorse- 
ment upon the papers pertaining to the case under consideration. Lengthy cord 
respondence and reports may be conducted by letter or on an additional sheet marked 
enclosure, and a note of the fact made beneath the last endorsement on the first fold. 

18. Rolls, requisitions, invoices, and other papers of a similar nature in routine- 
work can be filed in the most convenient manner, as the business of the office may 
require. They will not be accompanied by a letter of transmittal fas they are com- 
plete in themselves when properly dated, signed, and authenticated by the sender,) 
unless they are of such a character that a letter of explanation is necessary and a 
record of such transmission might be important. They should be stamped and 
indexed, but need not be given a file number nor entered on the briefing record. 

19. Requests, inquiries, directions, or information, of an oft-recurring nature, should 
be made and given as far as possible upon printed, numbered forms; and the record 
of such should not embrace the printed matter. 

20. Full copies of all the papers in a case need not be made when partial copies or 
extracts covering the particular events involved will answer the purpose. 

21. Copies of papers should be written on both sides of the paper used, unless the 
matter is to be printed or the copies are made Avith the type-writer. Written origi- 
nals intended for press-copying, or those made with the type-writer, should be on one 
side only. 

22. Whenever a pa^jer is withdrawn from the file for office use, a file check showing 
its number, etc., and by whom withdrawn, should be left in its place. 

23. In answering letters the file number of the letter answered should be placed in 
the upper left-hand corner of the answer, so that an impression of it will appear on 
the press-copy; and the press-copy, after being recorded, filed with the letter to which 
it is an answer. This same number should be entered upon the margin of the book 
where the answer is recorded. Letters " sent" should be indexed in a similar manner 
to letters "received." 

24. Endorsements by superior officers, forwarding communications from those under 
their command, will be made upon the face of the communication or somewhere after 
the signature of the writer, and not upon the fold reserved for stamping and briefing. 

25. When correspondence originates in an office the letter sent will receive a num- 
ber the same as if it were a "letter received," in order that it may be entered upon 
the record, and appear as the initial number of that particular subject of communi- 
cation. 

26. The designs of stamps suggested by the board and the forms of indexes and 
records are approved, subject to such minor changes as may be considered preferable 
for use in the Bureau or office. The following are illustrations of stamping and 
briefing : 



Receiving Stamp. 



File No. 


NAVY DEPARTMENT, 
SECRETARY'S OFFICE. 
RECEIVED JAN. 


1885. 


Record No. 


Stanq) showing number of enclosures. 


Number. 


Enclosures. ^J 2 r 



Stamp for enclosure. 



NAVY DEPARTMENT. 

No. of the 

Enclosure. 



1885. 



246 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

First or upper fold. 



Space of one inch and a half for 
Receiving Stamp. 



NEW YORK, 

January 20, 1885. 



u. s. s 



Anderson, John S., 

■Lieutenant, U. S. N. 



ALLOTMENT. 



Asking permission to increase to $_ 
per month. 



Space of one inch and a half for 
Receiving Stamp. 



January 20, 1885. 
NEW YORK NAVY YARD, 



Commandant. 



PILOTAGE. 



Enclosing letter from Commander of 
the Saratoga, with bills for pilotage. 



Three enclosures 



WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 
Navy Department, 

Washington, January 14, 1885. 

General Order, No. 331. 

January 26, 1885. 
The following joint resolution, approved January 6, 1885, is published for the infor- 
mation of all concerned : 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

JOINT RESOLUTION providing for the payment of laborers in Government employ for certain holidays. 

Resolved by the Senate and Mouse of Representatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled, That the employees of the Navy Yard, Government Printing Office, 
Bureau of Printing and Engraving, and all other per diem employees of the Govern- 
ment on duty at Washington, or elsewhere in the United States, shall be allowed the 
following holidays, to wit : The first day of January, the twenty-second day of Feb- 
ruary, the fourth day of July, the twenty-fifth day of December, and such days as 
may be designated by the President as days for national thanksgiving, and shall 
receive the same pay as on other days. 

Approved, January 6, 1885. 



Circular. 

February 2, 1885. 

Payments under the following items in the act making additional appropriations 
for the naval service for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1885, approved January 30, 
1885, will, from January 1, 1885, be charged under the appropriation "Pay Miscel- 
laneous" viz : 

" For rent and furniture of buildings and offices not in navy yards; expenses of 
courts-martial and courts of inquiry, boards of investigation, examining boards, with 
clerks' and witnesses' fees, and traveling expenses and costs ; stationery and record- 
ing ; expenses of purchasing-paymasters' offices at the various cities, including clerks, 
furniture, fuel, stationery, and incidental expenses; newspapers and advertising; 
foreign postage ; telegraphing, foreign and domestic ; telephones ; copying ; care of 
library ; mail and express wagons, and livery and express fees ; costs of suits ; com- 
missions, warrants, diplomas, and discharges; relief of vessels in distress, and pilot- 
age; recovery of valuables from shipwrecks ; quarantine expenses; care and trans- 
portation of the dead; reports, professional investigation, cost of special instruction, 
and information from abroad, and the collection and classification thereof." 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 247 

General Order, No. 332. 

February 7, 1885. 

All petitions, remonstrances, memorials, and communications from any officer or 
officers of the Navy or Marine Corps, whether on the retired or active list, addressed 
to Congress, or either House, or to any committee of Congress, or to any member of 
Congress, on any subject of legislation, pending, proposed, or suggested, will be for- 
warded through the Navy Department, and not otherwise, except by authority of 
the Department : and no officer will appear before any committee of Congress except 
by such authority. 

A strict compliance with this order will be required. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



U. S. Navy Regulation Circular, No. 42. 

February 12, 1885. 
The accompanying letter of the Second Comptroller of the Treasury, dated January 
27, 1885, together with nine (9) forms for vouchers reported by him under section 273 
of the Revised Statutes, to be used in disbursing the public moneys of the Navy- 
Department, is published for the information of all persons concerned. 

The various Bureaus of the Department will be guided by these forms in preparing 
blanks for vouchers, and adopt them for use in ordinary cases. 

WM. E. CHANDLER, 

Secretary of the Navy. 

Letter of the Second Comptroller accompanying official forms for disbursing the public money 

in the Navy Department. 
Treasury Department, Second Comptroller's Office, 

Washington, D. C, January 27, 1885. 
Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 16th instant 
returning proposed forms of vouchers in which you do me the honor to say, "the 
Chiefs of Bureaus express their willingness, for the sake of uniformity in the trans- 
action of public business, to accept the proposed forms and adopt them in the 
Bureaus," and I herewith respectfully report to you the enclosed eight official forms 
to be issued in the different offices for disbursing the public money in the Navy De- 
partment, namely: 

Form No. 1, entitled " Contract Voucher." 
Form No. 2, entitled " Open Purchase Requisition." 
Form No. 3, entitled " Open Purchase Voucher." 
Form No. 4, entitled " Open Purchase Requisition" for ships. 
.Form No. 5, entitled " Open Purchase Voucher" for ships. 
Form No. 6, entitled " Open Contract Requisition for services." 
Form No. 7, entitled " Open Contract Voucher for services," and 
Form No. 8, entitled " Voucher for Reservations on Contracts." 
These forms are substantially the same as the proposed forms returned by you on 
the 16th instant. 

With a view to the preparation of the safest possible forms of vouchers, as proposed 
by you on the 12th of July last, I had the honor, by your invitation of that date, to 
confer with the Chiefs of Bureaus of your Department, and having received much 
valuable information and many important suggestions on the subject at that confer- 
ence, I thereupon prepared the proposed forms above referred to, and submitted them 
to your Department on the 12th day of August last, with a request for such further 
advice from the Chiefs of Bureaus as an examination of the proposed forms should 
suggest. 

I respectfully tender to each of the Chiefs of Bureaus my acknowledgments for 
valuable assistance in the attempt to render the forms as nearly pefect as possible, 
and I trust the forms may afford the desired protection to the public, to disbursing 
officers, to officers required to act on disbursing officers' accounts, and to parties 
whose rights may be based on the vouchers ; and it is hoped they will prove to be 
reasonably convenient in transacting the public business. 

In making this report I respectfully invite attention to three different requisites 
that are of special importance in securing the primary evidence necessary to make 
the voucher a perfect protection. 

The requisites specially important are the following: 

1. That it appear affirmatively on the voucher that the property was purchased or 
the services employed under a written contract duly made and filed, or in pursuance 
of an order issued by an officer having authority. 



248 GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 

2. That it appear on the voucher that the property purchased has been received by 
an officer whose duty it was to receive it, and who is lawfully chargeable with its 
custody or distribution. 

3. In all cases where the legality of a purchase without advertisement and a public 
opening of bids depends upon the existence of a public exigency requiring immediate 
delivery, it is essential that it appear on the voucher or accompanying papers that 
a decision was lawfully made on that point before the property was purchased. 
Otherwise the question will remain open, to be established by proof of the facts and 
circumstances until the question shall be settled by the accounting officers or in court. 

The first of these points is too obvious to need remark, and I understand it to be 
universally conceded. 

On the second point, it appears to me equally obvious that the best evidence upon 
which to charge an officer with the custody of property is his own receipt, showing 
when, where, and in what capacity he received it. I should not deem it necessary to 
comment on this point, were it not that a form of voucher has been used, to some 
extent, which contains only a certificate of a clerk (afterwards approved by an officer), 
stating merely that " the above articles have been received,'" without stating when, 
where, or by whom they were received. 

* On the third point, I am compelled to admit, it has been seriously claimed that a 
decision made by a Bureau officer of the Navy Department, after the goods are pur- 
chased, to the effect " that the public exigency required the immediate delivery of 
the articles, and they were therefore purchased in open market," is of the same force 
as a decision made before the purchase, that si*ch decision, certified in the above 
form, is in the nature of record evidence, and dispenses with the necessity of pro- 
ducing the original decision or any other proof of the exigency. 

This view ignores an important jurisdictional distinction. It holds a decision or 
attempted decision made when the officer no longer has jurisdiction to order the pur- 
chase, and no longer has power to decide how the purchase shall be made, to be of 
the same weight as a decision made when the subject was before him for his official 
determination. 

When it becomes the duty of an officer to order a purchase, it necessarily becomes 
his duty to decide whether the public exigency requires immediate delivery, but it is 
neither the duty nor within the power of an officer of the Navy to make a conclusive 
decision of the matter after the purchase is made. 

It is well settled that a decision made by an officer (no matter how limited his 
jurisdiction) at a time when the discharge of his official duties necessarily includes 
making the decision, is conclusive until it is reversed or set aside by some competent 
authority : and it is equally well settled that a decision or an attempted decision 
made by an officer when the subject is not before him for decision is not conclusive. 

After goods have been purchased and the purchase has been reported to a Bureau 
of the Navy Department, there is no longer occasion for the exercise of discretion as 
to the propriety or necessity of purchasing by open contract; there is no decision of 
an administrative character to be made, and any future decision in regard to the 
existence of an exigency , the legality of th etransaction, or the rights of parties, must 
necessarily be of a judicial or quasi judicial character. 

When the purchase has been made and the property is delivered, the rights of the 
parties, whatever they may then be, are vested, and they cannot afterwards be 
affected by any administrative order, or finally determined until the subject reaches 
the accounting officers or a court. But the decision as to whether the public exi- 
gency requires immediate delivery, made by the proper officer before the property is 
purchased, is the authoritative and lawful exercise of official discretion, and if such 
decision is fairly made, certified, and acted upon before it is overruled or set aside, it 
is final and conclusive of the point decided, and it protects parties acting under it. 

Such exercise of discretion by an officer, at a time when it is his duty to exercise 
it, will not be subsequently reviewed by any tribunal, except on the question whether 
there was an abuse of discretion, and the record of the decision then made is the 
primary evidence, the production of which renders it unnecessary to go into proof 
of facts and circumstances before the accounting office; s. or the courts, to show that 
the exigency existed. 

Such is not the effect, however, of a decision made by the same officer after the 
property is purchased: and the record of a decision or attempted decision so made 
by him cannot be legal proof of the existence of the exigency. 

I desire also to avoid misapprehension on another point. In proposing that requi- 
sitions be filed with the accounting officers as part of the voucher, it is conceded 
that the Treasury Department has no occasion to inspect the requisitions made by 
naval